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Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Celiac Disease EP069


Your gastrointestinal tract is approximately 30 feet long, and it runs from your mouth all the way to the anus! We know that celiac disease can impact any part of the digestive tract. But there is another disease that wreaks havoc on the GI tract as well, a condition called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE.

The Gluten Free RN is explaining the fundamentals of eosinophilic esophagitis, from its characteristic inflammation of the esophagus and elevated eosinophils in the blood to the common symptoms of vomiting and upper abdominal pain. She walks us through the treatment for EoE, an elimination diet or steroid therapy.

Nadine speaks to the research exploring a possible connection between eosinophilic esophagitis and celiac disease, citing a paper that found a higher prevalence of EoE in children with celiac disease than the general population as well as the case study of a woman with both celiac disease and elevated eosinophils in her blood. Listen in for the Gluten Free RN’s insight on the best EoE clinics and physicians in the country and learn why further study is needed around EoE and celiac disease!

What’s Discussed:

The fundamentals of eosinophilic esophagitis

  • Allergic response to dietary antigens
  • Causes inflammation of esophagus, increased eosinophils in blood

The benefits of unsedated transnasal endoscopy for children with EoE

  • Monitors esophageal mucosa without sedation
  • Safer, faster and less costly

Some common symptoms of eosinophilic esophagitis

  • Vomiting, difficulty swallowing, food stuck in throat
  • Chest pain, heartburn, upper abdominal pain

The condition of achalasia

  • Muscles of esophagus don’t work appropriately
  • Causes spasms or constriction

The treatment for EoE

  • Elimination diet (remove wheat, eggs, milk, soy, shellfish and seafood, peanuts and tree nuts)
  • Topical or systemic steroids

The potential increased prevalence of EoE in children with celiac disease

  • 2015 paper found prevalence of 10.7% (much higher than general population)
  • Other research articles argue no increased prevalence of EoE in CD

The case study of a 30-year-old woman with celiac disease and elevated eosinophils

  • Presented with abdominal pain and distension, vomiting and frequent bowel movement
  • Treated with IV hydrocortisone, but developed steroid induced psychosis

Nadine’s insight on the best specialty clinics for EoE in the US

  • University of Colorado (Denver School of Medicine)
  • Pennsylvania

Dr. Glenn Furuta’s insight on the difficulty of diagnosing EoE

  • Relatively new disease, tendency to diagnose based on pathology report alone
  • Elevated eosinophils also found in GERD, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease

Special considerations for pediatric patients with EoE

  1. Consultation with dietician
  2. Limited exposure to corticosteroids
  3. Attention to development of feeding skills
  4. Potential psychosocial, behavioral problems

Resources:

‘Unsedated Transnasal Esophagoscopy for Monitoring Therapy in Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis’ in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

‘Eosinophilic Esophagitis Associated with Celiac Disease in Children’ in BMC Research Notes

‘Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorder in Coeliac Disease: A Case Report and Review’ in Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine

‘Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adults’ in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

‘The Association Between Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adults’ in BMC Gastroenterology

‘Eosinophils in Gastrointestinal Disorders’ in Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America

‘2013 Update on Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis’ in Nutrients

‘Eosinophilic Esophagitis: New Insights in Pathogenesis and Therapy’  in the World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics

‘Incidence and Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children’ in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

‘Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Celiac Disease’ in Current Opinion in Pharmacology

‘Increased Risk of Esophageal Eosinophilia and Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Patients with Active Celiac Disease on Biopsy’ in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

‘Individuals Affected by Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders Have Complex Unmet Needs and Frequently Experience Unique Barriers to Care’ in Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology

‘Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Celiac Disease: A True Association or Coincidence?’ in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

Connect with Nadine:

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Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Heal

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Poland and Celiac Disease EP063

To pierogi or not to pierogi…

If you have celiac disease, there is no question that you should avoid anything made with flour or grains, no matter how delicious the dish may be. Although the Gluten Free RN has fond memories of her Polish grandmothers making traditional pastries, she contends that you don’t have to eat customary Polish food to celebrate your Polish heritage.

In preparation for her upcoming trip to Warsaw in July, Nadine is taking a closer look at celiac disease in Poland. She discusses a 2009 study assessing the prevalence of celiac disease in Polish children, highlighting the asymptomatic and oligosymptomatic nature of the disease and explaining her own false negative test. Listen in for the Gluten Free RN’s insight around preparing for a trip to Poland, including research on the available gluten-free food and adult beverages!

What’s Discussed:

Why Nadine is concerned about her upcoming trip to Poland

  • Flour, grains used in cooking and baking

Nadine’s Polish heritage

  • Fond memories of grandmothers making pierogi, pastries

The 2009 study of celiac disease in Poland

  • Assessed prevalence in children, only screened for IgA EmA, IgG EmA
  • 3,235 children in Bydgoszcz tested, 25 identified (seven with Marsh III)
  • Predominantly asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic

Nadine’s genetic predisposition for celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2.5 homozygous

How Nadine is preparing for travel in Poland

  • Aware of Polish translations for gluten-free, celiac (bezglutenowe, trzewny)
  • Take ‘rescue food’ for emergencies

The prevalence of celiac disease in Poland

  • 1:100 (matches worldwide estimate)

The gluten-free alcoholic beverages available in Poland

  • Potato vodka, honey mead

Nadine’s caution against eating bread in Europe

  • Wheat, grain causes damage regardless of location

The overlap between autoimmune and celiac disease

  • CD is grossly unrecognized, underdiagnosed

Nadine’s suggested diet for celiac patients

  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Fruits and vegetables

Resources:

NIH Consensus Development Conference on Celiac Disease

‘Screening for Celiac Disease in Poland’ in the Medical Science Monitor

Gluten-Free Globetrotter Blog on Poland

Gluten-Free Travel in Poland—Coeliac Youth of Europe

Poland Travel Guide—Coeliac UK

‘Graves’ Disease, Celiac Disease and Liver Function Abnormalities in a Patient—Clinical Manifestation and Diagnostic Difficulties’ in ACTA Biochimica Polonica

‘Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Celiac Disease’ in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment

‘Evaluation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 Genotype in Patients with Celiac Disease Hospitalised in 2012 at the Department of Paediatrics’ in Przeglad Gastroenterologiczny

For Visitors with Coeliac Disease—Polskie Stowarzyszenie Osob z Celiakia i na Diecie Bezglutenowej

Connect with Nadine:

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Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Irish and Celiac Disease EP062

The Irish are known for being lucky… But does that luck hold out when it comes to celiac disease?

The prevalence of celiac disease among the Iris is 1:100, about the same as the rest of the world. And if you are a redhead of Irish descent, there is a good chance that you are an HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 gene carrier.

Today, the Gluten Free RN explores Irish ancestry and celiac disease, discussing how the Potato Famine led to a change in diet for much of the surviving population. She walks us through a paper published by Irish College of General Practitioners explaining the clinical presentations and complications of celiac disease.

Nadine shares her experience running the Dublin marathon and the health consequences she suffered after touring the Guinness brewery. Listen in to understand the work of the Coeliac Society of Ireland and learn about the trends in celiac disease among the Irish.

What’s Discussed: 

Why red hair is associated with celiac disease

  • Tend to be HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 gene carriers

The prevalence of celiac disease in Irish Setters

  • Do much better on a gluten-free/Paleo diet

The Irish Potato Famine

  • Potato-based diet, little access to grains
  • Famine from 1845-1849
  • One million died, many emigrated

The myth that celiac disease is more prevalent in Europe than the US

  • 30-50% of the population carries HLA-DQ2, HLA-DQ8 gene

The myth that women are more susceptible to celiac disease

  • Statistics don’t support this belief

The Irish College of General Practitioners paper on celiac disease

  • Clinical presentations, complications of celiac disease
  • Conditions associated with increased prevalence

The prevalence of celiac disease in Ireland

  • 1:100 (matches rest of world)

The appropriate testing for celiac disease and NCGS

  • Blood test for total IgA/IgG, DGP and AGA

Nadine’s experience running the Dublin marathon in 1998

  • Extreme edema in lower extremities

The information provided by the Coeliac Society of Ireland

  • Health ramifications of undiagnosed CD
  • Average duration from symptoms to diagnosis (nine months)

Resources:

‘Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy in a Family of Irish Setters’ in The Canadian Veterinary Journal

‘Diagnosis and Management of Adult Coeliac Disease’ in ICGP

Coeliac Society of Ireland

‘Prevalence and Incidence of Celiac Disease in Edinburgh and the Lothian Region of Scotland’ in Gastroenterology

‘Prevalence and Diagnosis’ by the Coeliac Society of Ireland

‘Coeliac Disease in Europe’ in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

‘Escalation in the Amount of Adults Diagnosed with Coeliac Disease’ in Lifestyle Health

‘Gluten-Free Foods’ by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland

‘How Irish Diets of the Past Affect the Present’ in The Irish Times

‘Changes in Presentation of Celiac Disease in Ireland from the 1960s to 2015’ in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

‘Coeliac Disease: A Personal Perspective’ in Irish Health

‘Coeliac Disease: More Common Than You Think in Irish Health

‘Pathology and Management of Coeliac Disease’ by the Dublin Academic Medical Centre & UCD

Connect with Nadine:

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Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Hepatitis B Vaccine and Celiac Disease EP060

We get vaccinated to protect ourselves, to gain an immunity to a particular disease. But in the case of hepatitis B, celiac patients may come to find out that we are NOT immune—despite having done the right thing in getting a hepatitis B vaccination.

Today, the Gluten Free RN is walking us through the latest research around vaccination and celiac disease. She explores the fact that celiac patients are more likely to be non-responsive to HBV than the general population, explaining the fundamentals of hepatitis B and the two main theories as to why the vaccine doesn’t work for some celiac patients.

Nadine shares her take on immunizations, explaining why she is a proponent of an alternate vaccination schedule for infants who may be immunocompromised. Listen in and learn how to determine whether you are truly immune to hepatitis B and protect yourself from potentially life-threatening disease!

What’s Discussed: 

The basics of hepatitis B (HBV)

  • Viral infection that attacks liver
  • Transmitted through blood, body fluids

The prevalence of hepatitis B

  • 257M people infected
  • 887K deaths in 2015

The 2013 Italian study around celiac disease and the hepatitis B vaccine

  • Number of non-responders to vaccine higher in CD patients
  • May be genetic OR caused by gluten intake during vaccination

Nadine’s experience with vaccination as a child

  • Contracted mumps despite MMR

Nadine’s take on vaccination

  • Advocates for immunization to prevent disease
  • Giving babies multiple vaccines at once may not be best

The conclusion of a 2017 Italian study

  • Administer booster shots of hepatitis B vaccine as needed
  • Evaluate response to vaccine in newly diagnosed celiac patients
  • Revaccinate one year after adoption of gluten-free diet

The value of a hepatitis B titer

  • Confirms whether really immune
  • If not, test for celiac disease

Resources:

‘Hepatitis B Vaccine in Celiac Disease: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow in the World Journal of Gastroenterology

‘Vaccinations in Celiac Disease’ in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

‘Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Celiac Disease’ in the World Journal of Gastroenterology

‘Immune Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Systematic Review and Met-Analysis’ in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

‘Early Vaccinations are Not Risk Factors for Celiac Disease’ in Pediatrics

‘Gluten Intake Interferes with the Humoral Immune Response to Recombinant Hepatitis B Vaccine in Patients with Celiac Disease’ in Pediatrics

‘Effect of Pentavac and Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) Vaccination on the Intestine’ in Gut

‘Normal of Defective Immune Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine in Patients with Diabetes and Celiac Disease’ in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

Connect with Nadine:

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Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Hypothyroid, Pulmonary Edema and Celiac Disease EP059


When the Gluten Free RN went on a gluten-free diet 11 years ago, her thyroid settled down and the associated symptoms and disorders—Graves’ disease, weight gain and hair loss—resolved.

But when Nadine was inadvertently hit with gluten two years ago, several of those symptoms returned, along with a few new ones. She was losing hair and gaining water weight again. On top of that, her sinuses were congested. She developed asthma, a rash on her lower right leg and a scary case of pulmonary edema (excess fluid in the lungs).

Hindsight being 20/20, Nadine realizes that her recent diagnosis of hypothyroidism is associated with that accidental gluten ingestion. Further study made it clear that there is a potential connection between her thyroid problems and pulmonary edema, as the leaky gut that comes with celiac disease can cause fluid shifts into body tissues.

Today the Gluten Free RN explores the links among celiac disease, thyroid disorders and pulmonary edema. She explains the function of the endocrine system, the symptoms associated with hypothyroidism, and the diet she recommends for patients with thyroid issues. Listen in for Nadine’s insight around how gluten affects the thyroid gland and why the resulting low sodium levels might trigger edema in celiac patients.

What’s Discussed: 

The function of the endocrine system

  • Glands in body that make hormones

The connection between celiac disease and thyroid disorders

  • Thyroid especially vulnerable to gluten protein in wheat, barley, rye and oats

Nadine’s symptoms of hypothyroidism

  • Lower extremity edema
  • Congested sinuses
  • Hair falling out
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Asthma
  • Rash on leg

How damp rash lotion resolved Nadine’s symptoms

  • Prescribed by acupuncturist in Chiang Mai
  • Rash cleared, could breathe easy
  • Symptoms returned within four weeks of return to US

Nadine’s thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels

  • Within normal limits despite thyroid issues
  • Practitioner declined to order thyroid panel

The relationship between thyroid issues and edema

  • Sodium = major electrolyte, maintains body’s pH
  • Hypothyroidism means low sodium levels
  • Leaky gut of celiac disease leads to fluid shifts (edema)

The research around thyroid disorders and celiac disease in Current Allergy and Asthma Reports

  • Association between CD and thyroid disorders well documented
  • Increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves’ disease in celiac populations

The diet Nadine recommends for celiac patients with potential thyroid issues

  • Gluten-free, dairy-free
  • Whole food, Paleo

Why patients with unexplained pulmonary edema should be tested for celiac disease AND thyroid disorders

  • Potential connection among all three

The symptoms associated with hypothyroidism

  • Puffy face, constipation, fatigue
  • Muscle weakness, aches and pains
  • Irregular, delayed menstrual periods
  • Hair loss, thinning hair
  • Slower heartrate, hypothermia
  • Depression, memory problems

Resources:

‘Pregnancy Complicated with Pulmonary Edema Due to Hyperthyroidism’ in the Journal of the Chinese Medical Association

‘Sleep Apnea, Hypothyroidism and Pulmonary Edema’ in CHEST Journal Letters to the Editor

‘Thyroid and Fluid Retention’ on the Wilson’s Syndrome Site

‘Acute Pulmonary Edema as a First Manifestation of Hyperthyroidism in a Pregnant Woman’ in Revista Medica de Chile

‘Hypothyroidism and Non-Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema: Are We Missing Something Here?’ in Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports

‘Celiac Disease and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease’ in Clinical Medicine & Research

‘Celiac Disease and Autoimmunity: Review and Controversies’ in Current Allergy and Asthma Reports

‘An Unusual Cause of Flash Pulmonary Oedema’ in BMJ Case Reports

‘Challenges in the Management of a Patient with Myxoedema Coma in Ghana: A Case Report’ in Ghana Medical Journal

‘Hyponatremia and the Thyroid: Causality or Association?’ in the Journal of Clinical Medicine

‘Interactions Between Thyroid Disorders and Kidney Disease’ in the Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Connect with Nadine:

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Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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My Health and Lessons for You EP057


Two and a half years ago, Nadine was inadvertently hit with gluten—three times in a row. In the past, it had taken about ten weeks for her symptoms to resolve after an accidental exposure, but this time they stuck around. It started with feeling cold. Then she began experiencing abdominal distention and pain.  Her dermatitis herpetiformis returned, she was plagued with sinus congestion, and she was gaining weight. Most concerning of all, she developed pulmonary edema, a condition caused by excess fluid in the lungs.

Today, the Gluten Free RN is getting real, revealing the health struggles she has been dealing with since 2015. She explains the circumstances that led to her accidental gluten exposure and recounts the ten scary nights she spent in a recliner, forced to sit up in order to breathe.

Nadine takes us along on her global search for the answers that began with a practitioner in Thailand and a tiny container of damp rash lotion, and ended with a diagnosis of myxedema from a naturopath here in the States. Nadine discusses how those three consecutive hits of gluten targeted her thyroid gland and how T3 is working to resolve her symptoms. Listen in and learn how the Gluten Free RN is reclaiming her Superwoman status and how you, too, can reach your full potential with good health and wellbeing!  

What’s Discussed: 

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs

  • Physiological, safety needs must be taken care of first
  • Difficult to achieve self-actualization with poor health

Nadine’s health struggle the past 30 months

  • Inadvertently hit with gluten three times in a row
  • Symptoms persisted past usual ten weeks
  • Sinus congestion, DH, pulmonary edema and weight gain

Nadine’s search for the underlying cause

  • Saw practitioner in Chiang Mai, damp rash lotion resolved symptoms
  • Naturopath in Oregon diagnosed myxedema (hypothyroidism)

How Nadine is reclaiming her health

  • Taking T3 to resolve symptoms

How a damaged thyroid gland impacted Nadine

  • Affected sleep, ability to do challenging physical activity

The importance of support in getting your health back

  • Need relationships to support choices

Resources:

Whole30

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease for Nurses EP056

Celiac disease is messy. It can develop at any age, in any ethnicity, in both men and women, with any symptom or no symptom at all. Every patient is different, and each one presents differently. There is nothing cut and dried about celiac disease, except that a 100% gluten-free diet is necessary for healing.

Nurses are in a unique position to make sense of this chaos and advocate for patients, recognizing possible celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity and recommending appropriate testing when necessary. Today, the Gluten Free RN covers the basics of celiac disease for nurses, explaining the frequency with which the disorder is misdiagnosed or goes undiagnosed for years.  She walks us through the testing required for a diagnosis of celiac disease proper, who should undergo testing, and why one negative test doesn’t rule out the disease.

Nadine speaks to the 300-plus signs of celiac disease, reviewing the most common symptoms and the overlap between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders like type 1 diabetes. She also shares the discouraging statistics around the impact of undiagnosed celiac disease on fetal development and maternal health. Listen in to understand why Nadine encourages fellow nurses include celiac disease as part of their differential diagnosis, providing gluten-sensitive patients with a safe, gluten-free environment and a higher quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

The frequency with which celiac disease is misdiagnosed or goes undiagnosed

  • 94% of people with celiac disease are undiagnosed
  • Current estimate is 3% of US population
  • Takes average of 9-15 years for diagnosis

 The challenges around getting a diagnosis of celiac disease proper

  • Requires genetic test, celiac antibody test and documented villous atrophy
  • Celiac antibody test = 70% false negative in US

 The chronic nature of celiac disease

  • Patients must go 100% gluten-free for life

 The 300-plus signs and symptoms of celiac disease

  • Primarily a neurological disorder

 Why celiac patients must be tested for potential nutritional deficiencies

  • May need B12, Mg RBC, D3, Zn or I supplements

 The detrimental impact of undiagnosed celiac disease on fetal development, maternal health

  • 800-900% increase in miscarriage
  • Increased risk of stillbirth, premature birth and neural defects

 Where gluten is hiding

  • Medications, personal care products and food items

 Who should be tested for celiac disease

  • Patients with mental health issues, developmental delays
  • Anyone with an autoimmune disorder (e.g.: type 1 diabetes)
  • Family members of celiac patients

 Why one negative test doesn’t rule out celiac disease

  • Can seroconvert at any time

 How a gluten-free diet can benefit children with stunted growth

  • Growth resumes if diagnosed before epiphyseal plates seal

Resources:

Celiac Disease and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity for Nurses

Recommended Labs

Recognizing Celiac Disease: Signs, Symptoms, Associated Disorders & Complications by Cleo J. Libonati

Gluten Free Works

PubMed

Cyrex Labs

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Thoughts on Celiac Disease EP054

In 11 years as the Gluten Free RN, Nadine has done an incredible amount of research on celiac disease and delivered more than 2,000 lectures. No question she is frustrated to see misinformation continue to make its way onto celiac support sites and Facebook groups. How does the average person sift through all the material that’s out there—material that may be influenced by corporations and pharmaceutical companies with a vested interest in the way celiac disease is perceived—to get to the most accurate information?

Just in time for the holidays, the Gluten Free RN is sharing her wish list around the direction of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the next ten years. She discusses the need for a global mass screening, explaining how celiac disease meets the World Health Organization’s criteria. She covers the reasons why pharmaceutical companies have no place in celiac research as well as the bad publicity the gluten-free community receives in the media.

Nadine speaks to the grievous lack of education about celiac disease among healthcare providers and shares her hope for a cultural shift to support people on a gluten-free diet, explaining the role nurses can play in ending the needless suffering. She talks about why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous and how to make the best food choices based on your lifestyle and current situation. Listen in and get empowered to accept responsibility for your health!

What’s Discussed: 

The need for a global mass screening

  • Celiac disease meets WHO criteria
  • 30-50% of population carries gene

Why pharmaceutical companies should not be involved in celiac research

  • Diet change resolves symptoms
  • Pharmaceutical involvement gives false hope for cure

The misinformation about celiac disease in the media

  • Misrepresentation in recent episode of Freakonomics Radio

The need to educate healthcare providers around celiac disease

Nadine’s call for support of people on a gluten-free diet

  • Don’t assume intentionally being difficult

The unique position of nurses to use their influence

  • Prevent needless suffering with understanding of celiac disease

Why you must accept responsibility for your own health

  • Take advantage of available resources
  • Find practitioners open to other modalities

How to avoid processed foods

  • Focus on raw, whole foods
  • Choose fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Don’t fall victim to convenience marketing
  • Use community, intuition to make decisions

Why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous

  • Nadine restored her health by eliminating grains
  • Unethical to suggest that celiac patient go off gluten-free diet

Resources:

Freakonomics Radio: The Demonization of Gluten

2004 NIH Consensus Statement on Celiac Disease

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Managing the Holidays with Celiac Disease EP050

With the approach of the holidays, you may be nervous about navigating family and workplace gatherings—especially if you are newly diagnosed with celiac disease. How do you explain your dietary restrictions and keep yourself safe, eating well without getting ‘glutened’?

Today the Gluten Free RN shares her best advice around managing the holidays with celiac disease. She offers ten key tenants to help you enjoy the holiday season and mitigate stress, without feeling like you’re missing out. She shares some things you need to avoid, including unsafe situations, people who make you miserable, and cheating on your gluten-free diet! But she also discusses strategies you can implement to make the season bright, such as creating new traditions, getting creative in the kitchen, and finding your tribe—the people who will support you in your gluten-free journey.

Nadine also gives tips around where to go for gluten-free ingredients and holiday recipes, and how to develop a backup plan so you won’t go hungry if the food you encounter is questionable. You are likely to encounter well-intentioned friends and family members who have no idea how to feed you safely at holiday parties. Listen in and learn how to be clear about your dietary needs and take control of your health without isolating yourself from loved ones during this most wonderful time of the year!

What’s Discussed: 

#1 Don’t eat anything contaminated with wheat

  • Cannot eat center of pie, any part of turkey with bread stuffing

#2 Beware of good-intentioned people

  • Don’t eat anything questionable
  • Bring a snack with you just in case

#3 Be prepared to establish new traditions

  • Get creative in kitchen

#4 Don’t isolate yourself

  • Find support group, create your own

#5 Gather recipes early

#6 Order ingredients in advance

  • Consider organic, free range turkey

#7 Don’t invite people who make you miserable

  • Set clear boundaries (no complaints, ridicule)

#8 Eat before you go or take your own plate

  • ‘Desperate people make desperate decisions’
  • Take a dish to share, take your portion first

#9 Don’t be a victim

  • Be clear about your needs

#10 Find your people

  • Those who truly love you don’t want you to be sick

Resources:

 

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Paleo Magazine

Paleo Principles: The Science Behind the Paleo Template, Step-by-Step Guides, Meal Plans, and 200+ Healthy & Delicious Recipes for Real Life by Sarah Ballantyne

Sarah Ballantyne on Instagram

Glutenpro

EnteroLab

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism