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Alex Michaels from LPI on Vitamin C EP053

You know that vitamin C is good for you. It is necessary for the growth, development and repair of all your body tissues, and it plays a role in the healthy functioning of your immune system. But evidence shows that the RDA—90mg for men and 75mg for women—may be woefully inadequate. And if you are suffering from certain types of cancer or sepsis, vitamin C may be the key to recovery.

 The Gluten Free RN is joined by vitamin C researcher Alex Michaels from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University to discuss the latest developments in vitamin C, explaining how intravenous vitamin C works to kill certain cancer cells and reverses the organ failure associated with sepsis. He also covers the difference between vitamin C inadequacy and vitamin C deficiency and the debilitating symptoms of scurvy.

 Nadine and Alex speak to the best food sources of vitamin C and how it impacts other vitamins and minerals like iron and copper. Alex offers his advice around how much vitamin C you should get on a daily basis and explains why synthetic and natural vitamin C are identical. Learn about the LPI mission to determine the optimal ranges of micronutrients and phytochemicals you should be getting on a daily basis and how you can benefit from their research!

What’s Discussed:

Micronutrients vs. macronutrients

  • Micronutrients are vitamins, essential minerals needed in small amounts (milligrams or micrograms/day)
  • Macronutrients include fats, carbs and proteins (grams/day)
  • Phytochemicals come from plants, affect health but not essential nutrients

 The difference between intravenous and oral vitamin C

  • Intravenous bypasses GI system, high concentration in bloodstream (up to 100 grams)
  • Body can only absorb certain amount of oral vitamin C, inflammation may prevent absorption

 Vitamin C’s resurgence as a cancer therapy

  • High levels of intravenous vitamin C can covert oxygen to hydrogen peroxide
  • Hydrogen peroxide floods and kills some cancer cells (e.g.: pancreatic tumors)

 Vitamin C’s role in the treatment of sepsis

  • Reverses organ failure, decreases inflammation
  • May restore vitamin C to normal levels, protect from negative effects of iron

 The availability of intravenous vitamin C

  • Difficult to obtain, naturopaths usually have dedicated supplier
  • More readily available in Australia, New Zealand

 The fundamentals of scurvy

  • Defined as deficiency in vitamin C
  • Symptoms include bleeding gums, corkscrew hair growth, open wounds, malaise and low energy
  • Very rare in western world, would have to go without any fruits or vegetables for months
  • May have vitamin C inadequacy without any outward signs of problem

 The best food sources of vitamin C

  • Chili peppers
  • Tropical fruits (papayas, Kakadu plum, camu camu)

 Factors that are known to denigrate vitamin C

  • Heat, light and air
  • Mechanical disruption (i.e.: juicer)
  • Basic pH (anything above 7)
  • Enzymatic factors
  • Iron, copper

 How vitamin C impacts other vitamins and minerals

  • Enhances iron absorption, some must be careful of iron overload
  • Synthetic vitamin C may deplete copper concentration

 Alex’s take on the appropriate daily intake of vitamin C

  • 400 mg/day recommended
  • RDA much too low

Resources:

Linus Pauling Institute

Micronutrient Information Center

LPI on Facebook

LPI on Twitter

LPI on LinkedIn

LPI on Pinterest

Biochemical, Physiological, and Molecular Aspects of Human Nutrition by Martha H. Stipanuk PhD and Marie A. Caudill

Cancer and Vitamin C by Ewan Cameron and Linus Pauling

Dr. Paul Marik on NPR

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The 2017 International Celiac Disease Symposium Recap #1 EP042

In his opening talk at the 2017 International Celiac Disease Symposium, celiac expert Dr. Abul Abbas of UC San Francisco said, “We are drowning in data, but thirsting for information.” Though there is still much debate around celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (even among global experts), the featured ICDS speakers sifted through the numbers to help practitioners interpret what the latest studies can tell us about the negative effects of gluten and how celiac disease presents in populations all over the world.

Today the globetrotting Gluten Free RN is coming to us from Thailand, after attending the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, India. Armed with the latest information from the ICDS clinical forum, Nadine covers talks given by Dr. Abbas on gluten and the immunological system, and Dr. Alessio Fasano on the spectrum of gluten-related disorders. She relays information regarding the barriers researchers face in studying autoimmune disease as well as gluten’s negative impact on body tissue, including that of our brain.

Nadine also shares the most up-to-date statistics around the big business that is celiac disease and the increasing prevalence of gluten intolerance in the US and Asia. She discusses the importance of celiac testing in patients with other autoimmune and neurological disorders and the need for a global education campaign. Listen as Nadine educates you about what gluten is, where it hides, what you can do to avoid it, and how to undo the damage and get healthy again!

What’s Discussed:

The challenge of eating gluten-free in India

The highlights of Dr. Abul Abbas’ talk on the immunological system

  • Celiac disease as autoimmune issue
  • ‘Drowning in data, but thirsting for info’

The importance of the thymus gland

  • T cells manufactured there

Why the ‘mouse model’ doesn’t work well in the study of celiac disease

The impossibility of in vivo experiments for celiac research

The significance of epithelial barriers in a functioning immune system

  • First line of defense against microorganisms
  • Produce local antibodies

The difficulty of studying the dendritic cells

  • Inside tissues

How the immune system recognizes double-stranded RNA (viruses)

  • Can’t escape autoimmune response
  • Should not recognize own single-stranded as ‘invader’

Dr. Terry Wahls’ work around the mitochondria

  • Cured MS with Paleo diet

Dr. Alessio Fasano’s presentation

  • ‘Spectrum of Gluten-Related Disorders’
  • Controversy re: who should go gluten-free
  • Gluten affects every tissue in body (even brain)
  • Celiac cases double every 15 years in US
  • 1:2 in US will try gluten-free diet this year

The big business of celiac disease

  • $17.6B industry at end of 2017
  • Largest untapped market in world

Who is affected by the gluten protein

  • Gluten can’t be digested by human body (long chain amino acid)
  • Triggers autoimmune response, especially in HLA-DQ2/HLA-DQ8 gene carriers
  • Patients without genetic predisposition can present with villous atrophy
  • In absence of celiac diagnosis, may still have non-celiac gluten sensitivity
  • AGA-positive patients at risk for developing neurological issues

How infants exposed to gluten are at an increased risk for developing celiac disease

  • Includes exposure in utero, breast milk
  • No downside to eliminating gluten from baby’s diet

The value of avoiding gluten exposure for infants

  • Emotionally stable
  • Grow, develop appropriately

The latest statistics regarding the prevalence of celiac disease

  • Increased to 3% in US (not 1% consistently reported)
  • 30-50% of world population has genetic predisposition
  • Global prevalence of 1.37%

Celiac disease in the Asian population

  • Used to say could not develop celiac disease
  • At increased risk of developing neurological disorders
  • 6-8M people in east, south Asia
  • 50 countries make up 60% of world population
  • 35B people in China have celiac disease
  • 22B people in India have celiac disease
  • 19% of Chinese 16-25 tested positive for celiac disease in study

How the Chinese diet has evolved over time

  • Older Chinese ate much less wheat
  • Fast food has become common in recent years
  • Despite rice-based diet, many products contain wheat (soy sauce, cashews)

Other disorders that may indicate undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Anemia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Elevated liver enzymes
  • Eating disorders
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis

Why patients should be tested for celiac disease annually

  • Can seroconvert at anytime
  • Develops at any age with any/no symptoms

The new information about a potential connection between Wilson’s and celiac disease

  • 3% of Wilson’s patients tested positive

What celiac experts agreed on at ICDS 2017

  • Poor support, understanding of celiac disease
  • Need to increase knowledge base (general practitioners, food manufacturers, public)
  • Important to find where gluten hides
  • Must take education campaign to non-traditional settings

Resources:

Nima Sensor

Gluten Free RN Travel Podcast EP036

Gluten Free Passport Allergy Cards

Dr. Terry Wahls’ Website

ICDS 2017 Program

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease EP040

According to the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, 10% of MS patients also suffer from celiac disease. Studies conducted in Italy and Spain uncovered a significant increased prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives of MS patients, 18% and 32% respectively. Additional research has identified situations in which celiac disease mimicked other neurological disorders such as MS and ALS.

 With evidence like that, it is definitely worth it to further explore the relationship between MS and celiac disease. Today, the Gluten Free RN investigates whether MS and celiac disease are similar, related, or perhaps the same thing, as she shares case studies from the literature and her own experience.

Nadine discusses the story of Dr. Terry Wahls, explaining how she was able to resolve her symptoms of MS with a variation of a Paleo diet. She outlines the analogous symptoms of MS and celiac cerebellar ataxia, the neurological damage caused by gluten, and how malabsorption of nutrients caused by intestinal damage can extend to medication. Listen and learn how Nadine and others have resolved symptoms of MS and other neurological disorders on a gluten-free diet!

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s MS scare

  • Bouts with falling, dragging feet
  • Numbness, tingling (neuropathy)
  • Symptoms disappeared after adopting gluten-free diet
  • Takes two to three years to resolve neurological symptoms

Dr. Terry Wahls’ story

  • Diagnosed with MS, confined to wheelchair
  • Continued to research condition
  • Adopted version of Paleo diet
  • Now walks without cane, rides bike again
  • Conducts seminars to share how healed mitochondria

The commonalities between celiac disease and MS

  • Both autoimmune issues
  • Studies necessary to determine if conditions are similar, related, or the same

How celiac disease affects the body

  • Triggered by ingestion of gluten
  • Causes villous atrophy, cryptic hyperplasia in small intestines, damage to immune system
  • Primarily neurological disorder

The symptoms of celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Poor balance
  • Hard to distinguish where body is in space
  • Trip, stumble or fall
  • Related to vision

The multi-organ manifestations of celiac disease in the central nervous system

  • White matter lesions
  • Inflammatory cerebral spinal fluid syndrome
  • Sinus venous thrombosis
  • Epilepsy, seizure disorders
  • Cerebellar pontine atrophy
  • Encephalopathy
  • Myelopathy
  • Dementia
  • Gluten ataxia
  • Migraines, headaches
  • Depression, anxiety
  • Cerebellar ataxia

Nadine’s patient who wasn’t responding to MS medication

  • Nadine recommended celiac testing
  • Panel negative, but gene carrier
  • Already adopted gluten-free diet
  • Fewer medications necessary
  • Hope to decrease, discontinue meds
  • Malabsorption issues extend to medications, could stem from undiagnosed celiac disease

The 2014 study in Vienna regarding celiac disease and MS

  • Concluded that celiac disease may mimic MS
  • Celiac disease may be present despite absence of anti-gliadin antibodies
  • If patient history indicates gastrointestinal issues, celiac disease should be considered even if CSF and MRI findings suggest MS

The new evidence around seronegativity in celiac disease

  • Most labs only test for tissue transglutaminase 2
  • Transglutaminase 6 is specific for neurological damage caused by gluten

The 2014 Italian study of the genetic overlap between celiac disease and MS

  • Sites significant increased prevalence of celiac disease in MS first-degree relatives (18%)
  • Recommends celiac testing in MS patients who aren’t responding to MS treatment or present with ataxia

The association between MS and celiac disease as reported by the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

  • Approximately 10% of those who have MS also have celiac disease

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

The 2013 Iranian case study of a celiac patient diagnosed with MS

  • 37-year-old woman with history of chronic abdominal pain
  • Diagnosed with celiac disease, adopted gluten-free diet
  • Became ataxic, met with neurologist
  • MRI indicated multiple sclerosis
  • Nadine argues that patient likely re-exposed to gluten

How gluten acts as a neurotoxin

  • Pastor exposed to gluten in cookies had acute neurological event
  • Shaking, tremors (similar to stroke)

The 2007 Oxford case study of celiac disease mimicking ALS

  • 44-year-old man with progressive right-sided spastic hemiparesis (muscle wasting)
  • Remote family history of celiac disease
  • Strict gluten-free diet resolved most symptoms

Why patients with neurological symptoms should be tested for celiac disease

  • The anti-gliadin antibody is excellent biomarker for gluten sensitivity

Why it is acceptable to adopt a gluten-free diet if your antibody test is negative for celiac disease

The Paleo diet Nadine suggests for celiac and gluten-sensitive patients

  • Gluten-, dairy-free
  • Whole food
  • Low carb, super-good high fat

The increased prevalence of celiac disease in MS patients revealed in a 2011 study

  • Increased prevalence found in eight of 72 MS patients (11.1%)
  • Also in first-degree relatives (13/126 or 32%)
  • Advises increased efforts aimed at early detection and dietary treatment

The fundamentals of MS

  • Chronic disease of unknown etiology
  • T-cell mediated antibody response
  • Leads to demyelination of central nervous system
  • Associated with autoimmunity (body attacking itself)
  • Damage to enteric nervous system can lead to constipation

How to conduct your own research around celiac disease and neurological disorders

  • Celiac researcher Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou

How long it takes to heal on a gluten-free diet

  • Villous atrophy heals in six months to one year
  • Neurological damage takes two to four years

The nutrients a celiac patient is missing that contribute to neurological issues

  • B vitamins
  • Trace amounts of copper
  • Magnesium
  • Zinc

The autoimmune symptoms Nadine resolved/reversed with a gluten-free diet

  • MS symptoms
  • Graves’ disease
  • Positive ANA panel

Why it’s important for celiac patients to work with educated practitioners who understand functional medicine

Resources:

Dr. Terry Wahls’ TED Talk

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principle by Terry Wahls MD

“Celiac Disease with Cerebral and Peripheral Nerve Involvement Mimicking Multiple Sclerosis” in the Journal of Medicine and Life

“Celiac Disease in Multiple Sclerosis: A Controversial Issue” in the International Journal of Neurology and Neurotherapy

University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center MS Info

“Multiple Sclerosis or Neurological Manifestations of Celiac Disease” in Advanced Biomedical Research

“A Case of Celiac Disease Mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis” in Nature Clinical Practice Neurology

“Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Multiple Sclerosis” in BMC Neurology

“A Case of Concurrent Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease” in Govaresh

“Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease” in the Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology

“A Case of Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease” in Case Reports in Neurological Medicine

 Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Safely Traveling on a Gluten-Free or Paleo Diet EP036

Wanderlust.

It is human nature to want to explore, to experience a geography and culture different from our own. Travel can truly enrich our lives. Yet if you have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the prospect of being away from the familiar for an extended period can be intimidating. Will I be able to find a grocery store? How do I locate a gluten-free restaurant that I can trust? What do I need to bring with me to ensure that I am avoiding gluten? And what if, despite my best efforts, I am accidentally exposed to the gluten protein?

No one wants their trip ruined by an unexpected illness, but you shouldn’t let the fear of gluten exposure keep you from going on an important business trip or taking that vacation you’ve always dreamed of. The Gluten Free RN has ten years of experience helping people discover that they can travel safely on a gluten-free or Paleo diet, and today she shares her recent travel experiences with you. Road trip with Nadine and learn how she locates safe restaurants, what she takes along to avoid inadvertent gluten exposure, and which apps and online resources offer the best advice for gluten-free travel!

What’s Discussed: 

The danger of living in a bubble

  • Leads to isolation
  • No way to live

 Nadine’s mission to teach people how to travel safely on gluten-free/Paleo diet

  • Follow her travels on social
  • Posts include pics of locations, food
  • Various travel tips

 How Nadine packed her cooler for a summer road trip to Boston

 The challenge of eating out on the road

  • Lucky to live in Pacific Northwest
  • 37 100% gluten-free restaurants in Portland
  • Accommodating to food intolerance
  • More difficult other places
  • Stressful when unfamiliar with establishment

 The fundamentals of a food desert

  • Little/no access to fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Most available food is highly processed

 Nadine’s advice around locating grocery stores, fresh foods when traveling

 Nadine’s tips for locating safe restaurants

  • Employ the Find Me Gluten Free app
  • Read Yelp reviews, though can be deceptive
  • Avoid restaurants that make pizza
  • Flour stays in air for up to 72 hours
  • Enormous risk of cross-contamination

 The myth that heat breaks down the gluten protein

  • Gluten protein is heat stable
  • Very difficult to denature (even at temperatures of 1200°)
  • Applies to woks, fryers and grills

 How Nadine is able to go without a meal when necessary

  • Nutrient ‘gas tank’ is full
  • High levels of vitamin D, B6, B12 and magnesium
  • Better to skip than be sick for days, weeks or months

 Who to talk to when you are eating out

  • Start with wait staff, chef
  • Speak with manager, if necessary

 Nadine’s experience at a highly-rated restaurant in Boston

  • Selected for positive Yelp reviews
  • Friend used Nima sensor, daughter’s meal contained gluten
  • Notified wait staff, spoke to chef and manager
  • Though establishment caters to gluten-free community, next four meals also tested positive for gluten
  • Learned that pizza was also made in kitchen
  • Stopped by grocery store on way back to hotel
  • Made great, quick and easy dinner in room

 Nadine’s gluten-free travel supply packing list

  • Bamboo utensils
  • Pans
  • Nima sensor or EZ Gluten strips
  • Gluten Free Passport allergy cards
  • Activated charcoal (to take with water after accidental exposure)
  • Sense of humor

 The best gluten-free online travel resources

 Why you should avoid fast food/restaurant chains that claim to have gluten-free offerings

  • Risk of cross-contamination too high
  • May not truly understand what it means to be gluten-free
  • Using gluten-free label as marketing tool

 Nadine’s upcoming River Cruise on the Danube

  • Opportunity for safe travel
  • Responsible, attentive chefs
  • Nadine on hand to confirm food is gluten-free, Paleo

 The food options available to the gluten-free population

  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Fruits and vegetables

Resources:

International Celiac Disease Symposium

Applegate

Kite Hill

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Jilz Crackerz

EPIC bars

Gluten Free Portland Restaurant List

Amy Fothergill of the Warm Kitchen

Ground Breaker Brewing

Whole Foods

Natural Grocers

Find Me Gluten Free

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Gluten-Free Globetrotter

Gluten Free Passport

Melodies of the Danube Brochure

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease EP030

Nobody wants bad bacteria, parasites, yeast or food particles hanging around their small intestine! There are a number of causes of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and undiagnosed celiac disease just happens to be one of them.

The Gluten Free RN is prepared to discuss the complexity of health issues celiac patients must resolve after going on a gluten free diet, one of which may be SIBO. She shares the symptoms of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, how we test for SIBO, and potential treatments for the condition. Listen in to learn how foods and medication affect the microbiome and alter the environment of your intestines.

What’s Discussed:

The complexity of healing once a celiac patient goes gluten free

  • Very rarely does diet change heal all associated disorders
  • Other issues like SIBO must be treated once intestines heal

The causes of irritable bowel syndrome

  • Thought to be caused by stress
  • Studies now show food poisoning may be trigger

How food, drink and medication affect your intestines

  • Certain food/drink can move in bad bacteria, push out good
  • Antibiotics change pH of stomach acid
  • Bacteria, parasites, yeast and food particles get into small intestine

The consequences of damaged villi due to undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Compromised immune system
  • Inflammation
  • Body can’t absorb nutrients

The process of healing your intestines

  • Takes six months to a year
  • Must eliminate all foods that cause inflammation (gluten, dairy, soy, etc.)
  • After villi heal, deal with additional health issues (i.e.: SIBO)
  • Villi MUST grow back before good bacteria can return

The symptoms of SIBO

  • Gas, bloating
  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation

How to test for SIBO

  • Consume sugary drink, then breathe into tube
  • Hydrogen sulfate associated with diarrhea
  • Methane connected to constipation
  • Gives snapshot of what is happening in intestines

How SIBO is treated

  • Antibiotics (rifaximin)
  • Herbs (i.e.: oregano oil, berberine, neem)
  • Fecal microbial transplant

Risk factors for SIBO

  • Any course of antibiotics
  • Diabetes
  • Bowel surgery
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Undiagnosed celiac disease

Resources:

Primal Docs

SIBO Info Website

“Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Comprehensive Review” in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

 

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Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease EP027

Struggling to maintain control of your blood sugar? A gluten-free diet may be the answer! If you have one autoimmune disorder, you have a 30-50% greater risk of developing another, and both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease fall into that category.

As more and more research points to an enormous overlap between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, it is in our best interests to mitigate additional risk by getting screened and/or adopting a gluten-free or Paleo diet to mitigate further risk. Today Nadine discusses the prevalence of diabetes, several research studies that explore the connection between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, and the potential risks for type 1 diabetics who are undiagnosed celiac patients.

Listen and learn how your diet may be affecting your blood sugar and why going gluten-free could improve your health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of diabetes

  • By 2050, half the population will have diabetes
  • According to CDC, 29.1 million have diabetes
  • One out of four don’t know they are diabetic
  • 18,000 young people diagnosed from 2008-2009

The difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes

  • Minimize risk for type 2 through diet and exercise
  • Type 1 is autoimmune disorder, don’t produce enough insulin to break down sugar

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes

  • Extreme thirst
  • Urgency to urinate frequently
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness

The enormous genetic overlap between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

  • Scottish study found 94% of type 1 diabetics were HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 gene carriers
  • 100% overlap if include HLA-DQ2.2
  • Prevalence of celiac disease among type 1 diabetics is 20% higher than general population

The importance of testing all type 1 diabetics for celiac disease annually

  • Can develop celiac disease at any age

The consequences of undiagnosed celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes

  • Short stature
  • Failure to thrive
  • Early onset osteopenia, osteoporosis
  • Easily broken or rubbery bones
  • Difficulty maintaining glycemic control (low blood sugar, spikes)
  • Anemia

The decreased quality of life for type 1 diabetics who are undiagnosed celiac

  • Development of infections
  • Difficulty with blood sugar maintenance

Research studies re: the percentages of type 1 diabetics who also have celiac disease

  • Iraq – 11.2%
  • Mexican participants – 5.9%
  • Denmark – 12.3%

Nadine’s anecdotal evidence of the overlap

  • Volunteers at community outreach clinic
  • Young man struggling to control blood sugar
  • Nadine recommended gluten-free diet
  • Improved health and quality of life

Health risks associated with an inability to control blood sugar

  • Blindness
  • Kidney failure
  • Amputation of extremities
  • Difficulty healing wounds
  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes

Why carb counting doesn’t control blood sugar

  • Carbs with little/no nutrient value cause spikes in blood sugar

The diet Nadine recommends for type 1 diabetics

  • Variation of Paleo diet
  • Nutrient dense foods
  • Meat and fish
  • Eggs
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Nuts and seeds

The benefits of a gluten-free diet for type 1 diabetics

  • Weight easier to control
  • Immune system works better
  • Tighter control on blood sugar

The lack of uniformity in screening guidelines

Additional autoimmune diseases that may be avoided with a gluten-free diet

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Lupus
  • Sjögren’s
  • Scleroderma
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Graves’ disease
  • Hashimoto’s
  • Vitiligo
  • Raynaud’s

Potential triggers for autoimmune disorders

  • Gluten
  • Change in microbiome
  • Stress to body (i.e.: cold, food poisoning, travel)

 Treatments for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

  • Low FODMAPs or specific carb diet
  • Rifaximin (antibiotic)

The dangers of maintaining high blood sugar

  • Damage to kidneys, eyes, capillaries, fingers and toes
  • Neuropathy
  • Gastroparesis

The long history of a connection between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

The need for information re: the connection in diabetic education services

Resources:

“Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease: The Effects of Gluten Free Diet on Metabolic Control” in the World Journal of Diabetes

“Co-occurrence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Celiac Disease” in the World Journal of Diabetes

“Screening for Coeliac Disease in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Myths, Facts and Controversy in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome

“The Prevalence of Coeliac Disease in Libyan Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus” in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews

“Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Celiac Disease: Prevalence and Effect on Clinical and Histological Presentation” in BMC Gastroenterology

“Coexistence of Coeliac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes” in Przeglad Gastroenterologiczny

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Type 1 Diabetes: A Systematic Review” in AAP News and Journals

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and the Media EP026

The gluten-free movement is often dismissed in the media as a fad. Even so-called experts actively discredit the gluten-free diet and apply a negative connotation to terms like PWAG. Have you ever wondered why there is so much misinformation about celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the media? And who sponsors the coverage that dissuades people from going gluten-free?

 Today, Nadine explains how the big business of wheat affects which voices we hear in media treatment of the gluten-free movement. In addition, she covers how the for-profit healthcare system in the US affects the timely diagnosis of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

 Celiac disease is a medical, social and economic issue with political implications. Listen and learn how to choose high quality, nutrient dense foods, and leverage your power as a gluten-free consumer!

What’s Discussed: 

Misinformation in the media

  • Some coverage dissuades from adopting a gluten-free diet
  • Program/print sponsors may be corporations that depend on people eating wheat
  • Wheat/grain industry threatened by rise of gluten-free diet (33% of people in US and Canada on variation of gluten free diet)

The illusion of options in the area of food production

  • 8-10 corporations own nearly every food company
  • Nadine patronizes farmer’s markets, co-ops and local companies

Nadine’s rules for buying food products

  • Label must be clear, easy to read
  • Five or fewer ingredients
  • Must be able to picture each ingredient

The importance of reading labels

  • May be gluten in products that are typically gluten-free (i.e.: pesto, kombucha)
  • Companies are given six months to update labels after making changes
  • Barley and rye are not on list of allergens

Nadine’s story

  • Multi-system organ failure
  • Negative test for celiac disease despite being homozygous gene carrier
  • Healed quickly on a Paleo diet

Why countries with universal healthcare take celiac disease seriously

  • Early diagnosis saves money
  • Finland: 70% of people w/ celiac disease have been diagnosed
  • Italy, UK and Canada: 30-40% have been diagnosed
  • US: Less than 1% of those with celiac disease have been diagnosed

How long it takes to be diagnosed with celiac disease (for-profit vs. universal systems)

  • US: 9-15 years
  • Italy: 2-3 weeks

How doctors/experts discredit gluten-free as a fad

  • Use PWAG as derogatory term
  • Placebo effect
  • Nocebo effect (expect to feel poorly)

The inaccuracy of blood tests for celiac disease

  • 70% false negative

How companies profit from undiagnosed celiac patients

  • Products geared toward people with health issues (i.e.: compression socks, hypoallergenic sheets)

The prominence of wheat as a publicly traded commodity

  • Top export of US/Canada

The health risk associated with genetically modified wheat

The benefits of a gluten-free diet

  • Symptoms resolve
  • No longer need medicine, surgery

Nadine’s advice re: selecting gluten-free products

  • Avoid nutrient deficient gluten-free options (cheap fillers, empty carbs)
  • Focus on high quality, nutrient dense foods

How to leverage your power as a gluten-free consumer

  • Hold food producers accountable (standards, production methods)
  • ‘Vote carefully with your dollar’
  • Speak up when you see inaccurate media coverage

Why you cannot assume that gluten-free menu items are truly free of gluten

  • Uneducated restaurant staff
  • Possibility of contamination, cross-contamination

What a ‘gluten free’ designation means in labeling

  • GIG certification indicates less than ten parts per million
  • Standard in US/Europe is less than 20 parts per million

The Gluten Free RN mission

  • Educate people globally about celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity
  • Empower people to improve their health and quality of life with food

Resources:

Food Company Infographic

Gluten Intolerance Group

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Connection Between Undiagnosed Celiac Disease and Sleep Disorders EP022


We all know how it feels to struggle through the day when you didn’t get enough sleep the night before. Your brain feels fuzzy, it’s tough to focus, and you simply aren’t the best version of yourself! The good news is, there may be a simple explanation for your sleep disorder – and there are steps you can take to eliminate the potential celiac symptoms that are keeping you up at night.

Today the Gluten Free RN shares her struggle with sleep deprivation as an undiagnosed celiac patient who also worked the night shift in the ER. Find out how she leveraged a Paleo diet and went from having a contentious relationship with sleep to becoming a champion ‘Olympic Sleeper’ who enjoys at least eight hours of rest every night!

She also covers the components of an ideal sleep space, suggestions for implementing an evening routine, and the benefits of a good night’s rest. Listen and learn about the connection between sleep disorders and undiagnosed celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s struggle with sleep working the night shift

  • 10 years as ER nurse working 12-hour night shifts
  • Difficult to shift into normal sleep pattern on days off
  • Circadian rhythm thrown off, felt fuzzy-brained
  • Needed extra sleep
  • Struggle to block out distractions

The correlation between undiagnosed celiac disease and sleep disorders

  • Celiac symptoms can keep you awake at night
  • May experience joint pain, muscle pain, DH, eczema, headaches, muscle twitches, restless leg syndrome

How a Paleo lifestyle can alleviate symptoms preventing sleep

How many hours of sleep you should be getting each night

  • Nadine recommends 8-10 hours of good quality sleep
  • Provides the energy for your body to carry out the tasks of daily living

The components of an ideal sleep space

  • Comfortable mattress
  • Quality sheets
  • Plenty of supportive pillows
  • Appropriate temperature
  • Fresh air, if possible
  • No electronic equipment in the room (i.e.: phones, televisions, computers)
  • Source of white noise (e.g.: fan, music)

The model evening routine

  • Limit screen time in the hours before bed
  • Try relaxing activities like reading or knitting instead
  • Take a warm bath with Epsom salt (muscle relaxer, source of magnesium)
  • Consider magnesium supplements

Celiac symptoms that can cause sleep apnea

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

The repercussions of vitamin C deficiency

Signs of sleep disorders in children that may be caused by undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Can’t or don’t want to go to sleep, crying
  • Cranky and fatigued during the day
  • Decreased productivity
  • Learning disabilities
  • Difficulty with focus

Signs of celiac disease in children

  • Short stature
  • Anemia
  • Falling off growth chart
  • Learning disabilities
  • Seizure disorders

Why anyone with sleep disorders should get tested for celiac disease

How Nadine’s sleep issues went away on a gluten-free diet

  • Eliminated back pain, joint pain, skin discomfort, muscle pain, muscle spasms and leg cramps
  • Now she qualifies as an ‘Olympic Sleeper’

The unhealthy approach to compensating for lack of sleep

  • Take in stimulants to make it through the day (e.g.: coffee, sugar)
  • Take depressants at night to help fall asleep (e.g.: alcohol, prescription meds)
  • Everything you consume impacts your health and ability to sleep

A healthy option that functions as a sleep aid

The benefits of a good night’s rest

When to take multivitamins

  • In the morning with food
  • At night before bed (absorbed differently)

The risks associated with prescription medications

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Potential Connection Between Parkinson’s and Celiac Disease EP021


A diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is devastating, and the associated symptoms – difficulty walking, tremors, memory issues – are debilitating. But what if those symptoms aren’t necessarily indicative of Parkinson’s after all? What if a simple diet change could improve or even eliminate those symptoms?

Today Nadine explores anecdotal evidence suggesting that the symptoms of Parkinson’s and other demyelination syndromes might be actually be caused by celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. She argues that as Parkinson’s diagnoses become more and more common, it is imperative that we explore the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease.

Listen in to understand how gluten can affect the neurological system, why Parkinson’s patients should be tested for celiac disease, and how a gluten-free diet can heal neurological damage.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s Parkinson’s patient

  • Diagnosed with celiac disease as a child in the 1940’s
  • Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s
  • Symptoms included difficulty walking, falling, stooped gait, masked appearance, tremors, memory issues and confusion
  • Discovered unintentional gluten exposure in the home
  • Moved to adult foster home to ensure gluten-free diet
  • Many symptoms went away
  • Working with neurologist to wean off Parkinson’s meds

Why patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s, ALS and MS should get test for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

  • Every nerve in the body is insulated with myelin
  • Myelin is made of fat
  • Gluten prevents the absorption of fats
  • Parkinson’s, ALS and MS are all demyelination syndromes

The need for research regarding the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease

  • The University of Chicago asserts there is ‘no published evidence of a connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease’
  • Nadine argues that enough anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that a connection should be investigated

Nadine’s recommendation for a comprehensive celiac lab test

  • Cyrex Labs tests for 25 of the gluten intolerant antibodies, including tTG-2, tTG-3 and tTG-6
  • Ask for a total IgA and IgG in addition to the Cyrex Array 3
  • Insurance should cover the tests
  • Can be ordered by any practitioner

Celiac diagnoses in patients over 60

  • 30% of newly diagnosed celiac patients are over 60
  • Many have neurological issues
  • Neuropathy
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Seizure disorders
  • Difficulty walking
  • Falling
  • Balance issues
  • MS
  • Nadine’s patients improve on a Paleo diet

The Stanford idiopathic familial narcolepsy study

  • Entire family diagnosed with narcolepsy
  • Found that family members had celiac disease
  • Adopting a gluten-free diet eliminated the narcolepsy
  • Family now runs organic farm

The increasing number of Parkinson’s diagnoses

  • More and more common
  • UK neurological expert routinely tests for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

  • Heal intestines
  • Eliminate inflammation
  • Repair immune system
  • Replete nutrient deficiencies

Vitamin D

  • Cancer preventative
  • Level should be between 60-80
  • Indicator of all fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • ‘Sunshine’ vitamin synthesized through skin
  • Must also be taken in dietarily
  • Little chance of overdosing on D3

What your nails can tell you about your health

  • Look for white spots, cracked nails, hangnails
  • May indicate lack of zinc, D3, or B vitamins

Dr. Terry Wahls’ MS misdiagnosis

  • Diagnosed with MS and required wheelchair
  • Healed with a gluten-free diet
  • Can ride her bike and walk without a cane

Nadine’s story

  • At 40, her symptoms suggested MS
  • Issues with clumsiness (falling, dragging feet, dropping things, difficulty with balance)
  • Problems went away on a gluten-free diet
  • Nutrient deficiencies were causing neurological issues

Celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Caused by lesions on or inflammation of the brain
  • Results in inability to walk straight
  • Tissue can be healed on a gluten free diet

 Resources:

Cyrex Laboratories

Midway Farms

La Mancha Ranch and Orchard

Dr. Wahls’ TED Talk

Dr. Wahls’ YouTube Channel

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles – by Terry Wahls, MD and Eve Adamson

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism