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Hopes and Wishes for Celiac Disease in 2018 EP055

As we ring in the New Year, many of us take the time to jot down our aspirations for the next twelve months. What are your hopes and dreams for 2018? Health and happiness? An opportunity to travel? Stronger relationships?

Whether you have big plans to hike the Grand Canyon this year, or you simply resolve to get a little more sleep, it’s likely that aspects of health and wellness are a big part of your vision for 2018. The Gluten Free RN wants you to be happy and healthy in the coming year, and today she is sharing her hopes and wishes around celiac disease for 2018.

Nadine offers insight on taking control of what you can, including the food you eat. She shares her wish for widespread access to high-quality food and nutritional information that is NOT influenced by corporations. She explains the need for universal healthcare, better comprehensive testing for celiac disease (performed annually), and appropriate follow-up care for patients with a celiac diagnosis. Listen in to understand why Nadine advocates for a global celiac education campaign and learn how to evaluate new information about the disease with a critical ear. Let’s get happy and healthy in 2018 so that we can pursue all of our hopes and dreams!

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s wish for health, happiness and wellness

  • Reevaluate your choices and control what you can (sleep, food, activities)

Why Nadine advocates for universal healthcare

  • Everyone deserves access to high-quality healthcare without financial strain

The need for better comprehensive testing

  • Healthcare providers should be educated in ordering, interpreting labs

Nadine’s hope for worldwide knowledge of celiac disease

  • Patients in US not diagnosed correctly for 70 years
  • Consider mini-mass screening of patients/family

The importance of accurate media coverage

  • Stories not influenced by sponsors, pharmaceuticals, etc.

Why friends and family should be tested every year

  • Early diagnosis important
  • Can be ruled in, not ruled out

The value of nutritional information not influenced by food companies

  • Understand where food comes from, how processed

Nadine’s aspiration for universal access to high-quality food

  • Organic, whole foods with minimal processing
  • Provides fuel today, building blocks of healing

The need for appropriate follow-up care

  • Labs to address nutritional deficiencies, associated issues

Nadine’s insight around celiac education

  • Seek information, evaluate with critical ear

Resources:

Rotten Documentary Trailer

Whole30

Nadine’s Recommended Labs

Columbia University Celiac Disease Center

PALEOf(x)

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Thoughts on Celiac Disease EP054

In 11 years as the Gluten Free RN, Nadine has done an incredible amount of research on celiac disease and delivered more than 2,000 lectures. No question she is frustrated to see misinformation continue to make its way onto celiac support sites and Facebook groups. How does the average person sift through all the material that’s out there—material that may be influenced by corporations and pharmaceutical companies with a vested interest in the way celiac disease is perceived—to get to the most accurate information?

Just in time for the holidays, the Gluten Free RN is sharing her wish list around the direction of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the next ten years. She discusses the need for a global mass screening, explaining how celiac disease meets the World Health Organization’s criteria. She covers the reasons why pharmaceutical companies have no place in celiac research as well as the bad publicity the gluten-free community receives in the media.

Nadine speaks to the grievous lack of education about celiac disease among healthcare providers and shares her hope for a cultural shift to support people on a gluten-free diet, explaining the role nurses can play in ending the needless suffering. She talks about why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous and how to make the best food choices based on your lifestyle and current situation. Listen in and get empowered to accept responsibility for your health!

What’s Discussed: 

The need for a global mass screening

  • Celiac disease meets WHO criteria
  • 30-50% of population carries gene

Why pharmaceutical companies should not be involved in celiac research

  • Diet change resolves symptoms
  • Pharmaceutical involvement gives false hope for cure

The misinformation about celiac disease in the media

  • Misrepresentation in recent episode of Freakonomics Radio

The need to educate healthcare providers around celiac disease

Nadine’s call for support of people on a gluten-free diet

  • Don’t assume intentionally being difficult

The unique position of nurses to use their influence

  • Prevent needless suffering with understanding of celiac disease

Why you must accept responsibility for your own health

  • Take advantage of available resources
  • Find practitioners open to other modalities

How to avoid processed foods

  • Focus on raw, whole foods
  • Choose fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Don’t fall victim to convenience marketing
  • Use community, intuition to make decisions

Why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous

  • Nadine restored her health by eliminating grains
  • Unethical to suggest that celiac patient go off gluten-free diet

Resources:

Freakonomics Radio: The Demonization of Gluten

2004 NIH Consensus Statement on Celiac Disease

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Gluten Free Products EP048

The increasing number of gluten-free products on the market can be both a blessing and a curse. Yes, it gives us more options, but are those options truly safe and healthy?

Today the Gluten Free RN goes over the important questions to ask about the products you consume, explaining how the foods promoted by some gluten-free groups may be influenced by their corporate sponsors. She reminds us why we can’t simply trust the products labeled ‘gluten-free’ or ‘gluten removed,’ discussing the lack of oversight and standardization around classification and the cumulative effect of consuming a number of products that are just under the 20 ppm cutoff.

Nadine also shares a list of companies she trusts to consistently produce gluten-free products and offers suggestions around new food options we might explore. Listen in and learn to choose the nutrient-dense foods that will help your body heal!

What’s Discussed:

The importance of questioning the source of your information

  • Gluten-free groups take money from sponsors (corporations, pharmaceutical companies)

 Why Nadine avoids the ‘gluten removed’ label

 The questions to ask about gluten-free products

  • Is it manufactured in a designated facility?
  • From where do they source the ingredients?
  • Do they batch test those ingredients?

 The cumulative effect of eating many products just under 20 ppm

 Reliable companies that consistently produce truly gluten-free products

 The challenges faced by newly diagnosed celiac patients

  • Feeling different
  • Loss of convenience

 Why Nadine avoids gluten-free breads

 New food options to explore as a celiac patient

 Why Nadine recommends reevaluating the foods you consume

  • Ensure they are nutrient dense, don’t cause inflammation

 Why you can’t trust product labels

  • Corporations given six months to update after ingredients change
  • Not required to test products labeled gluten-free (no oversight, standardization)

 Nadine’s rules around choosing products

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture ingredients

Resources:

Canadian Celiac Association

The Gluten Dude on Facebook

Ground Breaker Brewing

The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America

Enjoy Life Foods

Glutino

Namaste Foods

Pamela’s Products

Jilz Crackers

Lundberg Family Farms

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Casabi Crackers & Flatbread

Jackson’s Honest

Kettle Brand

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Applegate

Beeler’s Pure Pork

Hempler’s

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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FAQ’s About Celiac Disease Answered EP047

How do I get over feeling sad about giving up the foods I love? Don’t celiac patients look a certain way? Can I eat wheat when I travel to Europe?

Today the Gluten Free RN is answering your frequently asked questions about celiac disease, clearing up misconceptions around the safety of wheat in Europe, the appearance of a celiac patient, and the percentage of the population that suffers from gluten sensitivity. She speaks to the challenges of getting your healthcare provider to do appropriate testing for celiac disease and the learning curve associated with changing your diet.

Nadine also explains the risks of embarking on a gluten challenge and the benefits of a super-good high fat diet. She discusses why a single breadcrumb can trigger an autoimmune response and how she uses tools like a Nima Sensor when she eats out. Listen in and learn why one negative test doesn’t rule you out for celiac disease, especially if you suffer from type 1 diabetes.

Having celiac disease doesn’t mean you have to live in a bubble. The Gluten Free RN wants to give you the answers you need to navigate the world—happy, healthy and gluten-free!

What’s Discussed: 

‘My sister has celiac disease, but I tested negative. I do have type 1 diabetes… What should I do?’

  • Get genetic test for HLA-DQ2, HLA-DQ8
  • Virtually every type 1 diabetic is gene carrier
  • One test doesn’t rule you out

 ‘Why do you use a Nima Sensor or EZ Gluten test strips? Doesn’t it give you a false sense of security?’

  • Have to trust others to prepare food when out
  • Not foolproof, but does give decent idea

 ‘A single breadcrumb or dusting of flour can trigger an autoimmune response? Really?’

 ‘I am overweight, I have dark hair, and I’m not of European descent. Don’t celiac patients look a certain way?’

  • Can’t see genes, celiac disease can affect any population worldwide
  • Overweight patients tend to be malnourished (unable to absorb nutrients)
  • Never rule out based on appearance, may not show physical symptoms

‘Why do you recommend a super-good high-fat diet?’

‘I’m already on a gluten-free diet. Do I need to go back to gluten to prove I have celiac disease?’

‘My cousin was just diagnosed with celiac disease, and she is very sad about giving up the food she grew up with. How can she get started on a gluten-free diet?’

  • Steep learning curve goes with process
  • Okay to feel sad, angry
  • Remember you will get better without surgery, medication
  • Try to see as an adventure

 ‘Why won’t my doctor order tests for celiac disease?’

  • Countries with for-profit healthcare tend to do poor job of testing, follow-up care
  • Fragmented, inaccurate education around celiac disease
  • Be own best advocate

 ‘Can I eat wheat in Europe?’

 ‘Is it true that celiac disease affects 1% of the population?’

  • 1% translates to 3M people
  • 3% is more accurate statistic
  • Won’t know for sure until conduct mass screening

Resources:

Gluten Free RN EP027: Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

 

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The Psychology of Eating Gluten Free EP045

We all just want to fit in, so it can be embarrassing to have special needs when it comes to your diet. Whether you are gluten-free, Paleo, or suffering from food allergies, a feeling of isolation is not uncommon. After all, you have to eat differently from the rest of your friends, family, or colleagues—and that makes you stand out. You run the risk of being perceived as picky or annoying, when the truth is that certain foods are toxic to your system!

Today the Gluten Free RN speaks to the psychology of eating gluten-free, explaining the sense of disbelief many gluten-sensitive individuals feel when the food they love turns out to be poison. She discusses ‘food ideology’ and why changing your diet can be so challenging.

Nadine also covers the doubt, mocking, and even anger that celiac and gluten-sensitive individuals face, offering suggestions for building connections with a like-minded, gluten-free community. Listen in as she outlines her approach to dating on a Paleo diet and reassuring family and friends who find a gluten-free diet too restrictive for kids. Learn to be your own best advocate and resist the social pressure to eat the standard American diet!    

What’s Discussed:

Why gluten sensitive patients must be willing to experiment

  • Learn how body works best
  • Identify foods that allow body to heal
  • Pinpoint foods that cause symptoms

A downtown Corvallis business owner’s testimonial

  • Couldn’t get doctor to test for celiac disease
  • Family gave hard time
  • Gluten-free for year
  • Bloating, abdominal pain went away
  • Head clear

How to research the possibility that gluten is causing your symptoms

  • Search PubMed
  • Use both spellings (celiac, coeliac)

Why people are resistant to diet change

  • Subscribe to particular food ideology
  • Media, social pressure to eat standard American diet

The difficulty around getting a celiac diagnosis

The value of preventative medicine

Dating on a gluten-free diet

  • Look for someone open to new ideas
  • Nadine’s partner is supportive, willing to change
  • On food path together
  • Health benefits whether celiac or not

The human need to be part of a community

  • Celiac patients may feel isolated from family, at work/school
  • Find ‘your people’ (gluten-free support group, cross-fit gym)

The global shift to a Western diet

  • Export fast food to world
  • Increased consumption of wheat, barley, rye and oats

Why Nadine recommends a Whole30 diet

  • Remove all grains, dairy, alcohol and sugar
  • Eat meat and fish, nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables
  • Allows body to reboot
  • Evaluate how you feel

The narcotic-like effect of gluten on the brain

  • Comfort foods (pasta, pizza) contain wheat, dairy
  • Cause chemical reaction in brain

Nadine’s recent experience in hospitals

  • Only nutrient-deficient, packaged foods available
  • Offerings toxic, full of sugar

Nadine’s rules around ingredients in packaged foods

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture every ingredient

Why people on a gluten-free diet are reluctant to tell others

  • Don’t want to be difficult, needy
  • Don’t want to call attention, be seen as ‘other’
  • May be questioned or face anger, mocking
  • Demoralizing to go to restaurant, grocery store (can’t eat 90%)

How to approach neighbors or family who view a gluten-free diet as too restrictive for kids

  • Ensure that kids are healthy, thriving
  • Let them know ‘not missing out’

The psychology of denial

  • Some celiac patients believe okay to cheat
  • Bread crumb, dusting of flour can cause autoimmune response

Nadine’s opposition to a gluten challenge

  • Can cause organ damage
  • Some never recover

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Resources:

 

Books by Dr. Rodney Ford

PubMed

The Whole30 Program

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

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The 2017 International Celiac Disease Symposium Recap #1 EP042

In his opening talk at the 2017 International Celiac Disease Symposium, celiac expert Dr. Abul Abbas of UC San Francisco said, “We are drowning in data, but thirsting for information.” Though there is still much debate around celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (even among global experts), the featured ICDS speakers sifted through the numbers to help practitioners interpret what the latest studies can tell us about the negative effects of gluten and how celiac disease presents in populations all over the world.

Today the globetrotting Gluten Free RN is coming to us from Thailand, after attending the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, India. Armed with the latest information from the ICDS clinical forum, Nadine covers talks given by Dr. Abbas on gluten and the immunological system, and Dr. Alessio Fasano on the spectrum of gluten-related disorders. She relays information regarding the barriers researchers face in studying autoimmune disease as well as gluten’s negative impact on body tissue, including that of our brain.

Nadine also shares the most up-to-date statistics around the big business that is celiac disease and the increasing prevalence of gluten intolerance in the US and Asia. She discusses the importance of celiac testing in patients with other autoimmune and neurological disorders and the need for a global education campaign. Listen as Nadine educates you about what gluten is, where it hides, what you can do to avoid it, and how to undo the damage and get healthy again!

What’s Discussed:

The challenge of eating gluten-free in India

The highlights of Dr. Abul Abbas’ talk on the immunological system

  • Celiac disease as autoimmune issue
  • ‘Drowning in data, but thirsting for info’

The importance of the thymus gland

  • T cells manufactured there

Why the ‘mouse model’ doesn’t work well in the study of celiac disease

The impossibility of in vivo experiments for celiac research

The significance of epithelial barriers in a functioning immune system

  • First line of defense against microorganisms
  • Produce local antibodies

The difficulty of studying the dendritic cells

  • Inside tissues

How the immune system recognizes double-stranded RNA (viruses)

  • Can’t escape autoimmune response
  • Should not recognize own single-stranded as ‘invader’

Dr. Terry Wahls’ work around the mitochondria

  • Cured MS with Paleo diet

Dr. Alessio Fasano’s presentation

  • ‘Spectrum of Gluten-Related Disorders’
  • Controversy re: who should go gluten-free
  • Gluten affects every tissue in body (even brain)
  • Celiac cases double every 15 years in US
  • 1:2 in US will try gluten-free diet this year

The big business of celiac disease

  • $17.6B industry at end of 2017
  • Largest untapped market in world

Who is affected by the gluten protein

  • Gluten can’t be digested by human body (long chain amino acid)
  • Triggers autoimmune response, especially in HLA-DQ2/HLA-DQ8 gene carriers
  • Patients without genetic predisposition can present with villous atrophy
  • In absence of celiac diagnosis, may still have non-celiac gluten sensitivity
  • AGA-positive patients at risk for developing neurological issues

How infants exposed to gluten are at an increased risk for developing celiac disease

  • Includes exposure in utero, breast milk
  • No downside to eliminating gluten from baby’s diet

The value of avoiding gluten exposure for infants

  • Emotionally stable
  • Grow, develop appropriately

The latest statistics regarding the prevalence of celiac disease

  • Increased to 3% in US (not 1% consistently reported)
  • 30-50% of world population has genetic predisposition
  • Global prevalence of 1.37%

Celiac disease in the Asian population

  • Used to say could not develop celiac disease
  • At increased risk of developing neurological disorders
  • 6-8M people in east, south Asia
  • 50 countries make up 60% of world population
  • 35B people in China have celiac disease
  • 22B people in India have celiac disease
  • 19% of Chinese 16-25 tested positive for celiac disease in study

How the Chinese diet has evolved over time

  • Older Chinese ate much less wheat
  • Fast food has become common in recent years
  • Despite rice-based diet, many products contain wheat (soy sauce, cashews)

Other disorders that may indicate undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Anemia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Elevated liver enzymes
  • Eating disorders
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis

Why patients should be tested for celiac disease annually

  • Can seroconvert at anytime
  • Develops at any age with any/no symptoms

The new information about a potential connection between Wilson’s and celiac disease

  • 3% of Wilson’s patients tested positive

What celiac experts agreed on at ICDS 2017

  • Poor support, understanding of celiac disease
  • Need to increase knowledge base (general practitioners, food manufacturers, public)
  • Important to find where gluten hides
  • Must take education campaign to non-traditional settings

Resources:

Nima Sensor

Gluten Free RN Travel Podcast EP036

Gluten Free Passport Allergy Cards

Dr. Terry Wahls’ Website

ICDS 2017 Program

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease EP040

According to the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, 10% of MS patients also suffer from celiac disease. Studies conducted in Italy and Spain uncovered a significant increased prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of MS patients, 18% and 32% respectively. Additional research has identified situations in which celiac disease mimicked other neurological disorders such as MS and ALS.

 With evidence like that, it is definitely worth it to further explore the relationship between MS and celiac disease. Today, the Gluten Free RN investigates whether MS and celiac disease are similar, related, or perhaps the same thing, as she shares case studies from the literature and her own experience.

Nadine discusses the story of Dr. Terry Wahls, explaining how she was able to resolve her symptoms of MS with a variation of a Paleo diet. She outlines the analogous symptoms of MS and celiac cerebellar ataxia, the neurological damage caused by gluten, and how malabsorption of nutrients caused by intestinal damage can extend to medication. Listen and learn how Nadine and others have resolved symptoms of MS and other neurological disorders on a gluten-free diet!

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s MS scare

  • Bouts with falling, dragging feet
  • Numbness, tingling (neuropathy)
  • Symptoms disappeared after adopting gluten-free diet
  • Takes two to three years to resolve neurological symptoms

Dr. Terry Wahls’ story

  • Diagnosed with MS, confined to wheelchair
  • Continued to research condition
  • Adopted version of Paleo diet
  • Now walks without cane, rides bike again
  • Conducts seminars to share how healed mitochondria

The commonalities between celiac disease and MS

  • Both autoimmune issues
  • Studies necessary to determine if conditions are similar, related, or the same

How celiac disease affects the body

  • Triggered by ingestion of gluten
  • Causes villous atrophy, cryptic hyperplasia in small intestines, damage to immune system
  • Primarily neurological disorder

The symptoms of celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Poor balance
  • Hard to distinguish where body is in space
  • Trip, stumble or fall
  • Related to vision

The multi-organ manifestations of celiac disease in the central nervous system

  • White matter lesions
  • Inflammatory cerebral spinal fluid syndrome
  • Sinus venous thrombosis
  • Epilepsy, seizure disorders
  • Cerebellar pontine atrophy
  • Encephalopathy
  • Myelopathy
  • Dementia
  • Gluten ataxia
  • Migraines, headaches
  • Depression, anxiety
  • Cerebellar ataxia

Nadine’s patient who wasn’t responding to MS medication

  • Nadine recommended celiac testing
  • Panel negative, but gene carrier
  • Already adopted gluten-free diet
  • Fewer medications necessary
  • Hope to decrease, discontinue meds
  • Malabsorption issues extend to medications, could stem from undiagnosed celiac disease

The 2014 study in Vienna regarding celiac disease and MS

  • Concluded that celiac disease may mimic MS
  • Celiac disease may be present despite absence of anti-gliadin antibodies
  • If patient history indicates gastrointestinal issues, celiac disease should be considered even if CSF and MRI findings suggest MS

The new evidence around seronegativity in celiac disease

  • Most labs only test for tissue transglutaminase 2
  • Transglutaminase 6 is specific for neurological damage caused by gluten

The 2014 Italian study of the genetic overlap between celiac disease and MS

  • Sites significant increased prevalence of celiac disease in MS first-degree relatives (18%)
  • Recommends celiac testing in MS patients who aren’t responding to MS treatment or present with ataxia

The association between MS and celiac disease as reported by the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

  • Approximately 10% of those who have MS also have celiac disease

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

The 2013 Iranian case study of a celiac patient diagnosed with MS

  • 37-year-old woman with history of chronic abdominal pain
  • Diagnosed with celiac disease, adopted gluten-free diet
  • Became ataxic, met with neurologist
  • MRI indicated multiple sclerosis
  • Nadine argues that patient likely re-exposed to gluten

How gluten acts as a neurotoxin

  • Pastor exposed to gluten in cookies had acute neurological event
  • Shaking, tremors (similar to stroke)

The 2007 Oxford case study of celiac disease mimicking ALS

  • 44-year-old man with progressive right-sided spastic hemiparesis (muscle wasting)
  • Remote family history of celiac disease
  • Strict gluten-free diet resolved most symptoms

Why patients with neurological symptoms should be tested for celiac disease

  • The anti-gliadin antibody is excellent biomarker for gluten sensitivity

Why it is acceptable to adopt a gluten-free diet if your antibody test is negative for celiac disease

The Paleo diet Nadine suggests for celiac and gluten-sensitive patients

  • Gluten-, dairy-free
  • Whole food
  • Low carb, super-good high fat

The increased prevalence of celiac disease in MS patients revealed in a 2011 study

  • Increased prevalence found in eight of 72 MS patients (11.1%)
  • Also in first-degree relatives (13/126 or 32%)
  • Advises increased efforts aimed at early detection and dietary treatment

The fundamentals of MS

  • Chronic disease of unknown etiology
  • T-cell mediated antibody response
  • Leads to demyelination of central nervous system
  • Associated with autoimmunity (body attacking itself)
  • Damage to enteric nervous system can lead to constipation

How to conduct your own research around celiac disease and neurological disorders

  • Celiac researcher Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou

How long it takes to heal on a gluten-free diet

  • Villous atrophy heals in six months to one year
  • Neurological damage takes two to four years

The nutrients a celiac patient is missing that contribute to neurological issues

  • B vitamins
  • Trace amounts of copper
  • Magnesium
  • Zinc

The autoimmune symptoms Nadine resolved/reversed with a gluten-free diet

  • MS symptoms
  • Graves’ disease
  • Positive ANA panel

Why it’s important for celiac patients to work with educated practitioners who understand functional medicine

Resources:

Dr. Terry Wahls’ TED Talk

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principle by Terry Wahls MD

“Celiac Disease with Cerebral and Peripheral Nerve Involvement Mimicking Multiple Sclerosis” in the Journal of Medicine and Life

“Celiac Disease in Multiple Sclerosis: A Controversial Issue” in the International Journal of Neurology and Neurotherapy

University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center MS Info

“Multiple Sclerosis or Neurological Manifestations of Celiac Disease” in Advanced Biomedical Research

“A Case of Celiac Disease Mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis” in Nature Clinical Practice Neurology

“Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Multiple Sclerosis” in BMC Neurology

“A Case of Concurrent Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease” in Govaresh

“Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease” in the Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology

“A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease” in Case Reports in Neurological Medicine

 Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Dental Issues and Celiac Disease EP039

Did you know that it is possible to diagnose celiac disease with a smile?

Damage from gluten starts in the mouth, and today the Gluten Free RN explores the important role dentists can play in identifying undiagnosed celiac disease. She outlines the symptoms of celiac disease that present in the mouth, the follow-up questions dentists should ask when they notice dental enamel defects or aphthous ulcers, and the nature of the tongue as an indicator of overall health.

This episode covers how the plastics in orthodontic retainers might contain gluten and what to do if you are accidentally exposed. Nadine also explains the relationship between fat-soluble vitamins and celiac disease, as well as the nutrient deficiencies a potential celiac patient should test for. You’re never fully dressed without a smile, so listen in to understand how to keep your mouth healthy—and prevent the accumulation of complications from celiac disease with a whole food, gluten-free diet!

What’s Discussed: 

How the GI tract functions

  • Starts at mouth, ends at rectum
  • Allows us to consume food, liquid
  • Only extract what body needs
  • Expel the rest

How damage from gluten presents

  • Malabsorption of nutrients
  • Inflammation
  • Autoimmune issues
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • ALS
  • Lupus
  • MS
  • Sjögren’s
  • Leaky gut

How dentists can play an important role in identifying undiagnosed celiac disease

The symptoms of celiac disease that present in the mouth

  • Dental enamel defects
  • Aphthous ulcers (canker sores)
  • Cheilosis (cracks, open sores where upper and lower lip join)
  • Dry, cracked lips
  • TMJ—temporal mandibular joint disorder
  • Pain where jaws meet
  • Inflammation of the jaw
  • Clicking
  • Lock jaw
  • Mouth pain, burning
  • Oral lesions
  • Tongue pain, tingling
  • Redness, swelling of the tongue
  • Tongue sores
  • Changes in taste, smell
  • Diminished sensory input
  • Dry mouth
  • Sore throat
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Increased thirst
  • Bleeding gums
  • Delayed eruption of teeth
  • Pyrosis
  • Oral lichen planus
  • Glossitis (inflammation of tongue)
  • Clearing throat
  • Sinus infections
  • Redness, swelling of the uvula

How Nadine treats gluten exposure

  • Activated charcoal
  • Drink water

The grains to look for in personal care products (e.g.: lip balm)

  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Oats

The relationship between fat soluble vitamins and celiac disease

  • Gluten causes malabsorption
  • Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat soluble
  • Under 40 in vitamin D may indicate deficiency in all

How we tested for celiac disease in children in the early 20th century

  • Fecal fat score
  • Pale stool that floats suggests malabsorption of A, D, E and K

Why parents should be tested for celiac disease prior to pregnancy

The fetal development issues that may present if an expectant mother is unable to absorb nutrients

  • Dental enamel defects
  • Smaller jaw formation
  • Smaller airway passages

Why Nadine advocates for a mass screening

How gluten in plastics, personal care products can prevent celiac patients from healing

The questions dentists should ask when they notice dental enamel defects, aphthous ulcers

  • Other clinical celiac symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, fatigue)
  • Associated disorders (type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis, etc.)
  • Family history of celiac disease

Why we need to get much better at recognizing celiac signs and symptoms

  • Even in Canada, diagnosis takes 11.7 years

Why Eastern medicine examines the tongue as an indicator of overall health

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Why it is acceptable to adopt a gluten-free diet if your antibody test is negative for celiac disease

The deficiencies a potential celiac patient should test for

  • Calcium
  • Magnesium RBC
  • Vitamin D
  • Zinc
  • Folic acid

Why thrush may be an indicator of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity

Why one negative test for celiac disease doesn’t rule anyone out

The importance of early diagnosis

  • Symptoms accumulate over the years

The Paleo diet Nadine suggests for celiac and gluten-sensitive patients

  • Whole food
  • Focus on local, fresh
  • 100% grass-fed meat (no antibiotic, no hormone)
  • Fish and eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • 100% organic fruits and vegetables

Resources:

 “An Orthodontic Retainer Preventing Remission in Celiac Disease”  in Clinical Pediatrics

“Oral Manifestations of Celiac Disease: A Clinical Guide for Dentists” in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association

Gluten Free RN Podcast EP027: Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

“The Association Between Celiac Disease, Dental Enamel Defects, and Aphthous Ulcers in a United States Cohort” in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

“Small-Bowel Changes in Recurrent Ulceration of the Mouth” in Hepatogastroenterology

“Oral Signs and HLA-DQB1*02 Haploytypes in the Celiac Paediatric Patient: A Preliminary Study” in Autoimmune Diseases

“The Oral Manifestations of Celiac Disease: Information for the Pediatric Dentist” in Pediatric Dentistry

“Oral Aphthous Ulcers and Dental Enamel Defects in Children with Coeliac Disease” in Acta Paediatrica

“Oral and Dental Manifestations of Celiac Disease” in the New York State Dental Journal

“Jejunal Mucosal Abnormalities in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Ulceration” in The British Medical Journal

“Dental Enamel Defects in Adult Coeliac Disease” in the European Journal of Internal Medicine

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Children with Dental Enamel Defects”  in ISRN Pediatrics

“Celiac Disease Associated with Recurrent Aphthae” in Gut

“Importance of Oral Signs in the Diagnosis of Atypical Forms of Celiac Disease” in Recenti Progressi in Medicina

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease, Suicide, Morbidity and Mortality EP038

People are suffering. From a feeling of hopelessness. From depression and anxiety. Add to that a despair that no one supports them, and you have a desperate individual at an increased risk of committing suicide.

This topic hits close to home for Nadine, as she lost a nephew to suicide in 2007. Ian struggled with addiction issues, and he took his life at the age of 19. Because her family is predisposed to celiac disease, Nadine wonders if undiagnosed celiac disease may have been partially to blame for her nephew’s issues. Today she explores the mental health disorders that are associated with gluten getting through the blood-brain barrier. She also explains how undiagnosed celiac disease puts patients at an increased risk for morbidity, and stresses the fact that celiac disease can—and will—kill you if it goes untreated.

Listen in as the Gluten Free RN tells her own story of improved mental health on a gluten-free diet. She also covers the types of cancers that might be prevented by going gluten-free, the connection between AFib and celiac disease, and how dermatitis herpetiformis affects patients. Listen and learn the best diet to help you get better, faster, and why medical professionals need to pay more attention to the intestines!

What’s Discussed: 

How to define morbidity and mortality

  • Morbidity = sickness
  • Mortality = death
  • People with undiagnosed celiac disease have increased risk for morbidity

How morbidity presents itself in undiagnosed celiac patients

  • Chronic anemia
  • Fatigue
  • Osteoporosis
  • Failure to thrive, grow
  • Infertility
  • Thyroid issues
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Lupus
  • MS
  • Sjögren’s

Information from the World Health Organization (WHO)

  • Diarrheal diseases are #1 killer of children
  • Only funded one celiac study
  • 1:19 rate in pediatric patients of Sahrawi descent

The prominent mental health issues associated with celiac disease

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Anti-social behavior
  • Suicide

How removing gluten from her diet improved Nadine’s mental health

  • Brain fog went away
  • ‘Got brain back’
  • Embrace all life has to offer
  • Freeing to know cause of symptoms

The grains that contain gluten

  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Oats (cross-contamination)

The Paleo diet Nadine suggests for celiac and gluten-sensitive patients

  • Whole food
  • Focus on local, fresh
  • 100% grass-fed meat (no antibiotic, no hormone)
  • Fish and eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • 100% organic fruits and vegetables

Nadine’s experience with celiac disease

  • Multi-system organ failure, seven auto-immune disorders
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Diagnosed by dermatologist
  • Tests negative, but HLA-DQ2.5 gene carrier (both parents)

The connection between AFib and celiac disease

  • AFib puts patient at risk for stroke, sudden death
  • Check for magnesium RBC deficiency
  • Can be corrected with gluten-free diet
  • Resolve without pharmaceuticals

How dermatitis herpetiformis affects patients

  • Extremely painful, itchy skin
  • Manifestation of celiac disease
  • Suicide rate higher in patients with DH
  • Dapsone alone will not heal
  • Must also go gluten-free
  • Prolonged use of Dapsone is toxic to liver (bowel cancer, lymphoma)

The cancers that are potentially preventable on a gluten-free diet

  • Lymphoma
  • Small intestinal adenocarcinoma
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Oral pharyngeal

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Other disorders that could be mitigated by a gluten-free diet

  • Chronic anemia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Osteomalacia
  • Thyroid disorder
  • Dementia
  • Alzheimer’s
  • MS
  • Type 1 diabetes

How long it takes to receive celiac diagnosis in US

  • 9-15 years

The risks for patients diagnosed with celiac disease in childhood

  • Threefold increased risk of death (suicide, accidental death, violence)

Nadine’s research around celiac testing in autopsy

  • Couldn’t get straight answer from medical examiner (state of Oregon)
  • Study conducted in 1974 concluded that despite systematically positive response to gluten-free diet, some patients ended up with lymphoma

How Nadine periodically gives her system a detox

  • Limited fast (three to seven days)
  • Give organs, immune system a rest

Why medical professionals should give more attention to the intestines

  • Vast majority of signs, symptoms originate in intestines
  • 70-90% of immune system in intestines
  • Homocysteine levels higher in newly diagnosed celiac patients, related to other health issues

The issues that can result from undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Appendix removed
  • Gall bladder removed

The definition of refractory celiac disease

  • Intestines don’t heal even on gluten-free diet
  • Sometimes caused by continued exposure to trace amounts of gluten
  • Some patients past point of being able to heal

Why it’s crucial to remove all gluten from the environment

  • Celiac patients should feel safe where live, work and go to school
  • Even trace amounts cause continued symptoms, early death
  • Takes an emotional toll to be hypervigilant, mocked by loved ones

The connection between undiagnosed celiac disease the despair that leads to suicide

  • No hope of getting better
  • Don’t feel supported, believed (celiac is real disease)
  • Depression, anxiety and other mental health disorders
  • More vulnerable if undiagnosed and enduring abusive relationship

What happens when gluten gets through a leaky blood-brain barrier

  • Inflammation of the brain
  • Hypoxia (decreased oxygen flow)
  • Low end—brain fog, anxiety, depression, fatigue
  • High end—bipolar disease, antisocial behavior, learning disabilities, schizophrenia

The risks associated with eating traditionally grown fruits and vegetables

  • Glyphosate in Roundup causes leaky gut

The goals of the first six months on a gluten-free diet

  • Remove all gluten
  • Allow villi to grow back
  • Heal inflammation
  • Repair immune system

Resources:

Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Down, Turner and Williams Syndrome

WHO Celiac Disease Study

“Necropsy Studies on Adult Coeliac Disease” in the Journal of Clinical Pathology

“Mortality in Celiac Disease” in Gastroenterology

“The Global Burden of Celiac Disease” in PLoSONE

“The Unknown Burden and Cost of Celiac Disease in the US”  in Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research

“Long-Term Mortality in People with Celiac Disease Diagnosed in Childhood Compared with Adulthood” in the American Journal of Gastroenterology

“Increased Risk of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Coeliac Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Study” in the European Heart Journal

“Increased Suicide Risk in Coeliac Disease—A Swedish Nationwide Cohort Study” in Digestive and Liver Disease

“The Burden of Celiac Disease and the Value of Having It Diagnosed” by Fredrik Norström of UMEA University

“Complications of Coeliac Disease: Are All Patients at Risk?”

“Evidence-Informed Expert Recommendations for the Management of Celiac Disease in Children” in Pediatrics

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism