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Hepatitis B Vaccine and Celiac Disease EP060

We get vaccinated to protect ourselves, to gain an immunity to a particular disease. But in the case of hepatitis B, celiac patients may come to find out that we are NOT immune—despite having done the right thing in getting a hepatitis B vaccination.

Today, the Gluten Free RN is walking us through the latest research around vaccination and celiac disease. She explores the fact that celiac patients are more likely to be non-responsive to HBV than the general population, explaining the fundamentals of hepatitis B and the two main theories as to why the vaccine doesn’t work for some celiac patients.

Nadine shares her take on immunizations, explaining why she is a proponent of an alternate vaccination schedule for infants who may be immunocompromised. Listen in and learn how to determine whether you are truly immune to hepatitis B and protect yourself from potentially life-threatening disease!

What’s Discussed: 

The basics of hepatitis B (HBV)

  • Viral infection that attacks liver
  • Transmitted through blood, body fluids

The prevalence of hepatitis B

  • 257M people infected
  • 887K deaths in 2015

The 2013 Italian study around celiac disease and the hepatitis B vaccine

  • Number of non-responders to vaccine higher in CD patients
  • May be genetic OR caused by gluten intake during vaccination

Nadine’s experience with vaccination as a child

  • Contracted mumps despite MMR

Nadine’s take on vaccination

  • Advocates for immunization to prevent disease
  • Giving babies multiple vaccines at once may not be best

The conclusion of a 2017 Italian study

  • Administer booster shots of hepatitis B vaccine as needed
  • Evaluate response to vaccine in newly diagnosed celiac patients
  • Revaccinate one year after adoption of gluten-free diet

The value of a hepatitis B titer

  • Confirms whether really immune
  • If not, test for celiac disease

Resources:

‘Hepatitis B Vaccine in Celiac Disease: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow in the World Journal of Gastroenterology

‘Vaccinations in Celiac Disease’ in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

‘Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Celiac Disease’ in the World Journal of Gastroenterology

‘Immune Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Systematic Review and Met-Analysis’ in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

‘Early Vaccinations are Not Risk Factors for Celiac Disease’ in Pediatrics

‘Gluten Intake Interferes with the Humoral Immune Response to Recombinant Hepatitis B Vaccine in Patients with Celiac Disease’ in Pediatrics

‘Effect of Pentavac and Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) Vaccination on the Intestine’ in Gut

‘Normal of Defective Immune Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine in Patients with Diabetes and Celiac Disease’ in Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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My Health and Lessons for You EP057


Two and a half years ago, Nadine was inadvertently hit with gluten—three times in a row. In the past, it had taken about ten weeks for her symptoms to resolve after an accidental exposure, but this time they stuck around. It started with feeling cold. Then she began experiencing abdominal distention and pain.  Her dermatitis herpetiformis returned, she was plagued with sinus congestion, and she was gaining weight. Most concerning of all, she developed pulmonary edema, a condition caused by excess fluid in the lungs.

Today, the Gluten Free RN is getting real, revealing the health struggles she has been dealing with since 2015. She explains the circumstances that led to her accidental gluten exposure and recounts the ten scary nights she spent in a recliner, forced to sit up in order to breathe.

Nadine takes us along on her global search for the answers that began with a practitioner in Thailand and a tiny container of damp rash lotion, and ended with a diagnosis of myxedema from a naturopath here in the States. Nadine discusses how those three consecutive hits of gluten targeted her thyroid gland and how T3 is working to resolve her symptoms. Listen in and learn how the Gluten Free RN is reclaiming her Superwoman status and how you, too, can reach your full potential with good health and wellbeing!  

What’s Discussed: 

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs

  • Physiological, safety needs must be taken care of first
  • Difficult to achieve self-actualization with poor health

Nadine’s health struggle the past 30 months

  • Inadvertently hit with gluten three times in a row
  • Symptoms persisted past usual ten weeks
  • Sinus congestion, DH, pulmonary edema and weight gain

Nadine’s search for the underlying cause

  • Saw practitioner in Chiang Mai, damp rash lotion resolved symptoms
  • Naturopath in Oregon diagnosed myxedema (hypothyroidism)

How Nadine is reclaiming her health

  • Taking T3 to resolve symptoms

How a damaged thyroid gland impacted Nadine

  • Affected sleep, ability to do challenging physical activity

The importance of support in getting your health back

  • Need relationships to support choices

Resources:

Whole30

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease for Nurses EP056

Celiac disease is messy. It can develop at any age, in any ethnicity, in both men and women, with any symptom or no symptom at all. Every patient is different, and each one presents differently. There is nothing cut and dried about celiac disease, except that a 100% gluten-free diet is necessary for healing.

Nurses are in a unique position to make sense of this chaos and advocate for patients, recognizing possible celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity and recommending appropriate testing when necessary. Today, the Gluten Free RN covers the basics of celiac disease for nurses, explaining the frequency with which the disorder is misdiagnosed or goes undiagnosed for years.  She walks us through the testing required for a diagnosis of celiac disease proper, who should undergo testing, and why one negative test doesn’t rule out the disease.

Nadine speaks to the 300-plus signs of celiac disease, reviewing the most common symptoms and the overlap between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders like type 1 diabetes. She also shares the discouraging statistics around the impact of undiagnosed celiac disease on fetal development and maternal health. Listen in to understand why Nadine encourages fellow nurses include celiac disease as part of their differential diagnosis, providing gluten-sensitive patients with a safe, gluten-free environment and a higher quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

The frequency with which celiac disease is misdiagnosed or goes undiagnosed

  • 94% of people with celiac disease are undiagnosed
  • Current estimate is 3% of US population
  • Takes average of 9-15 years for diagnosis

 The challenges around getting a diagnosis of celiac disease proper

  • Requires genetic test, celiac antibody test and documented villous atrophy
  • Celiac antibody test = 70% false negative in US

 The chronic nature of celiac disease

  • Patients must go 100% gluten-free for life

 The 300-plus signs and symptoms of celiac disease

  • Primarily a neurological disorder

 Why celiac patients must be tested for potential nutritional deficiencies

  • May need B12, Mg RBC, D3, Zn or I supplements

 The detrimental impact of undiagnosed celiac disease on fetal development, maternal health

  • 800-900% increase in miscarriage
  • Increased risk of stillbirth, premature birth and neural defects

 Where gluten is hiding

  • Medications, personal care products and food items

 Who should be tested for celiac disease

  • Patients with mental health issues, developmental delays
  • Anyone with an autoimmune disorder (e.g.: type 1 diabetes)
  • Family members of celiac patients

 Why one negative test doesn’t rule out celiac disease

  • Can seroconvert at any time

 How a gluten-free diet can benefit children with stunted growth

  • Growth resumes if diagnosed before epiphyseal plates seal

Resources:

Celiac Disease and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity for Nurses

Recommended Labs

Recognizing Celiac Disease: Signs, Symptoms, Associated Disorders & Complications by Cleo J. Libonati

Gluten Free Works

PubMed

Cyrex Labs

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Thoughts on Celiac Disease EP054

In 11 years as the Gluten Free RN, Nadine has done an incredible amount of research on celiac disease and delivered more than 2,000 lectures. No question she is frustrated to see misinformation continue to make its way onto celiac support sites and Facebook groups. How does the average person sift through all the material that’s out there—material that may be influenced by corporations and pharmaceutical companies with a vested interest in the way celiac disease is perceived—to get to the most accurate information?

Just in time for the holidays, the Gluten Free RN is sharing her wish list around the direction of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the next ten years. She discusses the need for a global mass screening, explaining how celiac disease meets the World Health Organization’s criteria. She covers the reasons why pharmaceutical companies have no place in celiac research as well as the bad publicity the gluten-free community receives in the media.

Nadine speaks to the grievous lack of education about celiac disease among healthcare providers and shares her hope for a cultural shift to support people on a gluten-free diet, explaining the role nurses can play in ending the needless suffering. She talks about why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous and how to make the best food choices based on your lifestyle and current situation. Listen in and get empowered to accept responsibility for your health!

What’s Discussed: 

The need for a global mass screening

  • Celiac disease meets WHO criteria
  • 30-50% of population carries gene

Why pharmaceutical companies should not be involved in celiac research

  • Diet change resolves symptoms
  • Pharmaceutical involvement gives false hope for cure

The misinformation about celiac disease in the media

  • Misrepresentation in recent episode of Freakonomics Radio

The need to educate healthcare providers around celiac disease

Nadine’s call for support of people on a gluten-free diet

  • Don’t assume intentionally being difficult

The unique position of nurses to use their influence

  • Prevent needless suffering with understanding of celiac disease

Why you must accept responsibility for your own health

  • Take advantage of available resources
  • Find practitioners open to other modalities

How to avoid processed foods

  • Focus on raw, whole foods
  • Choose fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Don’t fall victim to convenience marketing
  • Use community, intuition to make decisions

Why a gluten-free diet is NOT dangerous

  • Nadine restored her health by eliminating grains
  • Unethical to suggest that celiac patient go off gluten-free diet

Resources:

Freakonomics Radio: The Demonization of Gluten

2004 NIH Consensus Statement on Celiac Disease

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Eating Disorders and Celiac Disease EP043

Imagine being admitted to a psychiatric hospital and accused of being a pathological liar because no matter how carefully you follow the high-carb diet prescribed by your physicians, you continue to lose weight. In the introduction to his book, How Doctors Think, Dr. Jerome Groopman shares the story of a woman who was misdiagnosed with anorexia nervosa. The patient was ready to give up when one last doctor discovered villous atrophy and determined that it was celiac disease—not an eating disorder—that was causing her malnourishment.

Today the Gluten Free RN explores the reasons why celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are often mistaken for anorexia nervosa. She shares the limited research in the field, as well as the symptoms related to malnourishment that may be caused by gluten, including several mental health disorders.

Listen in as Nadine covers the use of PWAG (people who avoid gluten) as a derogatory term and shares her frustration with labels like ‘orthorexia nervosa’ which imply that gluten-sensitive patients are obsessed with healthy food: ‘I avoid gluten like the plague because it is, in fact, the plague for those of us who have celiac disease.’   

 What’s Discussed: 

The use of PWAG as a derogatory term

  • ‘People who avoid gluten’
  • Half of people in US
  • Implies food crazed/obsessed

 The new term orthorexia nervosa

  • Refers to obsessive behavior in pursuit of healthy diet
  • Not clinical term/official diagnosis

 The concept of food as medicine

 Anecdotal evidence of celiac disease misdiagnosed as anorexia

  • Introduction of Dr. Jerome Groopman’s book, How Doctors Think
  • Woman admitted to psychiatric hospital (thought to be pathological liar)
  • Continued to lose weight despite prescribed high-carb diet
  • Biopsy revealed Marsh 4 damage
  • Gluten-free diet resolved symptoms

 Why celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are misdiagnosed as eating disorders

  • Inability to absorb nutrients results in severe weight loss, malnutrition
  • Become picky eaters because food causes suffering
  • Practice food avoidance

 The prevalence of celiac disease

  • 3% of the US population
  • Millions undiagnosed

 How gluten affects a celiac patient

  • Gluten protein as neurotoxin
  • Damages intestines
  • Impairs immune system
  • Causes inflammation
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Joint, muscle pain
  • Any -itis

 Nadine’s recommended variation of a Paleo diet

  • Local, organic, whole foods
  • 100% grass-fed beef (no antibiotics/hormones)
  • Nutrient dense

 The study of celiac disease and eating disorders

  • Very few research studies in last 11 years
  • Handful of case studies in literature

 The issues associated with malnourishment

  • Little body fat
  • Cachectic
  • Hormonal disruption
  • Thyroid issues

 The anger and contempt Nadine has experienced as the Gluten Free RN

  • Gluten, dairy associated with comfort food
  • People resistant to give up

 The mental health issues associated with malnourishment

  • Significant cognitive impairment
  • Hypoxia
  • Brain atrophy (shrinking)

 The effect of gluten on epithelial tissue

  • Leaky skin, lungs, blood vessels, blood-brain barrier
  • Causes increased/decreased blood pressure, POTS

 The consequences of gluten getting through the blood-brain barrier

  • Causes hypoxia
  • Brain needs oxygen to work appropriately
  • Brain fog (irritability, anger)
  • Early onset dementia

 The shocking statistics around psychotropic medication in the US

  • Up to 50% of population on anti-depressants, mood-altering drugs
  • Gluten-free diet could help ‘get brain back’

 Nadine’s advice for parents of children who miss multiple days of school

  • Could be undiagnosed celiac disease
  • No downside to clinical trial of gluten-, dairy-free diet
  • Consider Whole30 Diet (eliminate sugar, grains, legumes)

 The process of a gluten detox

  • Gluten has narcotic-like effect on brain
  • May feel worse before you feel better
  • One day to two months

 The benefits of maintaining a gluten-free diet

  • Anxiety goes away
  • Mood improves
  • Able to sleep
  • Pain resolves
  • Heal intestines, epithelial tissue
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Heal immune system
  • Brain receives necessary oxygen

 The foods Nadine recommends as part of a super-good, high-fat diet

  • Avocados
  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Coconut milk
  • Hemp milk

 Why Nadine chooses not to eat if there is any risk of gluten contamination in her food

 The places where gluten hides

  • Single bread crumb
  • Dusting of flour
  • Oil French fries cooked in
  • Personal care products

Resources:

 

How Doctors Think by Jerome Groopman, MD

Dr. Groopman’s NPR Interview

“The Interaction Between Eating Disorders and Celiac Disease: An Exploration of 10 Cases” in the European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology

“Orthorexia and Anorexia Nervosa: Two Distinct Phenomena? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Orthorexic Behaviours in BMC Psychiatry

“Predictors of Orthorexic Behaviours in Patients with Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Study” in BMC Psychiatry

“Eating Disorders and Celiac Disease: A Case Report” in The International Journal of Eating Disorders

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Potential Connection Between Parkinson’s and Celiac Disease EP021


A diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is devastating, and the associated symptoms – difficulty walking, tremors, memory issues – are debilitating. But what if those symptoms aren’t necessarily indicative of Parkinson’s after all? What if a simple diet change could improve or even eliminate those symptoms?

Today Nadine explores anecdotal evidence suggesting that the symptoms of Parkinson’s and other demyelination syndromes might be actually be caused by celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. She argues that as Parkinson’s diagnoses become more and more common, it is imperative that we explore the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease.

Listen in to understand how gluten can affect the neurological system, why Parkinson’s patients should be tested for celiac disease, and how a gluten-free diet can heal neurological damage.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s Parkinson’s patient

  • Diagnosed with celiac disease as a child in the 1940’s
  • Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s
  • Symptoms included difficulty walking, falling, stooped gait, masked appearance, tremors, memory issues and confusion
  • Discovered unintentional gluten exposure in the home
  • Moved to adult foster home to ensure gluten-free diet
  • Many symptoms went away
  • Working with neurologist to wean off Parkinson’s meds

Why patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s, ALS and MS should get test for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

  • Every nerve in the body is insulated with myelin
  • Myelin is made of fat
  • Gluten prevents the absorption of fats
  • Parkinson’s, ALS and MS are all demyelination syndromes

The need for research regarding the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease

  • The University of Chicago asserts there is ‘no published evidence of a connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease’
  • Nadine argues that enough anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that a connection should be investigated

Nadine’s recommendation for a comprehensive celiac lab test

  • Cyrex Labs tests for 25 of the gluten intolerant antibodies, including tTG-2, tTG-3 and tTG-6
  • Ask for a total IgA and IgG in addition to the Cyrex Array 3
  • Insurance should cover the tests
  • Can be ordered by any practitioner

Celiac diagnoses in patients over 60

  • 30% of newly diagnosed celiac patients are over 60
  • Many have neurological issues
  • Neuropathy
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Seizure disorders
  • Difficulty walking
  • Falling
  • Balance issues
  • MS
  • Nadine’s patients improve on a Paleo diet

The Stanford idiopathic familial narcolepsy study

  • Entire family diagnosed with narcolepsy
  • Found that family members had celiac disease
  • Adopting a gluten-free diet eliminated the narcolepsy
  • Family now runs organic farm

The increasing number of Parkinson’s diagnoses

  • More and more common
  • UK neurological expert routinely tests for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

  • Heal intestines
  • Eliminate inflammation
  • Repair immune system
  • Replete nutrient deficiencies

Vitamin D

  • Cancer preventative
  • Level should be between 60-80
  • Indicator of all fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • ‘Sunshine’ vitamin synthesized through skin
  • Must also be taken in dietarily
  • Little chance of overdosing on D3

What your nails can tell you about your health

  • Look for white spots, cracked nails, hangnails
  • May indicate lack of zinc, D3, or B vitamins

Dr. Terry Wahls’ MS misdiagnosis

  • Diagnosed with MS and required wheelchair
  • Healed with a gluten-free diet
  • Can ride her bike and walk without a cane

Nadine’s story

  • At 40, her symptoms suggested MS
  • Issues with clumsiness (falling, dragging feet, dropping things, difficulty with balance)
  • Problems went away on a gluten-free diet
  • Nutrient deficiencies were causing neurological issues

Celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Caused by lesions on or inflammation of the brain
  • Results in inability to walk straight
  • Tissue can be healed on a gluten free diet

 Resources:

Cyrex Laboratories

Midway Farms

La Mancha Ranch and Orchard

Dr. Wahls’ TED Talk

Dr. Wahls’ YouTube Channel

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles – by Terry Wahls, MD and Eve Adamson

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism