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Why No Dairy on a Gluten-Free Diet? EP068


If you’re just getting used to eliminating gluten from your diet, it may feel like a burden to remove dairy as well—especially if you’re a fan of comfort foods like cheese and ice cream. Why exactly do many practitioners recommend a gluten- AND dairy-free diet to patients diagnosed with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity?

The Gluten Free RN is walking us through the similarities between gliadin and casein, explaining how the proteins found in gluten, milk and cheese impact our brains. She discusses how Marsh 1 damage from celiac disease leads to an inability to break down the sugar in milk and why we crave the very foods that are making us sick.

Nadine shares the story of a young man with autism whose health improved once his family went gluten-free, describing the well-documented gut-brain connection and how the right high-fat diet can repair the neurological system. Listen in for the Gluten Free RN’s insight around dairy replacement options and get empowered to reclaim your health with a gluten- and diary-free diet!

What’s Discussed: 

The similarities between the gluten and casein proteins

  • Molecularly very similar, bodies read as toxins
  • Both capable of crossing blood-brain barrier

How the casein protein impacts the brain

  • Causes inflammation, hypoxia (decrease flow of oxygen)
  • Brain fog, anxiety, depression, irritability and fatigue

The effect of Marsh 1 damage due to celiac disease

  • Microvilli damaged or destroyed
  • Can’t produce enzymes that break down sugar in milk

How gluten and casein proteins act as exorphins

  • Bind with opium receptors in brain
  • Crave foods that make us sick

Nadine’s recommendations for dairy replacements

How a gluten-free diet helped a young man with autism

  • More interaction with family, fewer GI issues
  • High-fat diet repairs neurological system

The story of Dr. Terry Wahls

  • Diagnosed with MS, healed on gluten-free diet

Resources:

Aroy’d Coconut Milk

Kite Hill

NuCulture Foods

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Jilz Crackers

Dr. Terry Wahls’ TED Talk

The Wahls Protocol  by Dr. Terry Wahls

Dr. Terry Wahls’ Website

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Heal

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Poland and Celiac Disease EP063

To pierogi or not to pierogi…

If you have celiac disease, there is no question that you should avoid anything made with flour or grains, no matter how delicious the dish may be. Although the Gluten Free RN has fond memories of her Polish grandmothers making traditional pastries, she contends that you don’t have to eat customary Polish food to celebrate your Polish heritage.

In preparation for her upcoming trip to Warsaw in July, Nadine is taking a closer look at celiac disease in Poland. She discusses a 2009 study assessing the prevalence of celiac disease in Polish children, highlighting the asymptomatic and oligosymptomatic nature of the disease and explaining her own false negative test. Listen in for the Gluten Free RN’s insight around preparing for a trip to Poland, including research on the available gluten-free food and adult beverages!

What’s Discussed:

Why Nadine is concerned about her upcoming trip to Poland

  • Flour, grains used in cooking and baking

Nadine’s Polish heritage

  • Fond memories of grandmothers making pierogi, pastries

The 2009 study of celiac disease in Poland

  • Assessed prevalence in children, only screened for IgA EmA, IgG EmA
  • 3,235 children in Bydgoszcz tested, 25 identified (seven with Marsh III)
  • Predominantly asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic

Nadine’s genetic predisposition for celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2.5 homozygous

How Nadine is preparing for travel in Poland

  • Aware of Polish translations for gluten-free, celiac (bezglutenowe, trzewny)
  • Take ‘rescue food’ for emergencies

The prevalence of celiac disease in Poland

  • 1:100 (matches worldwide estimate)

The gluten-free alcoholic beverages available in Poland

  • Potato vodka, honey mead

Nadine’s caution against eating bread in Europe

  • Wheat, grain causes damage regardless of location

The overlap between autoimmune and celiac disease

  • CD is grossly unrecognized, underdiagnosed

Nadine’s suggested diet for celiac patients

  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Fruits and vegetables

Resources:

NIH Consensus Development Conference on Celiac Disease

‘Screening for Celiac Disease in Poland’ in the Medical Science Monitor

Gluten-Free Globetrotter Blog on Poland

Gluten-Free Travel in Poland—Coeliac Youth of Europe

Poland Travel Guide—Coeliac UK

‘Graves’ Disease, Celiac Disease and Liver Function Abnormalities in a Patient—Clinical Manifestation and Diagnostic Difficulties’ in ACTA Biochimica Polonica

‘Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Celiac Disease’ in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment

‘Evaluation of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 Genotype in Patients with Celiac Disease Hospitalised in 2012 at the Department of Paediatrics’ in Przeglad Gastroenterologiczny

For Visitors with Coeliac Disease—Polskie Stowarzyszenie Osob z Celiakia i na Diecie Bezglutenowej

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The US Military and Celiac Disease EP061

It goes without saying that anyone who serves in the military needs to be healthy and strong—and that military leaders have an obligation to keep enlisted servicemen and women as safe and healthy as possible. So, it makes sense that people with food allergies (including celiac patients) are disqualified from military service, but it is less clear why celiac testing is not a part of the medical exam to qualify for enlistment.

Today, the Gluten Free RN addresses the issue of celiac disease in the military. She explains the challenges of preparing gluten-free food in a mess hall setting and describes the consequences for an active duty soldier who is found to have celiac disease.

Nadine shares a research study exploring celiac trends among active duty military as well as a case study around veterans and celiac disease. Listen in for insight on what’s behind the increased prevalence of celiac disease among military personnel and the confirmed association between celiac disease and other complex health issues.

What’s Discussed: 

Why celiac patients are disqualified from enlisting in any branch of service

  • Unable to provide safe food

What happens to military personnel who are found to have celiac disease

  • Will receive medical discharge

The US military policy around food allergies and intolerances

  • No accommodations made

Countries that allow celiac patients to serve

  • Israel, Finland and Scandinavia

The Mayo Clinic study of celiac trends among active duty military

  • Healthy worker population with medical diagnostic coding
  • Incidence of celiac disease increased five-fold from 1999-2008
  • Combination of increased suspicion and environmental factors

The challenge of preparing gluten-free food in a military setting

  • High risk of cross-contamination

A case study involving military veterans and celiac disease

  • Confirmed association between CD and other complex issues

The benefits of a gluten-free diet

  • Preventative for autoimmune disorders, nutritional deficiencies and cancer

Nadine’s argument for celiac testing prior to enlistment

  • Obligation to safety of servicemen/women

Resources:

Military Standards of Medical Fitness

‘The Incidence and Risk of Celiac Disease in a Healthy US Adult Population’ in the American Journal of Gastroenterology

‘Celiac Sprue Among US Military Veterans: Associated Disorders and Clinical Manifestations’  in Digestive Diseases and Sciences

‘Gluten-Free Soldier in Afghanistan’ in Gluten-Free Living

‘Medical Mix-Up Sidelines Army Sergeant’s Career’ in Military Times

Celiac Disease-Related Veterans Affairs Case

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Thoughts on Celiac Disease EP054

In 11 years as the Gluten Free RN, Nadine has done an incredible amount of research on celiac disease and delivered more than 2,000 lectures. No question she is frustrated to see misinformation continue to make its way onto celiac support sites and Facebook groups. How does the average person sift through all the material that’s out there—material that may be influenced by corporations and pharmaceutical companies with a vested interest in the way celiac disease is perceived—to get to the most accurate information?

Just in time for the holidays, the Gluten Free RN is sharing her wish list around the direction of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the next ten years. She discusses the need for a global mass screening, explaining how celiac disease meets the World Health Organization’s criteria. She covers the reasons why pharmaceutical companies have no place in celiac research as well as the bad publicity the gluten-free community receives in the media.

Nadine speaks to the grievous lack of education about celiac disease among healthcare providers and shares her hope for a cultural shift to support people on a gluten-free diet, explaining the role nurses can play in ending the needless suffering. She talks about why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous and how to make the best food choices based on your lifestyle and current situation. Listen in and get empowered to accept responsibility for your health!

What’s Discussed: 

The need for a global mass screening

  • Celiac disease meets WHO criteria
  • 30-50% of population carries gene

Why pharmaceutical companies should not be involved in celiac research

  • Diet change resolves symptoms
  • Pharmaceutical involvement gives false hope for cure

The misinformation about celiac disease in the media

  • Misrepresentation in recent episode of Freakonomics Radio

The need to educate healthcare providers around celiac disease

Nadine’s call for support of people on a gluten-free diet

  • Don’t assume intentionally being difficult

The unique position of nurses to use their influence

  • Prevent needless suffering with understanding of celiac disease

Why you must accept responsibility for your own health

  • Take advantage of available resources
  • Find practitioners open to other modalities

How to avoid processed foods

  • Focus on raw, whole foods
  • Choose fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Don’t fall victim to convenience marketing
  • Use community, intuition to make decisions

Why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous

  • Nadine restored her health by eliminating grains
  • Unethical to suggest that celiac patient go off gluten-free diet

Resources:

Freakonomics Radio: The Demonization of Gluten

2004 NIH Consensus Statement on Celiac Disease

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Go Gluten Free for Good EP052

How do you successfully transition to and maintain a 100% gluten-free diet for the rest of your life? The prospect of eliminating wheat, barley and rye from your diet may seem daunting, but it is possible to go gluten free for good—for the good of your family and your health!

The Gluten Free RN explains the addictive nature of gluten and what to expect during the detox process as you begin your gluten-free journey. She offers valuable advice around how to choose the best quality food products while avoiding potential sources of cross-contamination.

Nadine discusses the need for supplements that will help you heal faster and more completely, speaking to the vitamin levels you should monitor along the way. Listen and learn her best tips for navigating the grocery store and maintaining a positive attitude throughout the process of going gluten-free—for GOOD!

What’s Discussed: 

The addictive nature of gluten

  • Gliadin, gluten proteins bind to opioid receptors
  • Wheat, barley and rye are cheap and readily available

 What to expect during the detox process

  • Different for everyone
  • Consider elimination diet to reboot system
  • May feel worse before feel better
  • Headaches, low energy and feeling hungry are common

 Why you shouldn’t cheat on a gluten-free diet

  • Same autoimmune response, even if symptom-free

 Potential sources of cross-contamination

  • Processed foods
  • Unwashed fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Bulk bins
  • Restaurants
  • Own home (i.e.: cutting boards, hands, pets, utensils, appliances, etc.)

 Nadine’s rules around choosing quality food products

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Picture every ingredient
  • Certified gluten-free
  • 100% grain-free

 Why there is no such thing as cheap food

  • Pay for quick-fixes to treat symptoms

 The necessity of additional vitamins, supplements

  • Helps heal faster, more completely
  • Use multivitamin, fish oil, pre- and probiotics
  • Check levels of D3, Zinc, B6 and B12
  • Liquid, chewables and capsules are easier to break down

 Nadine’s advice around navigating the grocery store

  • Plan menus in advance
  • Bring list of safe foods
  • Read labels carefully
  • Consider local co-ops, natural grocers and farmers markets

 Nadine’s best tips for going gluten-free

  • Concentrate on what you can eat
  • Accept more cooking, baking and meal planning
  • Find support group
  • Stay current on research, food labeling
  • Practice mindfulness, maintain positive attitude

Resources:

Whole30

Country Life Vitamins

Robb Wolf’s Paleo Food Matrix

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Nutrient Dense Foods EP051

‘When in doubt, go without.’

The problem with processed food is that you simply can’t be sure that it is gluten-free. The risk of cross-contamination is high, and no one at the big corporations is accountable for your health. Not to mention the fact that processed foods have been irradiated to make them shelf-stable, effectively killing any probiotics. Even certified gluten-free products are often low in nutrients, high in calories—and expensive!

So what should you eat? The Gluten Free RN is on the case with her best suggestions around finding organic, whole foods that contain the healthy fat you need to heal. She explains her revised, gluten-free version of the food pyramid and discusses how these nutrient-dense foods support the healing process.

Nadine provides a list of the best nutrient-dense foods, offering the benefits of each. She also speaks to the most appropriate vitamins and supplements available to solve your nutrient deficiencies. You are what you eat, so make sure you are filling your tank with nutrient-dense foods that will improve your health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

How nutrient dense foods support healing

  • Regenerate villi
  • Reduce inflammation of intestines
  • Heal immune system

Why Nadine recommends staying away from gluten-free junk foods

  • Low in nutrients, high in calories
  • Risk of cross-contamination (processed in facilities with wheat products)

The best sources of nutrient-dense foods

  • Whole foods, organic
  • Farmers market (few/no fertilizers)

Why shelf-stable products lack nutrients

  • Food dead from irradiation, no live probiotics

The risk of contamination in processed foods

  • No one accountable at big corporation
  • ‘When in doubt, go without’

Nadine’s revised food pyramid

  • Fruits and vegetables at base
  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts, seeds and berries

The importance of eating healthy fats

  • Heals intestines
  • Absorb fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • Fix deficiencies
  • Healthy brain cells, nervous system
  • Balance hormones

Nadine’s recommendations around the best nutrient-dense foods

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Leafy greens (e.g.: kale, collard greens)
  • Berries
  • Coconuts
  • Black molasses
  • Avocados
  • Pumpkin, chia seeds
  • Meat and fish
  • High-quality eggs
  • Licorice root, peppermint tea
  • Cinnamon

Nadine’s vegetable challenge

  • Expand your vegetable repertoire
  • Try one new veggie per week

Nadine’s suggestions around additional vitamins, supplements

  • Good quality multivitamin
  • Fish oil (i.e.: Nordic Naturals)
  • Pre/probiotics
  • Vitamin D

How to avoid cross-contamination

  • Avoid bulk food bins
  • Wash produce

Resources:

Midway Farms on Facebook

Nordic Naturals

Country Life Vitamins

Bluebonnet Nutrition

Pure Encapsulations

National Nurses in Business Association

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Lyme Infection and Celiac Disease EP049

If you’ve been following a strict gluten-free diet, but continue to suffer from lingering neurological symptoms, you may need to explore the possibility that you have Lyme disease. In fact, there are many parallels between celiac disease and Lyme, and the Gluten Free RN has called in an expert to discuss the similarities between the two disorders and why a gluten-free diet is part of the proper treatment for both.

Dr. Usha Honeyman, a chiropractic and naturopathic physician out of Corvallis, Oregon, joins Nadine to explain the fundamentals of Lyme disease. She shares her best advice around prevention and treatment, exploring why it can be difficult to get an accurate diagnosis.

Nadine and Usha also cover the inflammation of the gut that plagues both celiac and Lyme patients, the neurological component of Lyme disease, and the relationship between Lyme and illnesses like MS, Parkinson’s and ALS. Listen in to understand what can happen when Lyme goes untreated and how antibiotics coupled with a gluten-free diet may restore your health!

What’s Discussed: 

The fundamentals of Lyme disease

  • Most common insect-borne disease in US
  • Primarily carried by tics (disable immune system at bite site)
  • CDC estimates 300K new cases each year

How to prevent Lyme infection

How the political controversy in medicine has led to conflicting information around Lyme disease

The treatment for Lyme disease

  • Long-term antibiotics
  • T3 to raise body temperature, make white blood cells more efficient
  • Probiotics to support immune system

Why Dr. Honeyman advises Lyme patients to go gluten-free

  • Lyme causes inflammation of gut

The neurological component of Lyme disease

  • Spirochetes permeate blood-brain barrier
  • Cause brain fog, balance issues, sensory disorders, etc.

The alpha-gal reaction in Lyme patients in the Southeast US

The strange gait and lower-face movement in Lyme patients

  • Bell’s palsy is red flag for Lyme disease

The importance of having a Lyme-literate doctor

  • Skin scraping of rash for diagnosis available in research setting
  • ELISA and Western blot miss 80-90% of Lyme patients

The consequences of untreated Lyme disease

The three forms of Borrelia

  • Spirochete-form, intracellular and cystic

 Resources:

Dr. Honeyman’s Website

CDC Website

Picaridin

Natrapel

Insect Shield Clothing

Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar—Your Brain’s Silent Killers by David Perlmutter

Under Our Skin Film

International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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FAQ’s About Celiac Disease Answered EP047

How do I get over feeling sad about giving up the foods I love? Don’t celiac patients look a certain way? Can I eat wheat when I travel to Europe?

Today the Gluten Free RN is answering your frequently asked questions about celiac disease, clearing up misconceptions around the safety of wheat in Europe, the appearance of a celiac patient, and the percentage of the population that suffers from gluten sensitivity. She speaks to the challenges of getting your healthcare provider to do appropriate testing for celiac disease and the learning curve associated with changing your diet.

Nadine also explains the risks of embarking on a gluten challenge and the benefits of a super-good high fat diet. She discusses why a single breadcrumb can trigger an autoimmune response and how she uses tools like a Nima Sensor when she eats out. Listen in and learn why one negative test doesn’t rule you out for celiac disease, especially if you suffer from type 1 diabetes.

Having celiac disease doesn’t mean you have to live in a bubble. The Gluten Free RN wants to give you the answers you need to navigate the world—happy, healthy and gluten-free!

What’s Discussed: 

‘My sister has celiac disease, but I tested negative. I do have type 1 diabetes… What should I do?’

  • Get genetic test for HLA-DQ2, HLA-DQ8
  • Virtually every type 1 diabetic is gene carrier
  • One test doesn’t rule you out

 ‘Why do you use a Nima Sensor or EZ Gluten test strips? Doesn’t it give you a false sense of security?’

  • Have to trust others to prepare food when out
  • Not foolproof, but does give decent idea

 ‘A single breadcrumb or dusting of flour can trigger an autoimmune response? Really?’

 ‘I am overweight, I have dark hair, and I’m not of European descent. Don’t celiac patients look a certain way?’

  • Can’t see genes, celiac disease can affect any population worldwide
  • Overweight patients tend to be malnourished (unable to absorb nutrients)
  • Never rule out based on appearance, may not show physical symptoms

‘Why do you recommend a super-good high-fat diet?’

‘I’m already on a gluten-free diet. Do I need to go back to gluten to prove I have celiac disease?’

‘My cousin was just diagnosed with celiac disease, and she is very sad about giving up the food she grew up with. How can she get started on a gluten-free diet?’

  • Steep learning curve goes with process
  • Okay to feel sad, angry
  • Remember you will get better without surgery, medication
  • Try to see as an adventure

 ‘Why won’t my doctor order tests for celiac disease?’

  • Countries with for-profit healthcare tend to do poor job of testing, follow-up care
  • Fragmented, inaccurate education around celiac disease
  • Be own best advocate

 ‘Can I eat wheat in Europe?’

 ‘Is it true that celiac disease affects 1% of the population?’

  • 1% translates to 3M people
  • 3% is more accurate statistic
  • Won’t know for sure until conduct mass screening

Resources:

Gluten Free RN EP027: Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

 

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The Psychology of Eating Gluten Free EP045

We all just want to fit in, so it can be embarrassing to have special needs when it comes to your diet. Whether you are gluten-free, Paleo, or suffering from food allergies, a feeling of isolation is not uncommon. After all, you have to eat differently from the rest of your friends, family, or colleagues—and that makes you stand out. You run the risk of being perceived as picky or annoying, when the truth is that certain foods are toxic to your system!

Today the Gluten Free RN speaks to the psychology of eating gluten-free, explaining the sense of disbelief many gluten-sensitive individuals feel when the food they love turns out to be poison. She discusses ‘food ideology’ and why changing your diet can be so challenging.

Nadine also covers the doubt, mocking, and even anger that celiac and gluten-sensitive individuals face, offering suggestions for building connections with a like-minded, gluten-free community. Listen in as she outlines her approach to dating on a Paleo diet and reassuring family and friends who find a gluten-free diet too restrictive for kids. Learn to be your own best advocate and resist the social pressure to eat the standard American diet!    

What’s Discussed:

Why gluten sensitive patients must be willing to experiment

  • Learn how body works best
  • Identify foods that allow body to heal
  • Pinpoint foods that cause symptoms

A downtown Corvallis business owner’s testimonial

  • Couldn’t get doctor to test for celiac disease
  • Family gave hard time
  • Gluten-free for year
  • Bloating, abdominal pain went away
  • Head clear

How to research the possibility that gluten is causing your symptoms

  • Search PubMed
  • Use both spellings (celiac, coeliac)

Why people are resistant to diet change

  • Subscribe to particular food ideology
  • Media, social pressure to eat standard American diet

The difficulty around getting a celiac diagnosis

The value of preventative medicine

Dating on a gluten-free diet

  • Look for someone open to new ideas
  • Nadine’s partner is supportive, willing to change
  • On food path together
  • Health benefits whether celiac or not

The human need to be part of a community

  • Celiac patients may feel isolated from family, at work/school
  • Find ‘your people’ (gluten-free support group, cross-fit gym)

The global shift to a Western diet

  • Export fast food to world
  • Increased consumption of wheat, barley, rye and oats

Why Nadine recommends a Whole30 diet

  • Remove all grains, dairy, alcohol and sugar
  • Eat meat and fish, nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables
  • Allows body to reboot
  • Evaluate how you feel

The narcotic-like effect of gluten on the brain

  • Comfort foods (pasta, pizza) contain wheat, dairy
  • Cause chemical reaction in brain

Nadine’s recent experience in hospitals

  • Only nutrient-deficient, packaged foods available
  • Offerings toxic, full of sugar

Nadine’s rules around ingredients in packaged foods

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture every ingredient

Why people on a gluten-free diet are reluctant to tell others

  • Don’t want to be difficult, needy
  • Don’t want to call attention, be seen as ‘other’
  • May be questioned or face anger, mocking
  • Demoralizing to go to restaurant, grocery store (can’t eat 90%)

How to approach neighbors or family who view a gluten-free diet as too restrictive for kids

  • Ensure that kids are healthy, thriving
  • Let them know ‘not missing out’

The psychology of denial

  • Some celiac patients believe okay to cheat
  • Bread crumb, dusting of flour can cause autoimmune response

Nadine’s opposition to a gluten challenge

  • Can cause organ damage
  • Some never recover

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Resources:

 

Books by Dr. Rodney Ford

PubMed

The Whole30 Program

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine