fruits and vegetables

Go Gluten Free for Good EP052

How do you successfully transition to and maintain a 100% gluten-free diet for the rest of your life? The prospect of eliminating wheat, barley and rye from your diet may seem daunting, but it is possible to go gluten free for good—for the good of your family and your health!

The Gluten Free RN explains the addictive nature of gluten and what to expect during the detox process as you begin your gluten-free journey. She offers valuable advice around how to choose the best quality food products while avoiding potential sources of cross-contamination.

Nadine discusses the need for supplements that will help you heal faster and more completely, speaking to the vitamin levels you should monitor along the way. Listen and learn her best tips for navigating the grocery store and maintaining a positive attitude throughout the process of going gluten-free—for GOOD!

What’s Discussed:

The addictive nature of gluten

  • Gliadin, gluten proteins bind to opioid receptors
  • Wheat, barley and rye are cheap and readily available

What to expect during the detox process

  • Different for everyone
  • Consider elimination diet to reboot system
  • May feel worse before feel better
  • Headaches, low energy and feeling hungry are common

Why you shouldn’t cheat on a gluten-free diet

  • Same autoimmune response, even if symptom-free

Potential sources of cross-contamination

  • Processed foods
  • Unwashed fresh fruits, vegetables
  • Bulk bins
  • Restaurants
  • Own home (i.e.: cutting boards, hands, pets, utensils, appliances, etc.)

Nadine’s rules around choosing quality food products

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Picture every ingredient
  • Certified gluten-free
  • 100% grain-free

Why there is no such thing as cheap food

  • Pay for quick-fixes to treat symptoms

The necessity of additional vitamins, supplements

  • Helps heal faster, more completely
  • Use multivitamin, fish oil, pre- and probiotics
  • Check levels of D3, Zinc, B6 and B12
  • Liquid, chewables and capsules are easier to break down

Nadine’s advice around navigating the grocery store

  • Plan menus in advance
  • Bring list of safe foods
  • Read labels carefully
  • Consider local co-ops, natural grocers and farmers markets

Nadine’s best tips for going gluten-free

  • Concentrate on what you can eat
  • Accept more cooking, baking and meal planning
  • Find support group
  • Stay current on research, food labeling
  • Practice mindfulness, maintain positive attitude

Resources:

Whole30

Country Life Vitamins

Robb Wolf’s Paleo Food Matrix

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

healthy food

Nutrient Dense Foods EP051

‘When in doubt, go without.’

The problem with processed food is that you simply can’t be sure that it is gluten-free. The risk of cross-contamination is high, and no one at the big corporations is accountable for your health. Not to mention the fact that processed foods have been irradiated to make them shelf-stable, effectively killing any probiotics. Even certified gluten-free products are often low in nutrients, high in calories—and expensive!

So what should you eat? The Gluten Free RN is on the case with her best suggestions around finding organic, whole foods that contain the healthy fat you need to heal. She explains her revised, gluten-free version of the food pyramid and discusses how these nutrient-dense foods support the healing process.

Nadine provides a list of the best nutrient-dense foods, offering the benefits of each. She also speaks to the most appropriate vitamins and supplements available to solve your nutrient deficiencies. You are what you eat, so make sure you are filling your tank with nutrient-dense foods that will improve your health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed:

How nutrient dense foods support healing

  • Regenerate villi
  • Reduce inflammation of intestines
  • Heal immune system

Why Nadine recommends staying away from gluten-free junk foods

  • Low in nutrients, high in calories
  • Risk of cross-contamination (processed in facilities with wheat products)

The best sources of nutrient-dense foods

  • Whole foods, organic
  • Farmers market (few/no fertilizers)

Why shelf-stable products lack nutrients

  • Food dead from irradiation, no live probiotics

The risk of contamination in processed foods

  • No one accountable at big corporation
  • ‘When in doubt, go without’

Nadine’s revised food pyramid

  • Fruits and vegetables at base
  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts, seeds and berries

The importance of eating healthy fats

  • Heals intestines
  • Absorb fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • Fix deficiencies
  • Healthy brain cells, nervous system
  • Balance hormones

Nadine’s recommendations around the best nutrient-dense foods

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Leafy greens (e.g.: kale, collard greens)
  • Berries
  • Coconuts
  • Black molasses
  • Avocados
  • Pumpkin, chia seeds
  • Meat and fish
  • High-quality eggs
  • Licorice root, peppermint tea
  • Cinnamon

Nadine’s vegetable challenge

  • Expand your vegetable repertoire
  • Try one new veggie per week

Nadine’s suggestions around additional vitamins, supplements

  • Good quality multivitamin
  • Fish oil (i.e.: Nordic Naturals)
  • Pre/probiotics
  • Vitamin D

How to avoid cross-contamination

  • Avoid bulk food bins
  • Wash produce

Resources:

Midway Farms on Facebook

Nordic Naturals

Country Life Vitamins

Bluebonnet Nutrition

Pure Encapsulations

National Nurses in Business Association

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

Christmas cookies

Managing the Holidays with Celiac Disease EP050

With the approach of the holidays, you may be nervous about navigating family and workplace gatherings—especially if you are newly diagnosed with celiac disease. How do you explain your dietary restrictions and keep yourself safe, eating well without getting ‘glutened’?

Today the Gluten Free RN shares her best advice around managing the holidays with celiac disease. She offers ten key tenants to help you enjoy the holiday season and mitigate stress, without feeling like you’re missing out. She shares some things you need to avoid, including unsafe situations, people who make you miserable, and cheating on your gluten-free diet! But she also discusses strategies you can implement to make the season bright, such as creating new traditions, getting creative in the kitchen, and finding your tribe—the people who will support you in your gluten-free journey.

Nadine also gives tips around where to go for gluten-free ingredients and holiday recipes, and how to develop a backup plan so you won’t go hungry if the food you encounter is questionable. You are likely to encounter well-intentioned friends and family members who have no idea how to feed you safely at holiday parties. Listen in and learn how to be clear about your dietary needs and take control of your health without isolating yourself from loved ones during this most wonderful time of the year!

What’s Discussed:

#1 Don’t eat anything contaminated with wheat

  • Cannot eat center of pie, any part of turkey with bread stuffing

#2 Beware of good-intentioned people

  • Don’t eat anything questionable
  • Bring a snack with you just in case

#3 Be prepared to establish new traditions

  • Get creative in kitchen

#4 Don’t isolate yourself

  • Find support group, create your own

#5 Gather recipes early

#6 Order ingredients in advance

  • Consider organic, free range turkey

#7 Don’t invite people who make you miserable

  • Set clear boundaries (no complaints, ridicule)

#8 Eat before you go or take your own plate

  • ‘Desperate people make desperate decisions’
  • Take a dish to share, take your portion first

#9 Don’t be a victim

  • Be clear about your needs

#10 Find your people

  • Those who truly love you don’t want you to be sick

Resources:

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Paleo Magazine

Paleo Principles: The Science Behind the Paleo Template, Step-by-Step Guides, Meal Plans, and 200+ Healthy & Delicious Recipes for Real Life by Sarah Ballantyne

Sarah Ballantyne on Instagram

Glutenpro

EnteroLab

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

lyme disease rash

Lyme Infection and Celiac Disease EP049

If you’ve been following a strict gluten-free diet, but continue to suffer from lingering neurological symptoms, you may need to explore the possibility that you have Lyme disease. In fact, there are many parallels between celiac disease and Lyme, and the Gluten Free RN has called in an expert to discuss the similarities between the two disorders and why a gluten-free diet is part of the proper treatment for both.

Dr. Usha Honeyman, a chiropractic and naturopathic physician out of Corvallis, Oregon, joins Nadine to explain the fundamentals of Lyme disease. She shares her best advice around prevention and treatment, exploring why it can be difficult to get an accurate diagnosis.

Nadine and Usha also cover the inflammation of the gut that plagues both celiac and Lyme patients, the neurological component of Lyme disease, and the relationship between Lyme and illnesses like MS, Parkinson’s and ALS. Listen in to understand what can happen when Lyme goes untreated and how antibiotics coupled with a gluten-free diet may restore your health!

What’s Discussed:

The fundamentals of Lyme disease

  • Most common insect-borne disease in US
  • Primarily carried by tics (disable immune system at bite site)
  • CDC estimates 300K new cases each year

How to prevent Lyme infection

How the political controversy in medicine has led to conflicting information around Lyme disease

The treatment for Lyme disease

  • Long-term antibiotics
  • T3 to raise body temperature, make white blood cells more efficient
  • Probiotics to support immune system

Why Dr. Honeyman advises Lyme patients to go gluten-free

  • Lyme causes inflammation of gut

The neurological component of Lyme disease

  • Spirochetes permeate blood-brain barrier
  • Cause brain fog, balance issues, sensory disorders, etc.

The alpha-gal reaction in Lyme patients in the Southeast US

The strange gait and lower-face movement in Lyme patients

  • Bell’s palsy is red flag for Lyme disease

The importance of having a Lyme-literate doctor

  • Skin scraping of rash for diagnosis available in research setting
  • ELISA and Western blot miss 80-90% of Lyme patients

The consequences of untreated Lyme disease

The three forms of Borrelia

  • Spirochete-form, intracellular and cystic

 Resources:

Dr. Honeyman’s Website

CDC Website

Picaridin

Natrapel

Insect Shield Clothing

Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar—Your Brain’s Silent Killers by David Perlmutter

Under Our Skin Film

International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

Certified Gluten Free

Gluten Free Products EP048

The increasing number of gluten-free products on the market can be both a blessing and a curse. Yes, it gives us more options, but are those options truly safe and healthy?

Today the Gluten Free RN goes over the important questions to ask about the products you consume, explaining how the foods promoted by some gluten-free groups may be influenced by their corporate sponsors. She reminds us why we can’t simply trust the products labeled ‘gluten-free’ or ‘gluten removed,’ discussing the lack of oversight and standardization around classification and the cumulative effect of consuming a number of products that are just under the 20 ppm cutoff.

Nadine also shares a list of companies she trusts to consistently produce gluten-free products and offers suggestions around new food options we might explore. Listen in and learn to choose the nutrient-dense foods that will help your body heal!

What’s Discussed:

The importance of questioning the source of your information

  • Gluten-free groups take money from sponsors (corporations, pharmaceutical companies)

Why Nadine avoids the ‘gluten removed’ label

The questions to ask about gluten-free products

  • Is it manufactured in a designated facility?
  • From where do they source the ingredients?
  • Do they batch test those ingredients?

The cumulative effect of eating many products just under 20 ppm

Reliable companies that consistently produce truly gluten-free products

The challenges faced by newly diagnosed celiac patients

  • Feeling different
  • Loss of convenience

Why Nadine avoids gluten-free breads

New food options to explore as a celiac patient

Why Nadine recommends reevaluating the foods you consume

  • Ensure they are nutrient dense, don’t cause inflammation

Why you can’t trust product labels

  • Corporations given six months to update after ingredients change
  • Not required to test products labeled gluten-free (no oversight, standardization)

Nadine’s rules around choosing products

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture ingredients

Resources:

Canadian Celiac Association

The Gluten Dude on Facebook

Ground Breaker Brewing

The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America

Enjoy Life Foods

Glutino

Namaste Foods

Pamela’s Products

Jilz Crackers

Lundberg Family Farms

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Casabi Crackers & Flatbread

Jackson’s Honest

Kettle Brand

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Applegate

Beeler’s Pure Pork

Hempler’s

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

Gluten Free RN

FAQ’s About Celiac Disease Answered EP047

How do I get over feeling sad about giving up the foods I love? Don’t celiac patients look a certain way? Can I eat wheat when I travel to Europe?

Today the Gluten Free RN is answering your frequently asked questions about celiac disease, clearing up misconceptions around the safety of wheat in Europe, the appearance of a celiac patient, and the percentage of the population that suffers from gluten sensitivity. She speaks to the challenges of getting your healthcare provider to do appropriate testing for celiac disease and the learning curve associated with changing your diet.

Nadine also explains the risks of embarking on a gluten challenge and the benefits of a super-good high fat diet. She discusses why a single breadcrumb can trigger an autoimmune response and how she uses tools like a Nima Sensor when she eats out. Listen in and learn why one negative test doesn’t rule you out for celiac disease, especially if you suffer from type 1 diabetes.

Having celiac disease doesn’t mean you have to live in a bubble. The Gluten Free RN wants to give you the answers you need to navigate the world—happy, healthy and gluten-free!

What’s Discussed:

‘My sister has celiac disease, but I tested negative. I do have type 1 diabetes… What should I do?’

  • Get genetic test for HLA-DQ2, HLA-DQ8
  • Virtually every type 1 diabetic is gene carrier
  • One test doesn’t rule you out

‘Why do you use a Nima Sensor or EZ Gluten test strips? Doesn’t it give you a false sense of security?’

  • Have to trust others to prepare food when out
  • Not foolproof, but does give decent idea

‘A single breadcrumb or dusting of flour can trigger an autoimmune response? Really?’

‘I am overweight, I have dark hair, and I’m not of European descent. Don’t celiac patients look a certain way?’

  • Can’t see genes, celiac disease can affect any population worldwide
  • Overweight patients tend to be malnourished (unable to absorb nutrients)
  • Never rule out based on appearance, may not show physical symptoms

‘Why do you recommend a super-good high-fat diet?’

‘I’m already on a gluten-free diet. Do I need to go back to gluten to prove I have celiac disease?’

‘My cousin was just diagnosed with celiac disease, and she is very sad about giving up the food she grew up with. How can she get started on a gluten-free diet?’

  • Steep learning curve goes with process
  • Okay to feel sad, angry
  • Remember you will get better without surgery, medication
  • Try to see as an adventure

‘Why won’t my doctor order tests for celiac disease?’

  • Countries with for-profit healthcare tend to do poor job of testing, follow-up care
  • Fragmented, inaccurate education around celiac disease
  • Be own best advocate

‘Can I eat wheat in Europe?’

‘Is it true that celiac disease affects 1% of the population?’

  • 1% translates to 3M people
  • 3% is more accurate statistic
  • Won’t know for sure until conduct mass screening

Resources:

Gluten Free RN EP027: Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

food on the table

Where Gluten Hides EP046


Never assume. It makes an ass of u and me!

Not only do assumptions make you feel foolish, they can be dangerous. If you suffer from celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, assuming that a product is safe and gluten-free can be hazardous to your health! Gluten is hiding is some surprising places, from cashews to PlayDoh, and it is in your best interest to remember that anything processed in the same facility with wheat is at risk for contamination.

Today the Gluten Free RN shares the many places she has discovered gluten ‘hiding in plain sight,’ including personal care products, olive oil and communion wafers. She offers advice around supporting companies that are 100% gluten-free, alternatives to gluten-containing products, and choosing nutrient-dense foods that will help you heal.

Nadine also covers labels, discussing why you can’t necessarily trust the information you find there, the many different names for wheat to look out for, and why you should take a look even when the product should be naturally gluten-free. She reveals some of her favorite gluten-free products as well as several companies that are committed to maintaining gluten-zero production facilities. Listen in and learn how to make good choices—without giving up the activities you love. Eating gluten-free doesn’t have to be a punishment, and the Gluten Free RN can’t wait to share!

What’s Discussed:

Why Nadine sticks with clearly marked gluten-free products

Some of the surprising places gluten hides

  • Olive oil, kombucha, hard ciders, smoothies and other drinks
  • Alcohol and malted beverages
  • Lipsticks, lip balms and gloss
  • Communion wafers
  • Supplements and medications
  • Play-Doh

Why you can never assume a product is naturally gluten-free

  • Anything processed in same facility with wheat is at-risk for contamination

Why Nadine encourages the support of companies striving to be 100% gluten-free

  • Don’t have to worry about safety
  • Sends message to companies with unclear labels

The many different names for wheat to watch out for on labels

Alternatives to gluten-containing products like bread, crackers and chocolate

Why you can’t trust labels

  • Companies have six months to change a label after ingredients, info has changed
  • Must read label every time buy product, refill prescription medication

The cumulative effect of consuming products that contain just under 20 ppm of gluten

Why Nadine urges you to be picky

  • Don’t settle for cheap filler foods
  • Only nutrient-dense foods will help you heal

Resources:

Desert Essence

Savonnerie

Schmidt’s Naturals

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Jilz Crackers

eatingEVOLVED

PASCHA Chocolate

Enjoy Life Foods

Ground Breaker Brewing

Red Apple Lipstick

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

dining at a restaurant

The Psychology of Eating Gluten Free EP045

We all just want to fit in, so it can be embarrassing to have special needs when it comes to your diet. Whether you are gluten-free, Paleo, or suffering from food allergies, a feeling of isolation is not uncommon. After all, you have to eat differently from the rest of your friends, family, or colleagues—and that makes you stand out. You run the risk of being perceived as picky or annoying, when the truth is that certain foods are toxic to your system!

Today the Gluten Free RN speaks to the psychology of eating gluten-free, explaining the sense of disbelief many gluten-sensitive individuals feel when the food they love turns out to be poison. She discusses ‘food ideology’ and why changing your diet can be so challenging.

Nadine also covers the doubt, mocking, and even anger that celiac and gluten-sensitive individuals face, offering suggestions for building connections with a like-minded, gluten-free community. Listen in as she outlines her approach to dating on a Paleo diet and reassuring family and friends who find a gluten-free diet too restrictive for kids. Learn to be your own best advocate and resist the social pressure to eat the standard American diet!

What’s Discussed:

Why gluten sensitive patients must be willing to experiment

  • Learn how body works best
  • Identify foods that allow body to heal
  • Pinpoint foods that cause symptoms

A downtown Corvallis business owner’s testimonial

  • Couldn’t get doctor to test for celiac disease
  • Family gave hard time
  • Gluten-free for year
  • Bloating, abdominal pain went away
  • Head clear

How to research the possibility that gluten is causing your symptoms

  • Search PubMed
  • Use both spellings (celiac, coeliac)

Why people are resistant to diet change

  • Subscribe to particular food ideology
  • Media, social pressure to eat standard American diet

The difficulty around getting a celiac diagnosis

The value of preventative medicine

Dating on a gluten-free diet

  • Look for someone open to new ideas
  • Nadine’s partner is supportive, willing to change
  • On food path together
  • Health benefits whether celiac or not

The human need to be part of a community

  • Celiac patients may feel isolated from family, at work/school
  • Find ‘your people’ (gluten-free support group, cross-fit gym)

The global shift to a Western diet

  • Export fast food to world
  • Increased consumption of wheat, barley, rye and oats

Why Nadine recommends a Whole30 diet

  • Remove all grains, dairy, alcohol and sugar
  • Eat meat and fish, nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables
  • Allows body to reboot
  • Evaluate how you feel

The narcotic-like effect of gluten on the brain

  • Comfort foods (pasta, pizza) contain wheat, dairy
  • Cause chemical reaction in brain

Nadine’s recent experience in hospitals

  • Only nutrient-deficient, packaged foods available
  • Offerings toxic, full of sugar

Nadine’s rules around ingredients in packaged foods

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture every ingredient

Why people on a gluten-free diet are reluctant to tell others

  • Don’t want to be difficult, needy
  • Don’t want to call attention, be seen as ‘other’
  • May be questioned or face anger, mocking
  • Demoralizing to go to restaurant, grocery store (can’t eat 90%)

How to approach neighbors or family who view a gluten-free diet as too restrictive for kids

  • Ensure that kids are healthy, thriving
  • Let them know ‘not missing out’

The psychology of denial

  • Some celiac patients believe okay to cheat
  • Bread crumb, dusting of flour can cause autoimmune response

Nadine’s opposition to a gluten challenge

  • Can cause organ damage
  • Some never recover

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Resources:

Books by Dr. Rodney Ford

PubMed

The Whole30 Program

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

hospital

Staying Healthy in the Hospital with Celiac Disease EP044

Hospitalization is nearly always the result of a sudden, unexpected event. So how do you plan ahead to keep yourself safe in the event that a health emergency lands you in the nearest emergency room? What steps can you take to stay healthy in the hospital as a celiac or gluten-sensitive patient?

Thanks to a listener suggestion and Nadine’s recent experience with a client recovering from surgery, the Gluten Free RN is addressing the cross-contamination risk in hospital kitchens and the nutrient-deficient foods available in hospital gift shops and vending machines. She also covers the responsibilities of the pharmacist to ensure that medications are gluten-free as well as resources you can use to verify that your prescriptions are safe.

Listen in as Nadine explains the significance of having an advocate with you at the hospital, who can prevent inadvertent gluten exposure and bring in the nutrient-dense food you need to heal. Learn how to communicate your needs as a celiac patient to resistant doctors, nurses, pharmacists and RDs, and plan ahead to stay safe and healthy—even when you’re in the vulnerable position of being in the hospital.

What’s Discussed:

Why celiac patients should be skeptical of gluten-free menus in the hospital

  • Nadine has patient in hospital for hip surgery
  • Found out food all cooked on same grill
  • Risk of cross-contamination very high
  • Gluten protein extremely heat stable
  • Made arrangements to bring in safe food

The quality of food available in hospitals

  • Gift shops, kitchens and vending machines ‘abysmal’
  • Often nutrient-deficient, high in gluten
  • Gas station lineup of junk food

How to verify that medications are gluten-free

The role of the pharmacist in providing gluten-free medication

  • Job to ensure safety
  • Should never say ‘don’t have time,’ pass responsibility to patient
  • Must check prescriptions, over-the-counter meds, topical treatments
  • Enteral supplements (through tube) must be checked as well

What you can do to communicate your needs to hospital staff

The significance of having an advocate

  • Friend/family member, fellow support group member or paid advocate
  • Provide access to safe food brought in (too many variables in hospital)
  • Can speak for you when vulnerable (e.g.: crackers after surgery)
  • Assign person before in position to need (sudden, unexpected events)

Gluten-free options for patients on a liquid or soft food diet

  • Bone broth
  • Soup with vegetables

The role of nutrient-dense food in healing the body

  • Bring 100% gluten-free ‘safe stash’ to hospital
  • Refer to Nadine’s list of nutrient-dense options
  • Remember products labeled gluten-free = < 20ppm (not zero)

The Catch 22 of gluten and hospitals

  • Getting hit with gluten can put in hospital (i.e.: dehydration, GI bleed)
  • Difficult to stay gluten-free in hospital
  • Already at-risk to get sicker

How antibiotics affect your system

  • Wipe out good normal flora along with bad bacteria
  • Need good probiotics, fermented foods to reestablish microbiome

Resources:

Gluten Free Drugs Website

Dough Nation by Nadine Grzeskowiak

Emergency Preparedness with Nutrient Dense Foods

Gluten Free RN Episode 15

GIG Resource: Hospital Stays Made Safe

Gluten Intolerance Group of North America

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube