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Celiac Disease and its Associated Autoimmune Disorders EP010


This time on the ‘Gluten Free RN’ podcast, Nadine examines the many autoimmune disorders that are associated with celiac disease. Once you have acquired one autoimmune disease, your chances of developing another increase exponentially – Nadine had seven!

Nadine shares how she was able to heal the inflammation in her intestines that caused those autoimmune disorders and go from a positive ANA panel to a negative one in just a year on a Paleo diet.

Listen and understand which autoimmune diseases are linked to gluten intolerance and how to dodge those bullets by going gluten-free!

What’s Discussed: 

The chances of developing additional autoimmune disorders

  • Once you have one autoimmune disease, your chances of developing another are 30% -50% greater

Nadine’s ‘collection’ of autoimmune disorders

  • Raynaud’s phenomenon is a circulation issue that gave her purple/white hands and feet
  • Sjogren’s syndrome dried out her mucus membranes
  • She suffered from arthritis and joint pain
  • Alopecia caused her hair to thin and fall out

Why celiac disease is sometimes misdiagnosed as MS, ALS or Parkinson’s

How Dr. Terry Wahls went from a wheelchair to riding a bike by eliminating gluten

How it is possible for your body to heal the inflammation causing autoimmune disorders, regardless of what the medical establishment says

  • Remove the things that cause damage
  • Replace the nutrients your body needs

Additional autoimmune disorders associated with celiac disease

  • Liver disease (primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis)
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Addison’s disease
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Alopecia
  • Vitiligo
  • Neurological issues (gluten ataxia, peripheral neuropathies)
  • Connective tissue diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis)
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Autoimmune pericarditis
  • Psoriasis
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Pancreatitis
  • Microscopic colitis
  • Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
  • Wilson’s disease

The importance of checking magnesium RBC levels in cardiac patients

The genetic overlap between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

  • A study in Scotland found that 94% of Type 1 diabetics carry the HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 genes

Resources Mentioned: 

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles by Terry Wahls MD and Eve Adamson

Terry Wahls MD Research Study Update

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Regain and Maintain Your Health with a Paleo Diet EP009

This episode of the ‘Gluten Free RN’ podcast outlines the benefits of adopting a Paleo diet in order to regain and then maintain your health. Patients with celiac disease or gluten intolerance can get better, faster by choosing the Paleo option.

 Nadine shares how changing her eating habits had an incredibly positive impact on her health as she went from feeling better on a gluten-free diet to feeling fantastic on her own variation of a Paleo diet.

 Nadine gets specific about the foods you can and cannot eat and the incredible health benefits of going Paleo. Listen in and learn how to get back the health you deserve by focusing on good food!

 What’s Discussed: 

The foods to avoid on a Paleo diet

The foods you can eat on a Paleo diet

Nadine’s story

The concept of food as medicine

  • All disease starts in the gut

Where to locate organic fruits and vegetables and meat with no antibiotics/no hormones

The health benefits of a Paleo diet

  • Clears up lingering gluten issues
  • Helps achieve sustainable weight loss
  • Affords clearer, smoother skin
  • Improves the immune system
  • Allows for better sleep

The importance of sleep hygiene

  • Your body heals while you sleep
  • Eight to ten hours is optimal

Why fat is essential in absorbing nutrients

  • Vitamins A, D, E & K are fat soluble

The best sources of fat for nutrient absorption

  • Avocadoes
  • Grass fed meats
  • Olive oil or coconut oil
  • Nuts
  • Nut butters
  • Fish oil
  • Eggs

 Resources Mentioned: 

Paleo Magazine

The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet by Robb Wolf

Practical Paleo by Diane Sanfilippo

The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body by Sarah Ballantyne

Midway Farms http://www.midwayfarmsoregon.com/

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Intestinal Health and Antibiotic Resistant Threats EP008


This time on the ‘Gluten Free RN’ podcast, Nadine explores the connection between gluten intolerance and antibiotic-resistant threats. Because damaged intestines compromise the immune system, undiagnosed celiac patients are more likely to develop infections that necessitate antibiotics.

 Nadine summarizes the 2013 CDC report, Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, explaining the three microorganisms identified in the report with a Threat Level of Urgent. Listen and learn how to protect yourself and your family from the public health threat posed by these bacteria!

 What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease and gluten intolerance

  • 30-50% of the population carry the HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8 genes

The importance of healthy intestinal tissue

  • 70-90% of the immune system is in your intestines

The soldier analogy

  • Healthy villi are like rested soldiers with loaded weapons on a clear day who can easily take out antigens that don’t belong
  • Damaged villi are like soldiers on a bender with inadequate weaponry, operating in smoke and fire – they either don’t work at all or fire randomly at antigens

The need for a more judicious approach to prescribing antibiotics

  • Overuse of antibiotics wipes out good microbiome along with bad

How to rebuild microbiome

  • Kombucha
  • High-quality probiotics
  • Fermented foods
  • Apple cider vinegar

The need for IgA and IgG testing to complement a celiac panel

The public health threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria

  • The 2013 CDC report details 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths yearly

The connection between damaged intestines and a higher risk of bacterial infection requiring antibiotics

The three microorganisms with a Threat Level of Urgent

  • Clostridium difficile (causes profuse diarrhea, 14,000 deaths/year)
  • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (50% fatal, 600 deaths/year)
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae

The causes of inflammation in your intestines

  • Gluten
  • Dairy
  • Sugar

Why Nadine has concerns about the potential pandemic and huge loss of life presented by large numbers of undiagnosed celiac patients who are susceptible to bacterial infections

 Resources Mentioned: 

 CDC Report: Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013

Enterolab Website

Cyrex Laboratories Website

PubMed

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Symptoms of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance EP005


This time on ‘Gluten Free RN,’ Nadine continues to cover the basics of celiac disease and gluten intolerance, reviewing the consequences of intestinal damage and gluten in the bloodstream and discussing what you can and cannot eat as part of a gluten-free diet.

A registered nurse certified in emergency care and a celiac patient herself, Nadine is well-versed in

the health complications and symptoms you might experience with undiagnosed celiac disease or gluten intolerance, including neurological disorders, dermatologic difficulties and even mental health issues.

Join the Gluten Free RN on this podcast to learn the signs of undiagnosed celiac disease and gluten intolerance so that we can all be healthy and vital for years to come!

What’s Discussed: 

The definition of celiac disease and its chronic nature

  • Diagnosis requires HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8 genes and documented villous atrophy

The importance of healthy intestinal tissue

  • 70-90% of the immune system is in your intestines

Grains to avoid that contain gluten

  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Oats (due to cross-contamination)

Places where gluten may be hiding

Gluten-free, nutrient dense foods

Complications caused by gluten in patients with celiac disease or gluten intolerance

  • Chronic inflammation (suffering from an -itus of any kind)
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Damaged immune system
  • Malnutrition/deficiencies

The increased risk of cancer in patients with undiagnosed celiac disease

Symptoms doctors look for before testing for celiac disease

  • Chronic diarrhea
  • Malabsorption
  • Extreme weight loss or malnutrition

Components of the test for celiac disease

  • Blood test (celiac panel)
  • Biopsy of the small intestines

The amount of time it takes to regenerate damaged villi in the absence of gluten

  • Nadine recommends you continue the clinical trial of a gluten-free diet for at least six to 12 months

Additional signs of a possible gluten intolerance or celiac disease

Additional symptoms Nadine has encountered in undiagnosed patients

Indicators of gluten intolerance in children and elders

Resources Mentioned: 

Montana Gluten Free Website

Kite Hill Non-Dairy Foods

Gluten: Zero Global by Rodney Ford

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Intro to Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance EP004


This episode of ‘Gluten Free RN’ covers the basics of celiac disease and gluten intolerance – what those terms mean and what they might mean for you. Nadine explains which genes suggest a predisposition to gluten intolerance and what circumstances lead to a diagnosis of celiac disease proper.

 Nadine talks you through what happens in your digestive tract that leads to gluten proteins attacking your organs and preventing your body from absorbing the nutrients it needs. She also outlines the foods and products you need to avoid to achieve ‘gluten-zero,’ as well as the foods you can enjoy as part of a gluten-free diet.

 Listen in and learn where gluten is hiding and how to modify your diet to reverse the adverse effects of gluten!

What’s Discussed: 

  • The definition of celiac disease and its chronic nature
    • 30-50% of the population carries the genes
  • How a trigger event (i.e.: a cold, pregnancy, stress, an injury) initiates the autoimmune disorder
  • Options for getting tested for the genetic predisposition
  • The closed system of the digestive tractand how food is processed
    • While some food is used for energy, much just passes through
  • Villous atrophy and the four stages of tissue damage
    • Marsh 1: microvilli destroyed; body cannot break down sugar and milk
    • Marsh 2/3: villi themselves fold over or atrophy; tight junctures between villi (that keep things your body can’t utilize in the GI tract and out of your bloodstream) open up
    • Marsh 4: villi gone and only red, inflamed tissue remains; ‘leaky gut’
  • The effects of increased permeability of the intestinal wall
    • Damaged immune system
    • Rather than passing through the GI tract, gluten proteins get into bloodstream and wreak havoc on organs
    • Body can’t absorb nutrients out of food
  • The importance of healthy intestinal tissue
    • 70-90% of the immune system is in your intestines
  • The soldier analogy
    • Healthy villi are like rested soldiers with loaded weapons on a clear day who can easily take out antigens that don’t belong
    • Damaged villi are like soldiers on a bender with inadequate weaponry, operating in smoke and fire – they either don’t work at all or fire randomly at antigens
  • The long road to recovering from villous atrophy
    • It takes 6 months to a year to reverse the damage
  • Grains to avoid that contain gluten
    • Wheat
    • Barley
    • Rye
    • Oats (due to cross-contamination)
  • Places where gluten may be hiding
  • Gluten-free foods
    • Fresh fruits and vegetables
    • Plain meats and fish (not breaded or beer battered)
    • Beans/legumes
    • Tree nuts
    • Rice, corn and potatoes
    • Quinoa and teff
    • Dairy
  • What a gluten-free rating means
    • The Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) certifies products that contain less than ten parts per million

Resources Mentioned: 

Gluten: Zero Global by Rodney Ford

 Enterolab Website

 Glutenpro Celiac Test

 Country Life Vitamins

 Kite Hill Foods

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Food is Medicine – EP001

In the premier episode of ‘Gluten Free RN’ Nadine tells us a bit about her journey in regaining her health and why it’s so important to understand that food is medicine to our bodies. If we think about food as medicine, we will make better food choices which will lead to much better health in both the short and long term.

Nadine also discusses the increasing rate of Celiac disease diagnosis and some factors that may be influencing this.

Listen in to learn why it’s so important to make good food choices and how making the right ones will help you maintain or even regain your health!

What’s Discussed:

  • Nadine’s background
  • Nurse for 25 years, 10 years as the Gluten Free RN
  • At the time, Nadine didn’t know that gluten intolerance and Celiac disease were often big factors in her patients’ health problems
  • Why Nadine considers herself to be a “Connectologist”
  • Nadine connects some dots that may not have been previously connected
  • Why Gluten sensitivity and/or Celiac disease is often common denominator in health problems
  • Why food is medicine and how that affects our health
  • Nadine’s journey back from bad health
  • Learned she had Celiac disease at the age of 40
  • Your GI Tract and immune system
  • 70-90 % of your immune system is in your GI tract
  • As humans, we do not have do not have enzymes to break down gluten proteins
  • Why you may be predisposed to Celiac disease
  • 30-50% of our population carries the genes that predispose us to Celiac disease
  • The increasing rate of Celiac disease diagnosis
  • The importance of having a plan for remaining or getting healthy into your 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s
  • It’s easier to maintain your health than to regain it
  • Nadine’s diet recommendations
  • Common problems of a bad diet
  • Topics that will be discussed in future episodes!

Resources Mentioned: 

Seeds of Deception” by Jeffery Smith

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

 

groundbreaker

GF Beer in Portland

There is now a dedicated gluten free brewery out of Portland Oregon!

Ground Breaker Brewing is a dedicated gluten-free craft brewery founded in 2011. Ground Breaker Brewing’s facility is entirely gluten-free, no gluten is allowed on the premises. The main ingredient used in the beers are Willamette valley chestnuts which are hand roasted at the brewery to different degrees for each style of beer. It is located at 2030 SE 7th Ave, Portland, OR 97214.

For more information on Harvester Brewery and for information on where to buy their beer please visit groundbreakerbrewing.com, or facebook.com/groundbreakerbrewing.

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GF Travel in Europe

We received these recommendations from one of our readers who recently traveled throughout Europe. Her advice is useful to anyone with gluten intolerance traveling in Europe:

In France, Belgium and Germany I found gluten-free products fairly easy to source in the larger supermarkets and natural food/vitamin stores. The larger markets had entire end displays or aisle sections devoted to gluten free, natural and organic foods, sometimes mixed in with or located near the diet foods. The larger, newer, fancier supermarkets also offered deli-style, to-go foods like green salads, small cold cut plates, veggie plates, etc. which worked well for me. One large, multi-country market chain we found is Carrefour. The one we stopped in offered a wide variety of GF products.

Many of the processed, ready-to-eat gluten free products like cookies and crackers also indicated lactose free. In addition, they offered breads, snacks, baking mixes, pastas and more.

Look for “gluten frei” or “laktose frei” on German product labels or “sans gluten” or “sans lactose” on French labels. Travelers to Spain will want “sin gluten” and “sin lactosa” products.

Soy products abounded, including yogurts and puddings.

Whereas in Corvallis I see GF-friendly shelves with a variety of items from many different manufacturers, in France/Belgium/Germany there appeared to be products from one or two companies – an extensive, in-depth selection from each company. See the photos for better understanding.

Recommendations:

  • I wish I would have taken some peanut butter for easy protein and GF salad dressing for restaurant use or to-go salads.
  • I carried a small bottle of Lactaid pills, and they helped to bail me out of some tricky food situations.
  • I carried Tums, gas pills and stool softeners – all of which I’d recommend to GF travelers.
  • I packed some GF instant oatmeal packets which saved the day more than once when I couldn’t eat what was offered for breakfast (normally bread with butter, yogurt and coffee with milk) or was available in the dining car on the train. It was pretty easy to ask for a cup of hot water and a spoon.
  • And, I carried some Lara and Kind bars, plus some protein packets to mix into juice.

In restaurants it was more challenging to find truly safe foods. Although I asked for salads with no dressing, requesting oil and vinegar to be separate, I usually ended up with vinaigrette dressing served separately in a small bowl. I couldn’t get them to understand the separate oil and vinegar option. In asking how meat was prepared, and requesting no butter or cream or sauce, my tummy often told me after the fact that instead of pure oil, there had been cross-contamination on the grill or perhaps the cook had used some sort of dairy product in the preparation.

I would recommend taking some note cards in different languages explaining GF/LF needs so the waitress and the cook can clearly understand what you can and cannot eat.

Generally safe foods I found readily available in restaurants were green salads, steak, and French fries in France and Belgium. In Germany I relied on sausages and pork, sauerkraut, boiled potatoes, green salad. Occasionally I found roast or grilled chicken.

Requesting meals

You can also request gluten free or special diet meals on the airplane if you do so at least 48-hours ahead of time. But, pack some safe food just in case! One flight worked well for me with veggies-rice-grilled chicken, fruit cup and green salad…and one didn’t work at all due to a lack of the online request form not getting processed – so they had no GF meal for me.

We stayed in two B&B’s in France which offered dinner made with local, garden-fresh ingredients. We made dinner reservations with them, and I let each hostess know about my GF/LF issues. I asked that they make their regular foods, saying I’d just eat what I could – not wanting to be a problem child… but also not wanting the hostess to think I didn’t like her meal if it was something I could not eat. BOTH hostesses made delicious dinners that were all or primarily all gluten and lactose free! J

Update 2015: Here’s a site to check out for travel in the UK: http://www.go-gluten-free-wheat-free.co.uk/