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Nutrient Dense Foods EP051

‘When in doubt, go without.’

The problem with processed food is that you simply can’t be sure that it is gluten-free. The risk of cross-contamination is high, and no one at the big corporations is accountable for your health. Not to mention the fact that processed foods have been irradiated to make them shelf-stable, effectively killing any probiotics. Even certified gluten-free products are often low in nutrients, high in calories—and expensive!

So what should you eat? The Gluten Free RN is on the case with her best suggestions around finding organic, whole foods that contain the healthy fat you need to heal. She explains her revised, gluten-free version of the food pyramid and discusses how these nutrient-dense foods support the healing process.

Nadine provides a list of the best nutrient-dense foods, offering the benefits of each. She also speaks to the most appropriate vitamins and supplements available to solve your nutrient deficiencies. You are what you eat, so make sure you are filling your tank with nutrient-dense foods that will improve your health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

How nutrient dense foods support healing

  • Regenerate villi
  • Reduce inflammation of intestines
  • Heal immune system

Why Nadine recommends staying away from gluten-free junk foods

  • Low in nutrients, high in calories
  • Risk of cross-contamination (processed in facilities with wheat products)

The best sources of nutrient-dense foods

  • Whole foods, organic
  • Farmers market (few/no fertilizers)

Why shelf-stable products lack nutrients

  • Food dead from irradiation, no live probiotics

The risk of contamination in processed foods

  • No one accountable at big corporation
  • ‘When in doubt, go without’

Nadine’s revised food pyramid

  • Fruits and vegetables at base
  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts, seeds and berries

The importance of eating healthy fats

  • Heals intestines
  • Absorb fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • Fix deficiencies
  • Healthy brain cells, nervous system
  • Balance hormones

Nadine’s recommendations around the best nutrient-dense foods

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Leafy greens (e.g.: kale, collard greens)
  • Berries
  • Coconuts
  • Black molasses
  • Avocados
  • Pumpkin, chia seeds
  • Meat and fish
  • High-quality eggs
  • Licorice root, peppermint tea
  • Cinnamon

Nadine’s vegetable challenge

  • Expand your vegetable repertoire
  • Try one new veggie per week

Nadine’s suggestions around additional vitamins, supplements

  • Good quality multivitamin
  • Fish oil (i.e.: Nordic Naturals)
  • Pre/probiotics
  • Vitamin D

How to avoid cross-contamination

  • Avoid bulk food bins
  • Wash produce

Resources:

Midway Farms on Facebook

Nordic Naturals

Country Life Vitamins

Bluebonnet Nutrition

Pure Encapsulations

National Nurses in Business Association

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Managing the Holidays with Celiac Disease EP050

With the approach of the holidays, you may be nervous about navigating family and workplace gatherings—especially if you are newly diagnosed with celiac disease. How do you explain your dietary restrictions and keep yourself safe, eating well without getting ‘glutened’?

Today the Gluten Free RN shares her best advice around managing the holidays with celiac disease. She offers ten key tenants to help you enjoy the holiday season and mitigate stress, without feeling like you’re missing out. She shares some things you need to avoid, including unsafe situations, people who make you miserable, and cheating on your gluten-free diet! But she also discusses strategies you can implement to make the season bright, such as creating new traditions, getting creative in the kitchen, and finding your tribe—the people who will support you in your gluten-free journey.

Nadine also gives tips around where to go for gluten-free ingredients and holiday recipes, and how to develop a backup plan so you won’t go hungry if the food you encounter is questionable. You are likely to encounter well-intentioned friends and family members who have no idea how to feed you safely at holiday parties. Listen in and learn how to be clear about your dietary needs and take control of your health without isolating yourself from loved ones during this most wonderful time of the year!

What’s Discussed: 

#1 Don’t eat anything contaminated with wheat

  • Cannot eat center of pie, any part of turkey with bread stuffing

#2 Beware of good-intentioned people

  • Don’t eat anything questionable
  • Bring a snack with you just in case

#3 Be prepared to establish new traditions

  • Get creative in kitchen

#4 Don’t isolate yourself

  • Find support group, create your own

#5 Gather recipes early

#6 Order ingredients in advance

  • Consider organic, free range turkey

#7 Don’t invite people who make you miserable

  • Set clear boundaries (no complaints, ridicule)

#8 Eat before you go or take your own plate

  • ‘Desperate people make desperate decisions’
  • Take a dish to share, take your portion first

#9 Don’t be a victim

  • Be clear about your needs

#10 Find your people

  • Those who truly love you don’t want you to be sick

Resources:

 

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Paleo Magazine

Paleo Principles: The Science Behind the Paleo Template, Step-by-Step Guides, Meal Plans, and 200+ Healthy & Delicious Recipes for Real Life by Sarah Ballantyne

Sarah Ballantyne on Instagram

Glutenpro

EnteroLab

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Gluten Free Products EP048

The increasing number of gluten-free products on the market can be both a blessing and a curse. Yes, it gives us more options, but are those options truly safe and healthy?

Today the Gluten Free RN goes over the important questions to ask about the products you consume, explaining how the foods promoted by some gluten-free groups may be influenced by their corporate sponsors. She reminds us why we can’t simply trust the products labeled ‘gluten-free’ or ‘gluten removed,’ discussing the lack of oversight and standardization around classification and the cumulative effect of consuming a number of products that are just under the 20 ppm cutoff.

Nadine also shares a list of companies she trusts to consistently produce gluten-free products and offers suggestions around new food options we might explore. Listen in and learn to choose the nutrient-dense foods that will help your body heal!

What’s Discussed:

The importance of questioning the source of your information

  • Gluten-free groups take money from sponsors (corporations, pharmaceutical companies)

 Why Nadine avoids the ‘gluten removed’ label

 The questions to ask about gluten-free products

  • Is it manufactured in a designated facility?
  • From where do they source the ingredients?
  • Do they batch test those ingredients?

 The cumulative effect of eating many products just under 20 ppm

 Reliable companies that consistently produce truly gluten-free products

 The challenges faced by newly diagnosed celiac patients

  • Feeling different
  • Loss of convenience

 Why Nadine avoids gluten-free breads

 New food options to explore as a celiac patient

 Why Nadine recommends reevaluating the foods you consume

  • Ensure they are nutrient dense, don’t cause inflammation

 Why you can’t trust product labels

  • Corporations given six months to update after ingredients change
  • Not required to test products labeled gluten-free (no oversight, standardization)

 Nadine’s rules around choosing products

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture ingredients

Resources:

Canadian Celiac Association

The Gluten Dude on Facebook

Ground Breaker Brewing

The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America

Enjoy Life Foods

Glutino

Namaste Foods

Pamela’s Products

Jilz Crackers

Lundberg Family Farms

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Casabi Crackers & Flatbread

Jackson’s Honest

Kettle Brand

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Applegate

Beeler’s Pure Pork

Hempler’s

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Psychology of Eating Gluten Free EP045

We all just want to fit in, so it can be embarrassing to have special needs when it comes to your diet. Whether you are gluten-free, Paleo, or suffering from food allergies, a feeling of isolation is not uncommon. After all, you have to eat differently from the rest of your friends, family, or colleagues—and that makes you stand out. You run the risk of being perceived as picky or annoying, when the truth is that certain foods are toxic to your system!

Today the Gluten Free RN speaks to the psychology of eating gluten-free, explaining the sense of disbelief many gluten-sensitive individuals feel when the food they love turns out to be poison. She discusses ‘food ideology’ and why changing your diet can be so challenging.

Nadine also covers the doubt, mocking, and even anger that celiac and gluten-sensitive individuals face, offering suggestions for building connections with a like-minded, gluten-free community. Listen in as she outlines her approach to dating on a Paleo diet and reassuring family and friends who find a gluten-free diet too restrictive for kids. Learn to be your own best advocate and resist the social pressure to eat the standard American diet!    

What’s Discussed:

Why gluten sensitive patients must be willing to experiment

  • Learn how body works best
  • Identify foods that allow body to heal
  • Pinpoint foods that cause symptoms

A downtown Corvallis business owner’s testimonial

  • Couldn’t get doctor to test for celiac disease
  • Family gave hard time
  • Gluten-free for year
  • Bloating, abdominal pain went away
  • Head clear

How to research the possibility that gluten is causing your symptoms

  • Search PubMed
  • Use both spellings (celiac, coeliac)

Why people are resistant to diet change

  • Subscribe to particular food ideology
  • Media, social pressure to eat standard American diet

The difficulty around getting a celiac diagnosis

The value of preventative medicine

Dating on a gluten-free diet

  • Look for someone open to new ideas
  • Nadine’s partner is supportive, willing to change
  • On food path together
  • Health benefits whether celiac or not

The human need to be part of a community

  • Celiac patients may feel isolated from family, at work/school
  • Find ‘your people’ (gluten-free support group, cross-fit gym)

The global shift to a Western diet

  • Export fast food to world
  • Increased consumption of wheat, barley, rye and oats

Why Nadine recommends a Whole30 diet

  • Remove all grains, dairy, alcohol and sugar
  • Eat meat and fish, nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables
  • Allows body to reboot
  • Evaluate how you feel

The narcotic-like effect of gluten on the brain

  • Comfort foods (pasta, pizza) contain wheat, dairy
  • Cause chemical reaction in brain

Nadine’s recent experience in hospitals

  • Only nutrient-deficient, packaged foods available
  • Offerings toxic, full of sugar

Nadine’s rules around ingredients in packaged foods

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture every ingredient

Why people on a gluten-free diet are reluctant to tell others

  • Don’t want to be difficult, needy
  • Don’t want to call attention, be seen as ‘other’
  • May be questioned or face anger, mocking
  • Demoralizing to go to restaurant, grocery store (can’t eat 90%)

How to approach neighbors or family who view a gluten-free diet as too restrictive for kids

  • Ensure that kids are healthy, thriving
  • Let them know ‘not missing out’

The psychology of denial

  • Some celiac patients believe okay to cheat
  • Bread crumb, dusting of flour can cause autoimmune response

Nadine’s opposition to a gluten challenge

  • Can cause organ damage
  • Some never recover

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Resources:

 

Books by Dr. Rodney Ford

PubMed

The Whole30 Program

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

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Staying Healthy in the Hospital with Celiac Disease EP044

Hospitalization is nearly always the result of a sudden, unexpected event. So how do you plan ahead to keep yourself safe in the event that a health emergency lands you in the nearest emergency room? What steps can you take to stay healthy in the hospital as a celiac or gluten-sensitive patient?

Thanks to a listener suggestion and Nadine’s recent experience with a client recovering from surgery, the Gluten Free RN is addressing the cross-contamination risk in hospital kitchens and the nutrient-deficient foods available in hospital gift shops and vending machines. She also covers the responsibilities of the pharmacist to ensure that medications are gluten-free as well as resources you can use to verify that your prescriptions are safe.

Listen in as Nadine explains the significance of having an advocate with you at the hospital, who can prevent inadvertent gluten exposure and bring in the nutrient-dense food you need to heal. Learn how to communicate your needs as a celiac patient to resistant doctors, nurses, pharmacists and RDs, and plan ahead to stay safe and healthy—even when you’re in the vulnerable position of being in the hospital.    

What’s Discussed: 

Why celiac patients should be skeptical of gluten-free menus in the hospital

  • Nadine has patient in hospital for hip surgery
  • Found out food all cooked on same grill
  • Risk of cross-contamination very high
  • Gluten protein extremely heat stable
  • Made arrangements to bring in safe food

The quality of food available in hospitals

  • Gift shops, kitchens and vending machines ‘abysmal’
  • Often nutrient-deficient, high in gluten
  • Gas station lineup of junk food

How to verify that medications are gluten-free

The role of the pharmacist in providing gluten-free medication

  • Job to ensure safety
  • Should never say ‘don’t have time,’ pass responsibility to patient
  • Must check prescriptions, over-the-counter meds, topical treatments
  • Enteral supplements (through tube) must be checked as well

What you can do to communicate your needs to hospital staff

The significance of having an advocate

  • Friend/family member, fellow support group member or paid advocate
  • Provide access to safe food brought in (too many variables in hospital)
  • Can speak for you when vulnerable (e.g.: crackers after surgery)
  • Assign person before in position to need (sudden, unexpected events)

Gluten-free options for patients on a liquid or soft food diet

  • Bone broth
  • Soup with vegetables

 The role of nutrient-dense food in healing the body

  • Bring 100% gluten-free ‘safe stash’ to hospital
  • Refer to Nadine’s list of nutrient-dense options
  • Remember products labeled gluten-free = < 20ppm (not zero)

The Catch 22 of gluten and hospitals

  • Getting hit with gluten can put in hospital (i.e.: dehydration, GI bleed)
  • Difficult to stay gluten-free in hospital
  • Already at-risk to get sicker

How antibiotics affect your system

  • Wipe out good normal flora along with bad bacteria
  • Need good probiotics, fermented foods to reestablish microbiome

 

Resources:

Gluten Free Drugs Website

Dough Nation by Nadine Grzeskowiak

Emergency Preparedness with Nutrient Dense Foods

Gluten Free RN Episode 15

GIG Resource: Hospital Stays Made Safe

Gluten Intolerance Group of North America

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

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Eating Disorders and Celiac Disease EP043

Imagine being admitted to a psychiatric hospital and accused of being a pathological liar because no matter how carefully you follow the high-carb diet prescribed by your physicians, you continue to lose weight. In the introduction to his book, How Doctors Think, Dr. Jerome Groopman shares the story of a woman who was misdiagnosed with anorexia nervosa. The patient was ready to give up when one last doctor discovered villous atrophy and determined that it was celiac disease—not an eating disorder—that was causing her malnourishment.

Today the Gluten Free RN explores the reasons why celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are often mistaken for anorexia nervosa. She shares the limited research in the field, as well as the symptoms related to malnourishment that may be caused by gluten, including several mental health disorders.

Listen in as Nadine covers the use of PWAG (people who avoid gluten) as a derogatory term and shares her frustration with labels like ‘orthorexia nervosa’ which imply that gluten-sensitive patients are obsessed with healthy food: ‘I avoid gluten like the plague because it is, in fact, the plague for those of us who have celiac disease.’   

 What’s Discussed: 

The use of PWAG as a derogatory term

  • ‘People who avoid gluten’
  • Half of people in US
  • Implies food crazed/obsessed

 The new term orthorexia nervosa

  • Refers to obsessive behavior in pursuit of healthy diet
  • Not clinical term/official diagnosis

 The concept of food as medicine

 Anecdotal evidence of celiac disease misdiagnosed as anorexia

  • Introduction of Dr. Jerome Groopman’s book, How Doctors Think
  • Woman admitted to psychiatric hospital (thought to be pathological liar)
  • Continued to lose weight despite prescribed high-carb diet
  • Biopsy revealed Marsh 4 damage
  • Gluten-free diet resolved symptoms

 Why celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are misdiagnosed as eating disorders

  • Inability to absorb nutrients results in severe weight loss, malnutrition
  • Become picky eaters because food causes suffering
  • Practice food avoidance

 The prevalence of celiac disease

  • 3% of the US population
  • Millions undiagnosed

 How gluten affects a celiac patient

  • Gluten protein as neurotoxin
  • Damages intestines
  • Impairs immune system
  • Causes inflammation
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Joint, muscle pain
  • Any -itis

 Nadine’s recommended variation of a Paleo diet

  • Local, organic, whole foods
  • 100% grass-fed beef (no antibiotics/hormones)
  • Nutrient dense

 The study of celiac disease and eating disorders

  • Very few research studies in last 11 years
  • Handful of case studies in literature

 The issues associated with malnourishment

  • Little body fat
  • Cachectic
  • Hormonal disruption
  • Thyroid issues

 The anger and contempt Nadine has experienced as the Gluten Free RN

  • Gluten, dairy associated with comfort food
  • People resistant to give up

 The mental health issues associated with malnourishment

  • Significant cognitive impairment
  • Hypoxia
  • Brain atrophy (shrinking)

 The effect of gluten on epithelial tissue

  • Leaky skin, lungs, blood vessels, blood-brain barrier
  • Causes increased/decreased blood pressure, POTS

 The consequences of gluten getting through the blood-brain barrier

  • Causes hypoxia
  • Brain needs oxygen to work appropriately
  • Brain fog (irritability, anger)
  • Early onset dementia

 The shocking statistics around psychotropic medication in the US

  • Up to 50% of population on anti-depressants, mood-altering drugs
  • Gluten-free diet could help ‘get brain back’

 Nadine’s advice for parents of children who miss multiple days of school

  • Could be undiagnosed celiac disease
  • No downside to clinical trial of gluten-, dairy-free diet
  • Consider Whole30 Diet (eliminate sugar, grains, legumes)

 The process of a gluten detox

  • Gluten has narcotic-like effect on brain
  • May feel worse before you feel better
  • One day to two months

 The benefits of maintaining a gluten-free diet

  • Anxiety goes away
  • Mood improves
  • Able to sleep
  • Pain resolves
  • Heal intestines, epithelial tissue
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Heal immune system
  • Brain receives necessary oxygen

 The foods Nadine recommends as part of a super-good, high-fat diet

  • Avocados
  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Coconut milk
  • Hemp milk

 Why Nadine chooses not to eat if there is any risk of gluten contamination in her food

 The places where gluten hides

  • Single bread crumb
  • Dusting of flour
  • Oil French fries cooked in
  • Personal care products

Resources:

 

How Doctors Think by Jerome Groopman, MD

Dr. Groopman’s NPR Interview

“The Interaction Between Eating Disorders and Celiac Disease: An Exploration of 10 Cases” in the European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology

“Orthorexia and Anorexia Nervosa: Two Distinct Phenomena? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Orthorexic Behaviours in BMC Psychiatry

“Predictors of Orthorexic Behaviours in Patients with Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Study” in BMC Psychiatry

“Eating Disorders and Celiac Disease: A Case Report” in The International Journal of Eating Disorders

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Down, Turner and Williams Syndrome EP018

The medical community has an obligation to protect vulnerable populations, speaking up for any group that may not be able to advocate for themselves, and patients with Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome certainly fall into this category. Yet one facet of their health – one that could vastly improve quality of life – often goes overlooked.

There is a high prevalence of celiac disease among individuals with Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome, and it is recommended that these patients get tested annually. Unfortunately, many of the symptoms of celiac disease are attributed to the syndrome instead, and gluten sensitivity goes undiagnosed.

Today Nadine shares several case studies as well as her own experience working with patients with developmental delays. She covers the high incidence of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome patients, the signs and symptoms of gluten damage, and the importance of annual screening in this population.

What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in individuals with Down, Tuner and Williams syndrome

  • Annual testing is recommended
  • Signs and symptoms can be eliminated with a gluten-free diet

Tiffany’s story

  • Williams syndrome patient
  • Suffered from stage 4 liver failure and diabetes
  • Endured cracked, bleeding skin and fluid in the abdomen
  • Tested positive for celiac disease
  • Gluten-free diet resolved most of her symptoms

Alternatives to the standard blood test that could reveal non-celiac gluten sensitivity in Down syndrome patients

  • The anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) is an excellent biomarker
  • In a study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, 41% of Down syndrome patients had AGA antibodies

 The importance of testing family members

  • A mother who is malnourished during pregnancy may have a child with Down, Turner or Williams syndrome
  • Celiac disease may disrupt fetal development

The overlap of celiac disease and Down syndrome

  • Study found that 18 of 284 subjects ages two to 15 tested positive for celiac disease
  • In another study, 11 of 47 had positive blood tests

Symptoms of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Gas
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Short stature
  • Brittle bones
  • Osteoporosis
  • Osteopenia
  • Thyroid issues
  • Anemia
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Skin rash
  • Decreased appetite
  • Yeast overgrowth
  • Lichen planus
  • Difficulty swallowing

Nadine’s story of an autistic patient

  • Sweet gentleman who lived in group home
  • Suffered from diabetes, repeated infections and self-harm
  • Paleo diet made him calmer, didn’t irritate his throat
  • He enjoyed an improved quality of life

Cases of asymptomatic celiac disease in children with Down syndrome

  • Study published in the International Journal of Pediatrics
  • Toddlers screened at around 24 months
  • Biopsy proven celiac disease identified in 3-9% of children with Down syndrome
  • Not all patients with positive screens receive a biopsy if asymptomatic
  • One child in the study gained weight and energy on a gluten-free diet
  • A second child had less constipation and diarrhea
  • Follow-up study reported that 66% had health improvement

Resources Mentioned:

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Down’s Syndrome Patients Revealed Cases of Subtotal Villous Atrophy Without Typical for Celiac Disease HLA-DQ and Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies” from the World Journal of Gastroenterology

“Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Down’s Syndrome” from the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

“Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less” from the International Journal of Pediatrics

Other Resources:

“Celiac Disease” from the Pediatric Gastroenterology Board Review Manual

“The Coexistence of Down Syndrome and a Triad Consisting of: Coeliac Disease, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus and Congenital Hypothyroidism” from Down Syndrome Research and Practice

“Coeliac Disease in Williams Syndrome” from the Journal of Medical Genetics

“Turner Syndrome and Celiac Disease: A Case-Control Study” from Pediatrics

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease Worldwide EP016


Wherever there is wheat, there is susceptibility to celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Gluten is a growing global problem, exacerbated by the popularity of the western diet around the world. This issue has personal, social and political implications as it places a significant economic burden on individuals, communities, and even entire nations.

 The Gluten Free RN brings us a ‘big picture’ perspective of the celiac and gluten sensitive population around the world, as we learn about how other countries support these individuals. She also covers the industries that have begun to recognize the power of the gluten free population as a consumer group.

 Nadine will be doing some globe-trotting herself come September for the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, and she is currently soliciting advice regarding where and how to eat safely during her travels in India and Thailand. Feel free to message her with recommendations!  

What’s Discussed: 

When and where wheat originated

  • Fertile Crescent (Northern Africa and the Middle East)
  • 10,000 years ago
  • High prevalence of celiac disease in these regions now

 The International Celiac Disease Symposium

  • September 2017 in New Delhi
  • Held every two years
  • Scientists, medical professionals and other interested parties
  • Share latest research

 Where celiac disease is common

  • Anywhere people are eating grains
  • More widespread as other regions adopt a western diet
  • Increased risk in Punjab population of India

 The basics of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Can present in many ways (300+ signs and symptoms)
  • #1 autoimmune disease in the world
  • More likely to recover the sooner identified
  • 30-50% of the population carry the genes (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8) that indicate predisposition
  • Body doesn’t have enzymes to break down gluten proteins
  • Gluten damages intestines
  • Nadine recommends adopting a Paleo diet in order to heal

 The World Health Organization’s “burden of disease”

  • Measures the impact of celiac disease
  • Based on financial cost, mortality, morbidity, etc.

 How Italy supports celiac patients

  • Provide extra days off work for doctor’s appointments, shopping
  • Ship gluten free food

 Potential symptoms of celiac disease affecting every ethnicity

  • Odd gait (gluten ataxia)
  • Skin rash (dermatitis herpetiformis)

 The power of celiac and gluten-sensitive patients as a group

  • Largest untapped market in the world
  • Some industries taking notice (pharmaceutical, food)
  • Use influence to heal selves and educate others

 Why some people are so resistant to eliminating grains

  • Sometimes crave what is bad for you
  • Nutritional deficiencies may cause addiction

 Resources Mentioned:

 Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies –  by Jared M. Diamond

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism