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Cardiac Issues Associated with Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance EP023


Given the choice between a heart transplant and a gluten-free diet, the vast majority – if not all – of us would quickly opt for the diet! Yet the medical community continues to ignore celiac disease as a potential cause of cardiac complications, despite documented connections between the two conditions.

The Gluten Free RN is sharing her experience with heart attack and stroke victims in the ER, and discussing the necessity of screening cardiac patients for celiac disease. She gets into the nitty gritty of how intestinal damage leads to nutrient deficiencies that affect the cardiac system, and reveals the cardiac symptoms that may resolve on a gluten-free diet.

Listen in and learn about the actual cause of heart attack and stroke (spoiler alert – it’s not high cholesterol) and how Nadine has achieved a lipid panel akin to that of a ‘23-year-old marathon runner’!

What’s Discussed: 

The connection between cardiac issues and celiac disease

  • Study linked celiac disease to almost doubled risk of CAD
  • Documented connection between gluten and cardiomyopathy

The real cause of heart attack and stroke

  • Thought to be high cholesterol
  • Actual cause is inflammation/malabsorption

How a gluten-free diet can resolve cardiomyopathy

  • Medical community claims cardiomyopathy can be treated with meds, but not cured
  • Patient eventually needs heart transplant
  • Anecdotal evidence proves that removing gluten may cure profound heart failure

Nadine’s experience in treating cardiac patients as a critical care nurse in the ER

  • ER staff does not take a magnesium panel
  • Deficiencies in magnesium or calcium can cause arrhythmias (irregular heartbeat)
  • Even when patient tested for ‘everything,’ celiac disease and nutritional panels often omitted

How to correct a magnesium deficiency

  • Food (pumpkin seeds, molasses, etc.)
  • Magnesium supplements (including calcium, zinc and vitamin D)

How intestinal damage leads to nutrient deficiencies that affect the cardiac system

  • Thiamine deficiency may lead to wet beriberi or acute pernicious beriberi
  • Low electrolytes may lead to arrhythmia
  • Low iron, B vitamin may lead to anemia (less oxygen in blood)
  • Low vitamin K levels affects protein S and protein C levels (involved in clotting)

Cardiac symptoms that may resolve on a gluten-free or Paleo diet

  • Arrhythmias
  • Chest pain
  • Difficulty breathing

The myth that fat is bad for us

  • Nadine consumes a super-good high fat diet
  • Her lipid panel ‘looks like a 23-year-old marathon runners’
  • Cardiac risk factor very low

Nadine’s call for a worldwide mass screening for celiac disease

  • Find undiagnosed
  • Prevent cardiac disease, stroke

Resources:

“Celiac Disease Linked to Almost Doubled Risk of CAD” by Marlene Busko

PubMed

Gluten Toxicity: The Mysterious Symptoms of Celiac Disease, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance by Shelly L. Stuart

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Connection Between Undiagnosed Celiac Disease and Sleep Disorders EP022


We all know how it feels to struggle through the day when you didn’t get enough sleep the night before. Your brain feels fuzzy, it’s tough to focus, and you simply aren’t the best version of yourself! The good news is, there may be a simple explanation for your sleep disorder – and there are steps you can take to eliminate the potential celiac symptoms that are keeping you up at night.

Today the Gluten Free RN shares her struggle with sleep deprivation as an undiagnosed celiac patient who also worked the night shift in the ER. Find out how she leveraged a Paleo diet and went from having a contentious relationship with sleep to becoming a champion ‘Olympic Sleeper’ who enjoys at least eight hours of rest every night!

She also covers the components of an ideal sleep space, suggestions for implementing an evening routine, and the benefits of a good night’s rest. Listen and learn about the connection between sleep disorders and undiagnosed celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s struggle with sleep working the night shift

  • 10 years as ER nurse working 12-hour night shifts
  • Difficult to shift into normal sleep pattern on days off
  • Circadian rhythm thrown off, felt fuzzy-brained
  • Needed extra sleep
  • Struggle to block out distractions

The correlation between undiagnosed celiac disease and sleep disorders

  • Celiac symptoms can keep you awake at night
  • May experience joint pain, muscle pain, DH, eczema, headaches, muscle twitches, restless leg syndrome

How a Paleo lifestyle can alleviate symptoms preventing sleep

How many hours of sleep you should be getting each night

  • Nadine recommends 8-10 hours of good quality sleep
  • Provides the energy for your body to carry out the tasks of daily living

The components of an ideal sleep space

  • Comfortable mattress
  • Quality sheets
  • Plenty of supportive pillows
  • Appropriate temperature
  • Fresh air, if possible
  • No electronic equipment in the room (i.e.: phones, televisions, computers)
  • Source of white noise (e.g.: fan, music)

The model evening routine

  • Limit screen time in the hours before bed
  • Try relaxing activities like reading or knitting instead
  • Take a warm bath with Epsom salt (muscle relaxer, source of magnesium)
  • Consider magnesium supplements

Celiac symptoms that can cause sleep apnea

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

The repercussions of vitamin C deficiency

Signs of sleep disorders in children that may be caused by undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Can’t or don’t want to go to sleep, crying
  • Cranky and fatigued during the day
  • Decreased productivity
  • Learning disabilities
  • Difficulty with focus

Signs of celiac disease in children

  • Short stature
  • Anemia
  • Falling off growth chart
  • Learning disabilities
  • Seizure disorders

Why anyone with sleep disorders should get tested for celiac disease

How Nadine’s sleep issues went away on a gluten-free diet

  • Eliminated back pain, joint pain, skin discomfort, muscle pain, muscle spasms and leg cramps
  • Now she qualifies as an ‘Olympic Sleeper’

The unhealthy approach to compensating for lack of sleep

  • Take in stimulants to make it through the day (e.g.: coffee, sugar)
  • Take depressants at night to help fall asleep (e.g.: alcohol, prescription meds)
  • Everything you consume impacts your health and ability to sleep

A healthy option that functions as a sleep aid

The benefits of a good night’s rest

When to take multivitamins

  • In the morning with food
  • At night before bed (absorbed differently)

The risks associated with prescription medications

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Potential Connection Between Parkinson’s and Celiac Disease EP021


A diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is devastating, and the associated symptoms – difficulty walking, tremors, memory issues – are debilitating. But what if those symptoms aren’t necessarily indicative of Parkinson’s after all? What if a simple diet change could improve or even eliminate those symptoms?

Today Nadine explores anecdotal evidence suggesting that the symptoms of Parkinson’s and other demyelination syndromes might be actually be caused by celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. She argues that as Parkinson’s diagnoses become more and more common, it is imperative that we explore the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease.

Listen in to understand how gluten can affect the neurological system, why Parkinson’s patients should be tested for celiac disease, and how a gluten-free diet can heal neurological damage.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s Parkinson’s patient

  • Diagnosed with celiac disease as a child in the 1940’s
  • Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s
  • Symptoms included difficulty walking, falling, stooped gait, masked appearance, tremors, memory issues and confusion
  • Discovered unintentional gluten exposure in the home
  • Moved to adult foster home to ensure gluten-free diet
  • Many symptoms went away
  • Working with neurologist to wean off Parkinson’s meds

Why patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s, ALS and MS should get test for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

  • Every nerve in the body is insulated with myelin
  • Myelin is made of fat
  • Gluten prevents the absorption of fats
  • Parkinson’s, ALS and MS are all demyelination syndromes

The need for research regarding the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease

  • The University of Chicago asserts there is ‘no published evidence of a connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease’
  • Nadine argues that enough anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that a connection should be investigated

Nadine’s recommendation for a comprehensive celiac lab test

  • Cyrex Labs tests for 25 of the gluten intolerant antibodies, including tTG-2, tTG-3 and tTG-6
  • Ask for a total IgA and IgG in addition to the Cyrex Array 3
  • Insurance should cover the tests
  • Can be ordered by any practitioner

Celiac diagnoses in patients over 60

  • 30% of newly diagnosed celiac patients are over 60
  • Many have neurological issues
  • Neuropathy
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Seizure disorders
  • Difficulty walking
  • Falling
  • Balance issues
  • MS
  • Nadine’s patients improve on a Paleo diet

The Stanford idiopathic familial narcolepsy study

  • Entire family diagnosed with narcolepsy
  • Found that family members had celiac disease
  • Adopting a gluten-free diet eliminated the narcolepsy
  • Family now runs organic farm

The increasing number of Parkinson’s diagnoses

  • More and more common
  • UK neurological expert routinely tests for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

  • Heal intestines
  • Eliminate inflammation
  • Repair immune system
  • Replete nutrient deficiencies

Vitamin D

  • Cancer preventative
  • Level should be between 60-80
  • Indicator of all fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • ‘Sunshine’ vitamin synthesized through skin
  • Must also be taken in dietarily
  • Little chance of overdosing on D3

What your nails can tell you about your health

  • Look for white spots, cracked nails, hangnails
  • May indicate lack of zinc, D3, or B vitamins

Dr. Terry Wahls’ MS misdiagnosis

  • Diagnosed with MS and required wheelchair
  • Healed with a gluten-free diet
  • Can ride her bike and walk without a cane

Nadine’s story

  • At 40, her symptoms suggested MS
  • Issues with clumsiness (falling, dragging feet, dropping things, difficulty with balance)
  • Problems went away on a gluten-free diet
  • Nutrient deficiencies were causing neurological issues

Celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Caused by lesions on or inflammation of the brain
  • Results in inability to walk straight
  • Tissue can be healed on a gluten free diet

 Resources:

Cyrex Laboratories

Midway Farms

La Mancha Ranch and Orchard

Dr. Wahls’ TED Talk

Dr. Wahls’ YouTube Channel

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles – by Terry Wahls, MD and Eve Adamson

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Weight Loss and Weight Gain Associated with Celiac Disease EP020

Forget everything you thought you knew about obesity.

68% of the population of the US is overweight, and we know that there are a number of health risks associated with the issue. But did you know that people are overweight because their bodies are actually starving?

 Today the Gluten Free RN is challenging your assumptions about weight gain and celiac disease, revealing the surprising way your body compensates for malnourishment, the necessity of fat in nutrient absorption, and the healing power of a whole food gluten-free diet.

Listen and learn why more people are overweight when diagnosed with celiac disease than underweight, more have constipation than diarrhea, and more have neurological disorders than gastrointestinal issues. Nadine is prepared to shake up your idea of what it means to have celiac disease and offer guidance regarding the food we should be eating in order to heal, and lose – or gain – weight in the process!

What’s Discussed: 

The classic symptoms of celiac disease

  • Used to be identified by weight loss and chronic diarrhea
  • We now know there are well over 300 signs and symptoms

The obesity epidemic in the US

  • 68% of the population is overweight
  • Obesity increases morbidity and mortality
  • The majority of celiac patients are overweight

Why celiac patients are overweight

  • Damage to intestines prevents absorption of nutrients
  • Body is starving, so it compensates by storing fat as cheap energy

The health risks associated with obesity

The failings of fast food

  • Little to no nutritional value
  • ‘Bad’ fat
  • Little use as energy

The whole food diet Nadine recommends for celiac and gluten sensitive patients

 The rapid weight loss of overweight celiac patients once they adopt a gluten-free diet

Why wounds may not heal appropriately in celiac patients

  • Body is malnourished and cannot absorb nutrients
  • Nutrients are necessary to heal tissue

How to heal your body with food

  • Choose fermented foods
  • Regenerate villi in intestines
  • Build diverse microbiome

Nadine’s patient with tunneling wound in sacral area

  • Wound would not heal, required daily dressing changes
  • Patient was HLA-DQ2 gene carrier
  • Wound healed after 10 days on a gluten-free diet

How a gluten-free diet affects underweight celiac patients

  • Muscle and tissue build appropriately
  • Weight increases as nutrients are absorbed

The necessity of a high-fat diet for celiac patients

  • Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat-soluble
  • The brain is made of fat

‘Good’ fats that Nadine recommends incorporating into your diet

  • Listen in for the full list!!

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Legal Issues Surrounding Celiac Disease EP019

In Italy, it takes only two to three weeks to get diagnosed with celiac disease. In the United States, however, it typically takes nine to 15 years. Why is there such a huge discrepancy? And what are the legal ramifications for practitioners who overlook celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, causing patients unnecessary pain and suffering?

 On this episode, Nadine explores the legal issues surrounding celiac disease as well as the potential reasons for delayed diagnosis in the US. She also explains the differences between universal healthcare and the for-profit system and how each appears to influence celiac diagnosis.

 Listen and learn what medical practitioners need to know about celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in order to avoid being sued for malpractice, the value of standardization in celiac testing and follow-up care, and how you can get involved in advocating for universal coverage.

What’s Discussed: 

How the US health insurance system works

  • Usually purchased through employer
  • Loss of job often means loss of coverage
  • ACA provides coverage for many who were uninsured
  • For-profit system

 Why Nadine is an advocate for a single-payer system

  • People treated in ER with or without insurance (we pay regardless)
  • US healthcare is very expensive, yet outcomes poor

 Celiac disease diagnoses around the world

  • Italy: 2-3 weeks; standardized follow-up care
  • US: 9-15 years; patients endure numerous other tests, misdiagnoses, unnecessary medications
  • Canada: effective early diagnosis, but follow-up care lacking

 The excuses practitioners use to avoid diagnosing celiac disease

  • Don’t believe in it, despite research and documentation
  • Don’t want to learn about another illness
  • Gluten-free diet is too difficult for patients

 Symptoms Nadine encountered as an ER nurse that may have signaled celiac disease

  • Migraine headaches
  • Abdominal pain
  • Neurological disorders (headaches, difficulty with balance)
  • Fever

 Why practitioners should be concerned about malpractice suits if celiac disease goes undiagnosed

  • Ignorance is not a defense
  • Michael Marsh contends that failure to do appropriate screening signals liability
  • Avoid by learning the basics of celiac disease, how to diagnose and follow-up

 Why celiac disease needs to be part of differential diagnosis for every patient

 Indicators of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 gene denotes predisposition for celiac proper
  • AGA antibody suggests gluten sensitivity

 Maladies suffered by patients whose celiac disease went undiagnosed

  • Mental health issues
  • Neurological disorders
  • Seizures
  • Balance issues
  • Abdominal pain
  • Incorrect diagnosis of Crohn’s or colitis
  • Hemorrhoids
  • GERD
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Cancer

 Why standardization of testing and follow-up care is a necessity

  • Screenings are often misinterpreted
  • Celiac patients who follow a gluten-free diet are often told that they have been cured or that the initial test was a false positive when follow-up shows antibodies in normal range

 The story of Nadine’s 70-year-old celiac patient

  • Diagnosed with celiac disease by biopsy, but received no follow-up care
  • Suffered from significant neurological issues (e.g.: gluten ataxia, falling)
  • Nadine recommended standard lab tests
  • Primary care doctor refused
  • Patient returned to Nadine in distress
  • Doctor culpable for patient’s neurological damage

 Why celiac patients should consider advocating for universal coverage

 The differences between celiac diagnoses under universal vs. for-profit insurance systems

  • Financial benefit to early diagnosis under universal system (i.e.: UK, Canada, Italy)
  • No benefit to early diagnosis for insurers under for-profit structure

Resources Mentioned:

 Physicians for a National Health Program

 Health Care for All Oregon

 Mid-Valley Health Care Advocates

Additional Resources:

 “Economic Benefits of Increased Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in a National Managed Care Population in the United States” from the Journal of Insurance Medicine

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease Worldwide EP016


Wherever there is wheat, there is susceptibility to celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Gluten is a growing global problem, exacerbated by the popularity of the western diet around the world. This issue has personal, social and political implications as it places a significant economic burden on individuals, communities, and even entire nations.

 The Gluten Free RN brings us a ‘big picture’ perspective of the celiac and gluten sensitive population around the world, as we learn about how other countries support these individuals. She also covers the industries that have begun to recognize the power of the gluten free population as a consumer group.

 Nadine will be doing some globe-trotting herself come September for the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, and she is currently soliciting advice regarding where and how to eat safely during her travels in India and Thailand. Feel free to message her with recommendations!  

What’s Discussed: 

When and where wheat originated

  • Fertile Crescent (Northern Africa and the Middle East)
  • 10,000 years ago
  • High prevalence of celiac disease in these regions now

 The International Celiac Disease Symposium

  • September 2017 in New Delhi
  • Held every two years
  • Scientists, medical professionals and other interested parties
  • Share latest research

 Where celiac disease is common

  • Anywhere people are eating grains
  • More widespread as other regions adopt a western diet
  • Increased risk in Punjab population of India

 The basics of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Can present in many ways (300+ signs and symptoms)
  • #1 autoimmune disease in the world
  • More likely to recover the sooner identified
  • 30-50% of the population carry the genes (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8) that indicate predisposition
  • Body doesn’t have enzymes to break down gluten proteins
  • Gluten damages intestines
  • Nadine recommends adopting a Paleo diet in order to heal

 The World Health Organization’s “burden of disease”

  • Measures the impact of celiac disease
  • Based on financial cost, mortality, morbidity, etc.

 How Italy supports celiac patients

  • Provide extra days off work for doctor’s appointments, shopping
  • Ship gluten free food

 Potential symptoms of celiac disease affecting every ethnicity

  • Odd gait (gluten ataxia)
  • Skin rash (dermatitis herpetiformis)

 The power of celiac and gluten-sensitive patients as a group

  • Largest untapped market in the world
  • Some industries taking notice (pharmaceutical, food)
  • Use influence to heal selves and educate others

 Why some people are so resistant to eliminating grains

  • Sometimes crave what is bad for you
  • Nutritional deficiencies may cause addiction

 Resources Mentioned:

 Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies –  by Jared M. Diamond

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Emergency Preparedness with Nutrient Dense Foods EP015


It’s not a matter of if, but rather when you will encounter an emergency situation. And if you suffer from celiac disease or gluten intolerance, it is incredibly important that you are prepared with the appropriate supplies you will need to endure a hurricane, earthquake, blizzard, or other disaster.

 Nadine teaches you how to stock your cupboards with nutrient dense foods should you need to shelter in place for an extended period of time. She also outlines other essentials you will need to stay alive and assist others who may need help!

 What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s experience responding to Hurricane Katrina

  • People were unprepared
  • FEMA provided only cheap filler foods

 Why it’s important to stock nutrient dense foods in case of emergency

  • Alleviates stress
  • Allows you to feed yourself for a period of time

 Nadine’s list of nutrient dense foods to stock

  • Protein bars
  • Gelatin
  • Jerky (without soy, teriyaki sauce)
  • Canned tuna, sardines
  • Canned chicken, turkey
  • Protein powder
  • Seaweed
  • Nuts
  • Pumpkin seed butter
  • Chocolate bars (80-100% cocoa, no milk)
  • Many more! Listen for the full list!

How to cope with a loss of electricity

  • Consume foods stored in freezer first
  • Prioritize eating perishables

 The importance of being self-reliant during a time of emergency

  • Helps you avoid overburdened hospitals and clinics

 Other essentials to have on hand in case of emergency

  • Multi-vitamins
  • Prescription medications (keep list in wallet/purse)
  • Can opener
  • Heat source (paper, wood)
  • Sleeping bags, pillows and blankets
  • Flashlights w/ working batteries
  • Extra batteries
  • Socks and shoes
  • First aid kit
  • Waterproof containers
  • Gluten free shampoos, lotions
  • Extra contact lenses and solution/glasses
  • Cash
  • Pet food

 How to obtain water if forced to shelter in place

  • Utilize water heater

 Resources Mentioned:

 Country Life Vitamins

 Road ID

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Neurological Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity EP012


Nadine covers the neurological symptoms associated with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is primarily a neurological disorder, but the neurological symptoms are often misdiagnosed.

 Nadine shares her own story as well as client anecdotes regarding the neurological issues faced by celiac patients and those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. She outlines the common symptoms and discusses how to either slow their progression or eliminate them entirely.

Nadine explains the way gluten affects your neurological system and how a Paleo lifestyle can help you heal. Listen and understand how to get your brain back!

 What’s Discussed:

How an immobile patient misdiagnosed with MS was able to walk again

  • Inspired by Dr. Terry Wahls book, The Wahls Protocol, she adopted a Paleo diet
  • Food can be medicine or poison

Misdiagnoses given to people who actually suffered from gluten ataxia

  • Parkinson’s
  • ALS
  • MS
  • Psychosomatic disorder

Why experts advocate for including an AGA in celiac testing

  • It provides a biomarker for non-celiac gluten sensitivity

Why the neurological component of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity is so significant

  • The entire enteric nervous system is located in the bowels
  • Constipation and diarrhea occur when peristalsis is paralyzed due to gluten

The neurological symptoms of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

Why patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or dementia could be restored by a Paleo diet

  • An autopsy is the only way to definitively diagnose Alzheimer’s
  • Many patients have improved significantly after removing gluten from their diets

The components of a Paleo diet

  • Meats and fish
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Fruits and vegetables

How a Paleo lifestyle cleared Nadine’s neurological issues

  • Her balance issues went away
  • She no longer suffered frequent falls

The standard nutritional panels for a celiac patient

How glyphosates can cause leaky gut even in the absence of celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity

The health benefits Nadine has witnessed in patients who adopt a Paleo diet

  • No longer take prescription medication
  • Normal blood pressure
  • Desirable cholesterol level
  • Absorb nutrients appropriately
  • Body heals

 Resources Mentioned: 

 The Wahls Protocol by Dr. Terry Wahls

Discovery Health: Celiac Disease

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and How Gluten Affects Your Skin EP011


On this episode of the ‘Gluten Free RN,’ Nadine explains how gluten affects your skin. If you have celiac disease or a gluten intolerance, you may also suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis, a painful rash that is often misdiagnosed.

Nadine shares her struggle with DH and offers advice about eliminating gluten from both your diet and personal care regime in order to heal your skin. The only treatment for this issue is a 100% gluten-free diet.

Your skin is the largest organ in your body, so listen and learn how to keep it looking and feeling good!

What’s Discussed: 

The definition of Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH)

  • Blistering, vesicular rash that is typically round
  • Itchy, very painful and distracting
  • Caused by IgA deposits under the skin
  • May appear on hands, legs, back, armpits, buttocks, elbows, knees, scalp, torso and even eyes
  • Not contagious
  • The only treatment is a 100% gluten-free diet

 Nadine’s struggle with DH

  • Blisters, itchy and painful hands as a child
  • Irritated by latex gloves as a nurse, hands developed rash
  • Misdiagnosed by several dermatologists
  • DH finally identified by Dr. Abigail Haberman
  • Rash had exploded all over Nadine’s body and she was near death
  • Most of the rash resolved quickly after adopting a gluten-free diet

 Why steroid creams, long-term antibiotics and dapsone aren’t the answer

  • DH is an external expression of what’s happening internally
  • Topical creams don’t treat the underlying cause
  • Long-term antibiotics disrupt the microbiome and put you at risk for developing other infections
  • Dapsone is associated with serious side effects for the blood and liver
  • Removing gluten from your diet and personal care products is the only cure

 The importance of eliminating gluten from personal care products

  • Anything you put on your skin can travel through to your bloodstream
  • Discontinue the use of products that contain wheat, barley, rye or oats
  • Nadine also recommends eliminating products that contain chemicals such as lauryl sulfates and paraffins

 Resources Mentioned: 

YouTube: Your Skin on Gluten

Primal Pit Paste

ZuZu Luxe Cosmetics

Red Apple Lipstick

Desert Essence Organics

Gluten-Free Danube Cruise

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism