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The Relationship Between the Respiratory System and Celiac Disease EP028


The average human takes between 14 and 20 breaths per minute. But if you are conscious of those breaths, that’s a problem. Perhaps you’re experiencing chest tightness, clogged sinuses or a nagging cough that make you very aware of every breath you take. If so, the ingestion of gluten may be a contributing factor to these respiratory issues.

Today Nadine explores the relationship between the lungs and celiac disease, offering anecdotal evidence as well as explaining the way that inflammation can lead to a number of respiratory problems. Because 70-90% of your immune system is housed in your intestines, it is no surprise that a leaky gut could make you more vulnerable to respiratory tract infections.

Despite the fact that current literature considers respiratory challenges to be an atypical presentation of celiac disease, the Gluten Free RN argues that there is enough anecdotal evidence to merit further study. Listen in to understand the vitamin deficiencies that likely contribute to respiratory issues, how those health concerns might be corrected by going gluten-free, and why your body heals more quickly on a high fat, whole food diet. It’s time to go gluten-free and breathe easy again!

What’s Discussed: 

How gluten ingestion likely affects the respiratory system

  • Body keeps fluids separate unless tissues leaky
  • Gluten alters epithelial tissue, including that of lungs

Nadine’s anecdotal evidence of a connection between gluten and respiratory issues

  • Fellow nurse had lung removed as child
  • Always needed inhalers
  • Went gluten-free with Nadine
  • Inflammation in lungs cleared, asthma gone
  • No longer needed inhalers

Respiratory issues that may be corrected on a gluten-free diet

  • Anemia (lack of red blood cells to carry oxygen causes shortness of breath with minimal exertion)
  • Recurrent respiratory infections
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • COPD
  • IPH (bleeding lung)
  • Pulmonary edema

Vitamin deficiencies caused by gluten ingestion that lead to respiratory problems

  • Vitamin K deficiencies initiate easy bruising, nose bleeds and bleeding lung

Why going gluten-free eliminates many respiratory issues

  • Gluten causes inflammation (-itis = inflammation)
  • Removing the cause heals intestines, repairs immune system
  • Patients operate on a higher level

Common symptoms of respiratory issues

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Chest tightness
  • Nagging cough
  • Clogged sinuses
  • Post-nasal drip

Nadine’s recommendations around diet and nutrition

  • Gluten- and dairy-free at a minimum
  • Ideally variation of Paleo diet
  • Whole foods (meat, fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds)
  • High fat (body needs to absorb fat-soluble nutrients – A, D, E & K)
  • Maintain Gluten Zero (takes six months to a year for intestinal villi to heal)

Why your body heals more quickly on a high fat, whole food diet

  • Body knows how to break down, utilize nutrients
  • Fat-soluble vitamins repair connective tissue, leaky gut

The genes that indicate a predisposition for celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Resources:

“Hemoptysis in Patients of Celiac Disease with Disproportionately Severe Anemia” in Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine

“A Case of Cough, Lymphocytic Bronchoalveolitis and Coeliac Disease with Improvement Following a Gluten Free Diet” in Thorax

“Respiratory Symptoms as Atypical Manifestation of Celiac Disease” in the Pediatric Oncall Journal

“Recurrent Rhinitis and Pulmonary Infections Revealing Celiac Disease” in Revue de Pneumologie Clinique

“Pneumococcal Septic Shock in the Setting of Hyposplenic Celiac Disease” in Hospital Physician

Coeliac Australia: Associated Conditions

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and the Media EP026

The gluten-free movement is often dismissed in the media as a fad. Even so-called experts actively discredit the gluten-free diet and apply a negative connotation to terms like PWAG. Have you ever wondered why there is so much misinformation about celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the media? And who sponsors the coverage that dissuades people from going gluten-free?

 Today, Nadine explains how the big business of wheat affects which voices we hear in media treatment of the gluten-free movement. In addition, she covers how the for-profit healthcare system in the US affects the timely diagnosis of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

 Celiac disease is a medical, social and economic issue with political implications. Listen and learn how to choose high quality, nutrient dense foods, and leverage your power as a gluten-free consumer!

What’s Discussed: 

Misinformation in the media

  • Some coverage dissuades from adopting a gluten-free diet
  • Program/print sponsors may be corporations that depend on people eating wheat
  • Wheat/grain industry threatened by rise of gluten-free diet (33% of people in US and Canada on variation of gluten free diet)

The illusion of options in the area of food production

  • 8-10 corporations own nearly every food company
  • Nadine patronizes farmer’s markets, co-ops and local companies

Nadine’s rules for buying food products

  • Label must be clear, easy to read
  • Five or fewer ingredients
  • Must be able to picture each ingredient

The importance of reading labels

  • May be gluten in products that are typically gluten-free (i.e.: pesto, kombucha)
  • Companies are given six months to update labels after making changes
  • Barley and rye are not on list of allergens

Nadine’s story

  • Multi-system organ failure
  • Negative test for celiac disease despite being homozygous gene carrier
  • Healed quickly on a Paleo diet

Why countries with universal healthcare take celiac disease seriously

  • Early diagnosis saves money
  • Finland: 70% of people w/ celiac disease have been diagnosed
  • Italy, UK and Canada: 30-40% have been diagnosed
  • US: Less than 1% of those with celiac disease have been diagnosed

How long it takes to be diagnosed with celiac disease (for-profit vs. universal systems)

  • US: 9-15 years
  • Italy: 2-3 weeks

How doctors/experts discredit gluten-free as a fad

  • Use PWAG as derogatory term
  • Placebo effect
  • Nocebo effect (expect to feel poorly)

The inaccuracy of blood tests for celiac disease

  • 70% false negative

How companies profit from undiagnosed celiac patients

  • Products geared toward people with health issues (i.e.: compression socks, hypoallergenic sheets)

The prominence of wheat as a publicly traded commodity

  • Top export of US/Canada

The health risk associated with genetically modified wheat

The benefits of a gluten-free diet

  • Symptoms resolve
  • No longer need medicine, surgery

Nadine’s advice re: selecting gluten-free products

  • Avoid nutrient deficient gluten-free options (cheap fillers, empty carbs)
  • Focus on high quality, nutrient dense foods

How to leverage your power as a gluten-free consumer

  • Hold food producers accountable (standards, production methods)
  • ‘Vote carefully with your dollar’
  • Speak up when you see inaccurate media coverage

Why you cannot assume that gluten-free menu items are truly free of gluten

  • Uneducated restaurant staff
  • Possibility of contamination, cross-contamination

What a ‘gluten free’ designation means in labeling

  • GIG certification indicates less than ten parts per million
  • Standard in US/Europe is less than 20 parts per million

The Gluten Free RN mission

  • Educate people globally about celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity
  • Empower people to improve their health and quality of life with food

Resources:

Food Company Infographic

Gluten Intolerance Group

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Cardiac Issues Associated with Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance EP023


Given the choice between a heart transplant and a gluten-free diet, the vast majority – if not all – of us would quickly opt for the diet! Yet the medical community continues to ignore celiac disease as a potential cause of cardiac complications, despite documented connections between the two conditions.

The Gluten Free RN is sharing her experience with heart attack and stroke victims in the ER, and discussing the necessity of screening cardiac patients for celiac disease. She gets into the nitty gritty of how intestinal damage leads to nutrient deficiencies that affect the cardiac system, and reveals the cardiac symptoms that may resolve on a gluten-free diet.

Listen in and learn about the actual cause of heart attack and stroke (spoiler alert – it’s not high cholesterol) and how Nadine has achieved a lipid panel akin to that of a ‘23-year-old marathon runner’!

What’s Discussed: 

The connection between cardiac issues and celiac disease

  • Study linked celiac disease to almost doubled risk of CAD
  • Documented connection between gluten and cardiomyopathy

The real cause of heart attack and stroke

  • Thought to be high cholesterol
  • Actual cause is inflammation/malabsorption

How a gluten-free diet can resolve cardiomyopathy

  • Medical community claims cardiomyopathy can be treated with meds, but not cured
  • Patient eventually needs heart transplant
  • Anecdotal evidence proves that removing gluten may cure profound heart failure

Nadine’s experience in treating cardiac patients as a critical care nurse in the ER

  • ER staff does not take a magnesium panel
  • Deficiencies in magnesium or calcium can cause arrhythmias (irregular heartbeat)
  • Even when patient tested for ‘everything,’ celiac disease and nutritional panels often omitted

How to correct a magnesium deficiency

  • Food (pumpkin seeds, molasses, etc.)
  • Magnesium supplements (including calcium, zinc and vitamin D)

How intestinal damage leads to nutrient deficiencies that affect the cardiac system

  • Thiamine deficiency may lead to wet beriberi or acute pernicious beriberi
  • Low electrolytes may lead to arrhythmia
  • Low iron, B vitamin may lead to anemia (less oxygen in blood)
  • Low vitamin K levels affects protein S and protein C levels (involved in clotting)

Cardiac symptoms that may resolve on a gluten-free or Paleo diet

  • Arrhythmias
  • Chest pain
  • Difficulty breathing

The myth that fat is bad for us

  • Nadine consumes a super-good high fat diet
  • Her lipid panel ‘looks like a 23-year-old marathon runners’
  • Cardiac risk factor very low

Nadine’s call for a worldwide mass screening for celiac disease

  • Find undiagnosed
  • Prevent cardiac disease, stroke

Resources:

“Celiac Disease Linked to Almost Doubled Risk of CAD” by Marlene Busko

PubMed

Gluten Toxicity: The Mysterious Symptoms of Celiac Disease, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance by Shelly L. Stuart

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Connection Between Undiagnosed Celiac Disease and Sleep Disorders EP022


We all know how it feels to struggle through the day when you didn’t get enough sleep the night before. Your brain feels fuzzy, it’s tough to focus, and you simply aren’t the best version of yourself! The good news is, there may be a simple explanation for your sleep disorder – and there are steps you can take to eliminate the potential celiac symptoms that are keeping you up at night.

Today the Gluten Free RN shares her struggle with sleep deprivation as an undiagnosed celiac patient who also worked the night shift in the ER. Find out how she leveraged a Paleo diet and went from having a contentious relationship with sleep to becoming a champion ‘Olympic Sleeper’ who enjoys at least eight hours of rest every night!

She also covers the components of an ideal sleep space, suggestions for implementing an evening routine, and the benefits of a good night’s rest. Listen and learn about the connection between sleep disorders and undiagnosed celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s struggle with sleep working the night shift

  • 10 years as ER nurse working 12-hour night shifts
  • Difficult to shift into normal sleep pattern on days off
  • Circadian rhythm thrown off, felt fuzzy-brained
  • Needed extra sleep
  • Struggle to block out distractions

The correlation between undiagnosed celiac disease and sleep disorders

  • Celiac symptoms can keep you awake at night
  • May experience joint pain, muscle pain, DH, eczema, headaches, muscle twitches, restless leg syndrome

How a Paleo lifestyle can alleviate symptoms preventing sleep

How many hours of sleep you should be getting each night

  • Nadine recommends 8-10 hours of good quality sleep
  • Provides the energy for your body to carry out the tasks of daily living

The components of an ideal sleep space

  • Comfortable mattress
  • Quality sheets
  • Plenty of supportive pillows
  • Appropriate temperature
  • Fresh air, if possible
  • No electronic equipment in the room (i.e.: phones, televisions, computers)
  • Source of white noise (e.g.: fan, music)

The model evening routine

  • Limit screen time in the hours before bed
  • Try relaxing activities like reading or knitting instead
  • Take a warm bath with Epsom salt (muscle relaxer, source of magnesium)
  • Consider magnesium supplements

Celiac symptoms that can cause sleep apnea

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

The repercussions of vitamin C deficiency

Signs of sleep disorders in children that may be caused by undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Can’t or don’t want to go to sleep, crying
  • Cranky and fatigued during the day
  • Decreased productivity
  • Learning disabilities
  • Difficulty with focus

Signs of celiac disease in children

  • Short stature
  • Anemia
  • Falling off growth chart
  • Learning disabilities
  • Seizure disorders

Why anyone with sleep disorders should get tested for celiac disease

How Nadine’s sleep issues went away on a gluten-free diet

  • Eliminated back pain, joint pain, skin discomfort, muscle pain, muscle spasms and leg cramps
  • Now she qualifies as an ‘Olympic Sleeper’

The unhealthy approach to compensating for lack of sleep

  • Take in stimulants to make it through the day (e.g.: coffee, sugar)
  • Take depressants at night to help fall asleep (e.g.: alcohol, prescription meds)
  • Everything you consume impacts your health and ability to sleep

A healthy option that functions as a sleep aid

The benefits of a good night’s rest

When to take multivitamins

  • In the morning with food
  • At night before bed (absorbed differently)

The risks associated with prescription medications

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Potential Connection Between Parkinson’s and Celiac Disease EP021


A diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is devastating, and the associated symptoms – difficulty walking, tremors, memory issues – are debilitating. But what if those symptoms aren’t necessarily indicative of Parkinson’s after all? What if a simple diet change could improve or even eliminate those symptoms?

Today Nadine explores anecdotal evidence suggesting that the symptoms of Parkinson’s and other demyelination syndromes might be actually be caused by celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. She argues that as Parkinson’s diagnoses become more and more common, it is imperative that we explore the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease.

Listen in to understand how gluten can affect the neurological system, why Parkinson’s patients should be tested for celiac disease, and how a gluten-free diet can heal neurological damage.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s Parkinson’s patient

  • Diagnosed with celiac disease as a child in the 1940’s
  • Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s
  • Symptoms included difficulty walking, falling, stooped gait, masked appearance, tremors, memory issues and confusion
  • Discovered unintentional gluten exposure in the home
  • Moved to adult foster home to ensure gluten-free diet
  • Many symptoms went away
  • Working with neurologist to wean off Parkinson’s meds

Why patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s, ALS and MS should get test for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

  • Every nerve in the body is insulated with myelin
  • Myelin is made of fat
  • Gluten prevents the absorption of fats
  • Parkinson’s, ALS and MS are all demyelination syndromes

The need for research regarding the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease

  • The University of Chicago asserts there is ‘no published evidence of a connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease’
  • Nadine argues that enough anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that a connection should be investigated

Nadine’s recommendation for a comprehensive celiac lab test

  • Cyrex Labs tests for 25 of the gluten intolerant antibodies, including tTG-2, tTG-3 and tTG-6
  • Ask for a total IgA and IgG in addition to the Cyrex Array 3
  • Insurance should cover the tests
  • Can be ordered by any practitioner

Celiac diagnoses in patients over 60

  • 30% of newly diagnosed celiac patients are over 60
  • Many have neurological issues
  • Neuropathy
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Seizure disorders
  • Difficulty walking
  • Falling
  • Balance issues
  • MS
  • Nadine’s patients improve on a Paleo diet

The Stanford idiopathic familial narcolepsy study

  • Entire family diagnosed with narcolepsy
  • Found that family members had celiac disease
  • Adopting a gluten-free diet eliminated the narcolepsy
  • Family now runs organic farm

The increasing number of Parkinson’s diagnoses

  • More and more common
  • UK neurological expert routinely tests for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

  • Heal intestines
  • Eliminate inflammation
  • Repair immune system
  • Replete nutrient deficiencies

Vitamin D

  • Cancer preventative
  • Level should be between 60-80
  • Indicator of all fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • ‘Sunshine’ vitamin synthesized through skin
  • Must also be taken in dietarily
  • Little chance of overdosing on D3

What your nails can tell you about your health

  • Look for white spots, cracked nails, hangnails
  • May indicate lack of zinc, D3, or B vitamins

Dr. Terry Wahls’ MS misdiagnosis

  • Diagnosed with MS and required wheelchair
  • Healed with a gluten-free diet
  • Can ride her bike and walk without a cane

Nadine’s story

  • At 40, her symptoms suggested MS
  • Issues with clumsiness (falling, dragging feet, dropping things, difficulty with balance)
  • Problems went away on a gluten-free diet
  • Nutrient deficiencies were causing neurological issues

Celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Caused by lesions on or inflammation of the brain
  • Results in inability to walk straight
  • Tissue can be healed on a gluten free diet

 Resources:

Cyrex Laboratories

Midway Farms

La Mancha Ranch and Orchard

Dr. Wahls’ TED Talk

Dr. Wahls’ YouTube Channel

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles – by Terry Wahls, MD and Eve Adamson

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Down, Turner and Williams Syndrome EP018

The medical community has an obligation to protect vulnerable populations, speaking up for any group that may not be able to advocate for themselves, and patients with Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome certainly fall into this category. Yet one facet of their health – one that could vastly improve quality of life – often goes overlooked.

There is a high prevalence of celiac disease among individuals with Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome, and it is recommended that these patients get tested annually. Unfortunately, many of the symptoms of celiac disease are attributed to the syndrome instead, and gluten sensitivity goes undiagnosed.

Today Nadine shares several case studies as well as her own experience working with patients with developmental delays. She covers the high incidence of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome patients, the signs and symptoms of gluten damage, and the importance of annual screening in this population.

What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in individuals with Down, Tuner and Williams syndrome

  • Annual testing is recommended
  • Signs and symptoms can be eliminated with a gluten-free diet

Tiffany’s story

  • Williams syndrome patient
  • Suffered from stage 4 liver failure and diabetes
  • Endured cracked, bleeding skin and fluid in the abdomen
  • Tested positive for celiac disease
  • Gluten-free diet resolved most of her symptoms

Alternatives to the standard blood test that could reveal non-celiac gluten sensitivity in Down syndrome patients

  • The anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) is an excellent biomarker
  • In a study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, 41% of Down syndrome patients had AGA antibodies

 The importance of testing family members

  • A mother who is malnourished during pregnancy may have a child with Down, Turner or Williams syndrome
  • Celiac disease may disrupt fetal development

The overlap of celiac disease and Down syndrome

  • Study found that 18 of 284 subjects ages two to 15 tested positive for celiac disease
  • In another study, 11 of 47 had positive blood tests

Symptoms of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Gas
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Short stature
  • Brittle bones
  • Osteoporosis
  • Osteopenia
  • Thyroid issues
  • Anemia
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Skin rash
  • Decreased appetite
  • Yeast overgrowth
  • Lichen planus
  • Difficulty swallowing

Nadine’s story of an autistic patient

  • Sweet gentleman who lived in group home
  • Suffered from diabetes, repeated infections and self-harm
  • Paleo diet made him calmer, didn’t irritate his throat
  • He enjoyed an improved quality of life

Cases of asymptomatic celiac disease in children with Down syndrome

  • Study published in the International Journal of Pediatrics
  • Toddlers screened at around 24 months
  • Biopsy proven celiac disease identified in 3-9% of children with Down syndrome
  • Not all patients with positive screens receive a biopsy if asymptomatic
  • One child in the study gained weight and energy on a gluten-free diet
  • A second child had less constipation and diarrhea
  • Follow-up study reported that 66% had health improvement

Resources Mentioned:

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Down’s Syndrome Patients Revealed Cases of Subtotal Villous Atrophy Without Typical for Celiac Disease HLA-DQ and Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies” from the World Journal of Gastroenterology

“Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Down’s Syndrome” from the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

“Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less” from the International Journal of Pediatrics

Other Resources:

“Celiac Disease” from the Pediatric Gastroenterology Board Review Manual

“The Coexistence of Down Syndrome and a Triad Consisting of: Coeliac Disease, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus and Congenital Hypothyroidism” from Down Syndrome Research and Practice

“Coeliac Disease in Williams Syndrome” from the Journal of Medical Genetics

“Turner Syndrome and Celiac Disease: A Case-Control Study” from Pediatrics

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Recommended Labs and Follow-up for Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance EP014


Freeze your poop and mail it to Texas!

 In all seriousness, a stool analysis can offer vital information about your body’s absorption of fat and nutrients, and today the Gluten Free RN explains the significance of knowing your fecal fat score and other baseline labs that can offer clues about how gluten has adversely affected your health.

Nadine outlines recommended labs for celiac disease and gluten intolerance, discussing how each test can inform the way you tweak your diet or add necessary supplements to your health care routine. She also reviews the importance of follow-up labs to track how you are healing and help you get better, faster!

 What’s Discussed: 

The importance of standardization in celiac testing and follow-up labs

 Things to consider re: the results of a celiac panel

  • 70% produce a false negative
  • A positive test guarantees intestinal damage
  • Lab to lab variability can be problematic
  • Must include total IgA and IgG
  • Interpretation can be problematic
  • Ask for a hard copy of your results

 Why a “gluten challenge” is dangerous

  • No medical or social reason to do so
  • May cause organ damage

 Additional tests that can offer valuable information

  • Fecal fat score (ask for #, over 300 indicates malabsorption)
  • Complete blood count
  • Comprehensive metabolic panel
  • Vitamin D3 level (below 40 ng/ml is critically low)
  • Vitamins A, E & K levels
  • Vitamin B6 & B12 levels
  • MTHFR gene test
  • Magnesium RBC test
  • Zinc level
  • Iodine level
  • B9/Folate level
  • Ferritin level
  • Iron level
  • Thyroid panel
  • Bone density test
  • Lipid panel
  • ANA test (autoimmune issues)
  • ESR test
  • CRP test

 How to obtain reimbursement for labs

 Why a diet change is preferable to medication in lowering cholesterol

  • Statin drugs don’t treat the underlying cause of chronic inflammation
  • Still at risk for heart attack and stroke

 What a stool analysis can tell you about your microbiome

 Why you should avoid food allergy testing in the first year of a gluten-free diet

 Resources Mentioned:

 Cyrex Labs

 EnteroLab 

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and How Gluten Affects Your Skin EP011


On this episode of the ‘Gluten Free RN,’ Nadine explains how gluten affects your skin. If you have celiac disease or a gluten intolerance, you may also suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis, a painful rash that is often misdiagnosed.

Nadine shares her struggle with DH and offers advice about eliminating gluten from both your diet and personal care regime in order to heal your skin. The only treatment for this issue is a 100% gluten-free diet.

Your skin is the largest organ in your body, so listen and learn how to keep it looking and feeling good!

What’s Discussed: 

The definition of Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH)

  • Blistering, vesicular rash that is typically round
  • Itchy, very painful and distracting
  • Caused by IgA deposits under the skin
  • May appear on hands, legs, back, armpits, buttocks, elbows, knees, scalp, torso and even eyes
  • Not contagious
  • The only treatment is a 100% gluten-free diet

 Nadine’s struggle with DH

  • Blisters, itchy and painful hands as a child
  • Irritated by latex gloves as a nurse, hands developed rash
  • Misdiagnosed by several dermatologists
  • DH finally identified by Dr. Abigail Haberman
  • Rash had exploded all over Nadine’s body and she was near death
  • Most of the rash resolved quickly after adopting a gluten-free diet

 Why steroid creams, long-term antibiotics and dapsone aren’t the answer

  • DH is an external expression of what’s happening internally
  • Topical creams don’t treat the underlying cause
  • Long-term antibiotics disrupt the microbiome and put you at risk for developing other infections
  • Dapsone is associated with serious side effects for the blood and liver
  • Removing gluten from your diet and personal care products is the only cure

 The importance of eliminating gluten from personal care products

  • Anything you put on your skin can travel through to your bloodstream
  • Discontinue the use of products that contain wheat, barley, rye or oats
  • Nadine also recommends eliminating products that contain chemicals such as lauryl sulfates and paraffins

 Resources Mentioned: 

YouTube: Your Skin on Gluten

Primal Pit Paste

ZuZu Luxe Cosmetics

Red Apple Lipstick

Desert Essence Organics

Gluten-Free Danube Cruise

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Intestinal Health and Antibiotic Resistant Threats EP008


This time on the ‘Gluten Free RN’ podcast, Nadine explores the connection between gluten intolerance and antibiotic-resistant threats. Because damaged intestines compromise the immune system, undiagnosed celiac patients are more likely to develop infections that necessitate antibiotics.

 Nadine summarizes the 2013 CDC report, Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, explaining the three microorganisms identified in the report with a Threat Level of Urgent. Listen and learn how to protect yourself and your family from the public health threat posed by these bacteria!

 What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of undiagnosed celiac disease and gluten intolerance

  • 30-50% of the population carry the HLA-DQ2 and/or DQ8 genes

The importance of healthy intestinal tissue

  • 70-90% of the immune system is in your intestines

The soldier analogy

  • Healthy villi are like rested soldiers with loaded weapons on a clear day who can easily take out antigens that don’t belong
  • Damaged villi are like soldiers on a bender with inadequate weaponry, operating in smoke and fire – they either don’t work at all or fire randomly at antigens

The need for a more judicious approach to prescribing antibiotics

  • Overuse of antibiotics wipes out good microbiome along with bad

How to rebuild microbiome

  • Kombucha
  • High-quality probiotics
  • Fermented foods
  • Apple cider vinegar

The need for IgA and IgG testing to complement a celiac panel

The public health threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria

  • The 2013 CDC report details 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths yearly

The connection between damaged intestines and a higher risk of bacterial infection requiring antibiotics

The three microorganisms with a Threat Level of Urgent

  • Clostridium difficile (causes profuse diarrhea, 14,000 deaths/year)
  • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (50% fatal, 600 deaths/year)
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae

The causes of inflammation in your intestines

  • Gluten
  • Dairy
  • Sugar

Why Nadine has concerns about the potential pandemic and huge loss of life presented by large numbers of undiagnosed celiac patients who are susceptible to bacterial infections

 Resources Mentioned: 

 CDC Report: Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013

Enterolab Website

Cyrex Laboratories Website

PubMed

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Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism