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Review of Colombia University Celiac Disease Conference 2018 EP064

When faced with new information, it’s important to consider the source. Stop for a moment and examine whether the material is coming from someone with YOUR best interests at heart. The Gluten Free RN has just returned from the Colombia University Celiac Disease Conference, and she is breaking down the information presented to determine what’s useful—and what might be tainted by the pharmaceutical or food industry agenda.

Nadine begins with a workshop led by General Mills that offered some questionable information about how grains are processed at their factories and a talk led by University of Chicago faculty on the topic of a gluten challenge. She also speaks to the differences between celiac management in the US and countries with universal healthcare like Italy and Australia.

Nadine covers new testing that detects gluten exposure in stool or urine and what that reveals about the systemic nature of gluten damage as well as her take on practitioners who perpetuate the myth that grains are necessary and nutritious. Listen in for the Gluten Free RN’s insight around pharmaceutical treatments for celiac disease and the danger in volunteering for studies backed by drug companies.

What’s Discussed:

The two programs available at Colombia’s 2018 conference

  • Clinical (nurses, RDs and laypeople)
  • International (doctors, scientists, industry and VC)

How celiac disease is managed in Italy

  • Presentation by Dr. Carolina Ciacci
  • Law mandates gluten-free options

Nadine’s frustration with the General Mills presentation

  • Major sponsor of conference
  • Claim to separate grains at factory

Nadine’s take on gluten-free Cheerios

  • Should be avoided, not truly gluten-free

Nadine’s confusion around Dr. Bana Jabri’s comments

  • Wouldn’t put ‘potential celiac patient’ on gluten-containing diet
  • Did not include patients with positive antibody test but negative biopsy

Why the biopsy for celiac disease is problematic

  • Only tests one foot into duodenum
  • GI tract is 30 feet in length

Nadine’s insight on a gluten-free challenge

  • No possible benefit for patient
  • Unnecessary, unethical

The systemic nature of gluten damage

  • New tests detect gluten exposure in stool, urine
  • Urine test indicates passage through every system

Nadine’s stance on pharmaceutical treatments for celiac disease

  • No pill or vaccine will treat or cure CD
  • Harmful to people in studies

The myth that grains are necessary and nutritious

  • Practitioners who perpetuate are ‘toeing company line’

Why it’s important to understand the source of your information

  • Should be untainted by pharmaceutical money, agenda

Australia’s requirements for gluten-free food

  • Standard of less than 3 ppm

Resources:

Celiac Symposium Program

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Heal

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Celiac Disease Worldwide EP016


Wherever there is wheat, there is susceptibility to celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Gluten is a growing global problem, exacerbated by the popularity of the western diet around the world. This issue has personal, social and political implications as it places a significant economic burden on individuals, communities, and even entire nations.

 The Gluten Free RN brings us a ‘big picture’ perspective of the celiac and gluten sensitive population around the world, as we learn about how other countries support these individuals. She also covers the industries that have begun to recognize the power of the gluten free population as a consumer group.

 Nadine will be doing some globe-trotting herself come September for the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, and she is currently soliciting advice regarding where and how to eat safely during her travels in India and Thailand. Feel free to message her with recommendations!  

What’s Discussed: 

When and where wheat originated

  • Fertile Crescent (Northern Africa and the Middle East)
  • 10,000 years ago
  • High prevalence of celiac disease in these regions now

 The International Celiac Disease Symposium

  • September 2017 in New Delhi
  • Held every two years
  • Scientists, medical professionals and other interested parties
  • Share latest research

 Where celiac disease is common

  • Anywhere people are eating grains
  • More widespread as other regions adopt a western diet
  • Increased risk in Punjab population of India

 The basics of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Can present in many ways (300+ signs and symptoms)
  • #1 autoimmune disease in the world
  • More likely to recover the sooner identified
  • 30-50% of the population carry the genes (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8) that indicate predisposition
  • Body doesn’t have enzymes to break down gluten proteins
  • Gluten damages intestines
  • Nadine recommends adopting a Paleo diet in order to heal

 The World Health Organization’s “burden of disease”

  • Measures the impact of celiac disease
  • Based on financial cost, mortality, morbidity, etc.

 How Italy supports celiac patients

  • Provide extra days off work for doctor’s appointments, shopping
  • Ship gluten free food

 Potential symptoms of celiac disease affecting every ethnicity

  • Odd gait (gluten ataxia)
  • Skin rash (dermatitis herpetiformis)

 The power of celiac and gluten-sensitive patients as a group

  • Largest untapped market in the world
  • Some industries taking notice (pharmaceutical, food)
  • Use influence to heal selves and educate others

 Why some people are so resistant to eliminating grains

  • Sometimes crave what is bad for you
  • Nutritional deficiencies may cause addiction

 Resources Mentioned:

 Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies –  by Jared M. Diamond

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism