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Nutrient Dense Foods EP051

‘When in doubt, go without.’

The problem with processed food is that you simply can’t be sure that it is gluten-free. The risk of cross-contamination is high, and no one at the big corporations is accountable for your health. Not to mention the fact that processed foods have been irradiated to make them shelf-stable, effectively killing any probiotics. Even certified gluten-free products are often low in nutrients, high in calories—and expensive!

So what should you eat? The Gluten Free RN is on the case with her best suggestions around finding organic, whole foods that contain the healthy fat you need to heal. She explains her revised, gluten-free version of the food pyramid and discusses how these nutrient-dense foods support the healing process.

Nadine provides a list of the best nutrient-dense foods, offering the benefits of each. She also speaks to the most appropriate vitamins and supplements available to solve your nutrient deficiencies. You are what you eat, so make sure you are filling your tank with nutrient-dense foods that will improve your health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

How nutrient dense foods support healing

  • Regenerate villi
  • Reduce inflammation of intestines
  • Heal immune system

Why Nadine recommends staying away from gluten-free junk foods

  • Low in nutrients, high in calories
  • Risk of cross-contamination (processed in facilities with wheat products)

The best sources of nutrient-dense foods

  • Whole foods, organic
  • Farmers market (few/no fertilizers)

Why shelf-stable products lack nutrients

  • Food dead from irradiation, no live probiotics

The risk of contamination in processed foods

  • No one accountable at big corporation
  • ‘When in doubt, go without’

Nadine’s revised food pyramid

  • Fruits and vegetables at base
  • Meat, fish and eggs
  • Nuts, seeds and berries

The importance of eating healthy fats

  • Heals intestines
  • Absorb fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • Fix deficiencies
  • Healthy brain cells, nervous system
  • Balance hormones

Nadine’s recommendations around the best nutrient-dense foods

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Leafy greens (e.g.: kale, collard greens)
  • Berries
  • Coconuts
  • Black molasses
  • Avocados
  • Pumpkin, chia seeds
  • Meat and fish
  • High-quality eggs
  • Licorice root, peppermint tea
  • Cinnamon

Nadine’s vegetable challenge

  • Expand your vegetable repertoire
  • Try one new veggie per week

Nadine’s suggestions around additional vitamins, supplements

  • Good quality multivitamin
  • Fish oil (i.e.: Nordic Naturals)
  • Pre/probiotics
  • Vitamin D

How to avoid cross-contamination

  • Avoid bulk food bins
  • Wash produce

Resources:

Midway Farms on Facebook

Nordic Naturals

Country Life Vitamins

Bluebonnet Nutrition

Pure Encapsulations

National Nurses in Business Association

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Gluten Free Products EP048

The increasing number of gluten-free products on the market can be both a blessing and a curse. Yes, it gives us more options, but are those options truly safe and healthy?

Today the Gluten Free RN goes over the important questions to ask about the products you consume, explaining how the foods promoted by some gluten-free groups may be influenced by their corporate sponsors. She reminds us why we can’t simply trust the products labeled ‘gluten-free’ or ‘gluten removed,’ discussing the lack of oversight and standardization around classification and the cumulative effect of consuming a number of products that are just under the 20 ppm cutoff.

Nadine also shares a list of companies she trusts to consistently produce gluten-free products and offers suggestions around new food options we might explore. Listen in and learn to choose the nutrient-dense foods that will help your body heal!

What’s Discussed:

The importance of questioning the source of your information

  • Gluten-free groups take money from sponsors (corporations, pharmaceutical companies)

 Why Nadine avoids the ‘gluten removed’ label

 The questions to ask about gluten-free products

  • Is it manufactured in a designated facility?
  • From where do they source the ingredients?
  • Do they batch test those ingredients?

 The cumulative effect of eating many products just under 20 ppm

 Reliable companies that consistently produce truly gluten-free products

 The challenges faced by newly diagnosed celiac patients

  • Feeling different
  • Loss of convenience

 Why Nadine avoids gluten-free breads

 New food options to explore as a celiac patient

 Why Nadine recommends reevaluating the foods you consume

  • Ensure they are nutrient dense, don’t cause inflammation

 Why you can’t trust product labels

  • Corporations given six months to update after ingredients change
  • Not required to test products labeled gluten-free (no oversight, standardization)

 Nadine’s rules around choosing products

  • Five ingredients or less
  • Must be able to picture ingredients

Resources:

Canadian Celiac Association

The Gluten Dude on Facebook

Ground Breaker Brewing

The Gluten Intolerance Group of North America

Enjoy Life Foods

Glutino

Namaste Foods

Pamela’s Products

Jilz Crackers

Lundberg Family Farms

Mary’s Gone Crackers

Casabi Crackers & Flatbread

Jackson’s Honest

Kettle Brand

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Applegate

Beeler’s Pure Pork

Hempler’s

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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FAQ’s About Celiac Disease Answered EP047

How do I get over feeling sad about giving up the foods I love? Don’t celiac patients look a certain way? Can I eat wheat when I travel to Europe?

Today the Gluten Free RN is answering your frequently asked questions about celiac disease, clearing up misconceptions around the safety of wheat in Europe, the appearance of a celiac patient, and the percentage of the population that suffers from gluten sensitivity. She speaks to the challenges of getting your healthcare provider to do appropriate testing for celiac disease and the learning curve associated with changing your diet.

Nadine also explains the risks of embarking on a gluten challenge and the benefits of a super-good high fat diet. She discusses why a single breadcrumb can trigger an autoimmune response and how she uses tools like a Nima Sensor when she eats out. Listen in and learn why one negative test doesn’t rule you out for celiac disease, especially if you suffer from type 1 diabetes.

Having celiac disease doesn’t mean you have to live in a bubble. The Gluten Free RN wants to give you the answers you need to navigate the world—happy, healthy and gluten-free!

What’s Discussed: 

‘My sister has celiac disease, but I tested negative. I do have type 1 diabetes… What should I do?’

  • Get genetic test for HLA-DQ2, HLA-DQ8
  • Virtually every type 1 diabetic is gene carrier
  • One test doesn’t rule you out

 ‘Why do you use a Nima Sensor or EZ Gluten test strips? Doesn’t it give you a false sense of security?’

  • Have to trust others to prepare food when out
  • Not foolproof, but does give decent idea

 ‘A single breadcrumb or dusting of flour can trigger an autoimmune response? Really?’

 ‘I am overweight, I have dark hair, and I’m not of European descent. Don’t celiac patients look a certain way?’

  • Can’t see genes, celiac disease can affect any population worldwide
  • Overweight patients tend to be malnourished (unable to absorb nutrients)
  • Never rule out based on appearance, may not show physical symptoms

‘Why do you recommend a super-good high-fat diet?’

‘I’m already on a gluten-free diet. Do I need to go back to gluten to prove I have celiac disease?’

‘My cousin was just diagnosed with celiac disease, and she is very sad about giving up the food she grew up with. How can she get started on a gluten-free diet?’

  • Steep learning curve goes with process
  • Okay to feel sad, angry
  • Remember you will get better without surgery, medication
  • Try to see as an adventure

 ‘Why won’t my doctor order tests for celiac disease?’

  • Countries with for-profit healthcare tend to do poor job of testing, follow-up care
  • Fragmented, inaccurate education around celiac disease
  • Be own best advocate

 ‘Can I eat wheat in Europe?’

 ‘Is it true that celiac disease affects 1% of the population?’

  • 1% translates to 3M people
  • 3% is more accurate statistic
  • Won’t know for sure until conduct mass screening

Resources:

Gluten Free RN EP027: Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Nima Sensor

EZ Gluten Test Strips

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

 

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Dental Issues and Celiac Disease EP039

Did you know that it is possible to diagnose celiac disease with a smile?

Damage from gluten starts in the mouth, and today the Gluten Free RN explores the important role dentists can play in identifying undiagnosed celiac disease. She outlines the symptoms of celiac disease that present in the mouth, the follow-up questions dentists should ask when they notice dental enamel defects or aphthous ulcers, and the nature of the tongue as an indicator of overall health.

This episode covers how the plastics in orthodontic retainers might contain gluten and what to do if you are accidentally exposed. Nadine also explains the relationship between fat-soluble vitamins and celiac disease, as well as the nutrient deficiencies a potential celiac patient should test for. You’re never fully dressed without a smile, so listen in to understand how to keep your mouth healthy—and prevent the accumulation of complications from celiac disease with a whole food, gluten-free diet!

What’s Discussed: 

How the GI tract functions

  • Starts at mouth, ends at rectum
  • Allows us to consume food, liquid
  • Only extract what body needs
  • Expel the rest

How damage from gluten presents

  • Malabsorption of nutrients
  • Inflammation
  • Autoimmune issues
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • ALS
  • Lupus
  • MS
  • Sjögren’s
  • Leaky gut

How dentists can play an important role in identifying undiagnosed celiac disease

The symptoms of celiac disease that present in the mouth

  • Dental enamel defects
  • Aphthous ulcers (canker sores)
  • Cheilosis (cracks, open sores where upper and lower lip join)
  • Dry, cracked lips
  • TMJ—temporal mandibular joint disorder
  • Pain where jaws meet
  • Inflammation of the jaw
  • Clicking
  • Lock jaw
  • Mouth pain, burning
  • Oral lesions
  • Tongue pain, tingling
  • Redness, swelling of the tongue
  • Tongue sores
  • Changes in taste, smell
  • Diminished sensory input
  • Dry mouth
  • Sore throat
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Increased thirst
  • Bleeding gums
  • Delayed eruption of teeth
  • Pyrosis
  • Oral lichen planus
  • Glossitis (inflammation of tongue)
  • Clearing throat
  • Sinus infections
  • Redness, swelling of the uvula

How Nadine treats gluten exposure

  • Activated charcoal
  • Drink water

The grains to look for in personal care products (e.g.: lip balm)

  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Oats

The relationship between fat soluble vitamins and celiac disease

  • Gluten causes malabsorption
  • Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat soluble
  • Under 40 in vitamin D may indicate deficiency in all

How we tested for celiac disease in children in the early 20th century

  • Fecal fat score
  • Pale stool that floats suggests malabsorption of A, D, E and K

Why parents should be tested for celiac disease prior to pregnancy

The fetal development issues that may present if an expectant mother is unable to absorb nutrients

  • Dental enamel defects
  • Smaller jaw formation
  • Smaller airway passages

Why Nadine advocates for a mass screening

How gluten in plastics, personal care products can prevent celiac patients from healing

The questions dentists should ask when they notice dental enamel defects, aphthous ulcers

  • Other clinical celiac symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, fatigue)
  • Associated disorders (type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis, etc.)
  • Family history of celiac disease

Why we need to get much better at recognizing celiac signs and symptoms

  • Even in Canada, diagnosis takes 11.7 years

Why Eastern medicine examines the tongue as an indicator of overall health

The genes that indicate a predisposition to celiac disease

  • HLA-DQ2
  • HLA-DQ8

Why it is acceptable to adopt a gluten-free diet if your antibody test is negative for celiac disease

The deficiencies a potential celiac patient should test for

  • Calcium
  • Magnesium RBC
  • Vitamin D
  • Zinc
  • Folic acid

Why thrush may be an indicator of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity

Why one negative test for celiac disease doesn’t rule anyone out

The importance of early diagnosis

  • Symptoms accumulate over the years

The Paleo diet Nadine suggests for celiac and gluten-sensitive patients

  • Whole food
  • Focus on local, fresh
  • 100% grass-fed meat (no antibiotic, no hormone)
  • Fish and eggs
  • Nuts and seeds
  • 100% organic fruits and vegetables

Resources:

 “An Orthodontic Retainer Preventing Remission in Celiac Disease”  in Clinical Pediatrics

“Oral Manifestations of Celiac Disease: A Clinical Guide for Dentists” in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association

Gluten Free RN Podcast EP027: Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

“The Association Between Celiac Disease, Dental Enamel Defects, and Aphthous Ulcers in a United States Cohort” in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

“Small-Bowel Changes in Recurrent Ulceration of the Mouth” in Hepatogastroenterology

“Oral Signs and HLA-DQB1*02 Haploytypes in the Celiac Paediatric Patient: A Preliminary Study” in Autoimmune Diseases

“The Oral Manifestations of Celiac Disease: Information for the Pediatric Dentist” in Pediatric Dentistry

“Oral Aphthous Ulcers and Dental Enamel Defects in Children with Coeliac Disease” in Acta Paediatrica

“Oral and Dental Manifestations of Celiac Disease” in the New York State Dental Journal

“Jejunal Mucosal Abnormalities in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Ulceration” in The British Medical Journal

“Dental Enamel Defects in Adult Coeliac Disease” in the European Journal of Internal Medicine

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Children with Dental Enamel Defects”  in ISRN Pediatrics

“Celiac Disease Associated with Recurrent Aphthae” in Gut

“Importance of Oral Signs in the Diagnosis of Atypical Forms of Celiac Disease” in Recenti Progressi in Medicina

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Impact of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease on Fetal Development and Maternal Health EP024


‘With our technology, every time a woman dies, it’s a medical error.’

 Recent reports have uncovered some alarming statistics regarding maternal mortality rates in the United States. While these numbers are on the decline in every other developed nation, pregnant women in the US are at greater risk of dying than they were in recent years. We know that undiagnosed celiac disease has a significant impact on maternal health and fetal development, and we must identify expectant mothers (and fathers) who have the potential to reap remarkable benefits from a simple diet change.

This issue is especially important to the Gluten Free RN as a mother herself – as well as an emergency ER nurse certified in PALS, NLS and pediatric emergency nursing. She shares the stories of women who had difficulty getting pregnant or maintaining pregnancies as a result of undiagnosed celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, and explains how a mass screening could work to prevent such intense suffering.

Listen to learn how adopting a gluten-free or Paleo diet can help women carry their babies to full-term and deliver healthy, thriving children!

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s mission to get women tested for celiac disease prior to pregnancy

  • Allows to absorb nutrients during pregnancy (including prenatal vitamins)
  • Can deliver healthy, thriving child

 The story of Alice Bast

  • Suffered miscarriage and still births
  • Multiple doctors couldn’t provide answers
  • Vet gave idea to test for celiac disease
  • Founded the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

 The necessity for a mass screening of men and women

  • Identify HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 gene carriers
  • Genes of both parents affect fetal health
  • Ratio of women to men with celiac disease is 1:1
  • Ratio of women to men diagnosed with celiac disease is 3:1

 The increased risks for pregnant women with undiagnosed celiac disease

  • Miscarriage
  • Still birth
  • Low birth weight
  • Failure to thrive in children
  • Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (dangerously high blood pressure)

 The role men play in infertility

  • ED, low sperm count and low libido may be attributed to undiagnosed celiac disease
  • Symptoms include deficiencies in zinc, magnesium and B vitamins as well as anemia and osteoporosis

 The argument that a mass screening for celiac disease is too expensive

  • The cost associated with undiagnosed celiac disease is much higher
  • Consists of medical costs from complications
  • Also includes decreased productivity and morbidity/mortality
  • Study published in Science Digest found that 42,000 children may die annually due to undiagnosed celiac disease

 Conditions that indicate high risk for celiac disease

  • Chronic GI issues
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Weight loss/gain
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Vitamin/mineral deficiencies
  • Secondary hyperparathyroidism
  • Unexplained elevations in liver function
  • Down, Turner or Williams syndrome
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Lupus
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease

 Sam’s story

  • Delayed puberty (didn’t get period until 17-years-old)
  • Diagnosed with celiac disease at 19
  • Doctors warned she would probably never have children
  • Raising two healthy boys

 Why Nadine is concerned about the current generation of children

  • Higher rates of autoimmune diseases, cancer and learning disabilities

 The appropriate diet to promote maternal health and proper fetal development

  • Gluten- and dairy-free
  • Paleo is best
  • Humans have enzymes to break down meat proteins
  • Humans do not have enzymes to break down grain proteins
  • Avoid wheat, barley, rye and oats
  • Embrace meat, fish, eggs, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds

 Deficiencies that can be corrected to promote healthy pregnancy

  • B6 and B12
  • A, D, E and K (the fat-soluble vitamins)
  • Magnesium RBC
  • Zinc

 The US maternal mortality rate compared to other developed nations

  • Rising in the US, declining in other developed nations
  • 28 deaths for every 100,000 births in 2013, up from 23 in 2005

Resources:

“Maternal Mortality Rate in US Rises, Defying Global Trend, Study Finds” in The New York Times

“Focus on Infants During Childbirth Leaves US Moms in Danger” on NPR

Beyond Celiac: Alice Bast

“Reproductive Changes Associated with Celiac Disease” from the World Journal of Gastroenterology

“Celiac Disease and Reproductive Health” from Celiac Disease: A Comprehensive Review and Update

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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The Potential Connection Between Parkinson’s and Celiac Disease EP021


A diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is devastating, and the associated symptoms – difficulty walking, tremors, memory issues – are debilitating. But what if those symptoms aren’t necessarily indicative of Parkinson’s after all? What if a simple diet change could improve or even eliminate those symptoms?

Today Nadine explores anecdotal evidence suggesting that the symptoms of Parkinson’s and other demyelination syndromes might be actually be caused by celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. She argues that as Parkinson’s diagnoses become more and more common, it is imperative that we explore the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease.

Listen in to understand how gluten can affect the neurological system, why Parkinson’s patients should be tested for celiac disease, and how a gluten-free diet can heal neurological damage.

What’s Discussed: 

Nadine’s Parkinson’s patient

  • Diagnosed with celiac disease as a child in the 1940’s
  • Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s
  • Symptoms included difficulty walking, falling, stooped gait, masked appearance, tremors, memory issues and confusion
  • Discovered unintentional gluten exposure in the home
  • Moved to adult foster home to ensure gluten-free diet
  • Many symptoms went away
  • Working with neurologist to wean off Parkinson’s meds

Why patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s, ALS and MS should get test for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

  • Every nerve in the body is insulated with myelin
  • Myelin is made of fat
  • Gluten prevents the absorption of fats
  • Parkinson’s, ALS and MS are all demyelination syndromes

The need for research regarding the potential connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease

  • The University of Chicago asserts there is ‘no published evidence of a connection between Parkinson’s and celiac disease’
  • Nadine argues that enough anecdotal evidence exists to suggest that a connection should be investigated

Nadine’s recommendation for a comprehensive celiac lab test

  • Cyrex Labs tests for 25 of the gluten intolerant antibodies, including tTG-2, tTG-3 and tTG-6
  • Ask for a total IgA and IgG in addition to the Cyrex Array 3
  • Insurance should cover the tests
  • Can be ordered by any practitioner

Celiac diagnoses in patients over 60

  • 30% of newly diagnosed celiac patients are over 60
  • Many have neurological issues
  • Neuropathy
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Seizure disorders
  • Difficulty walking
  • Falling
  • Balance issues
  • MS
  • Nadine’s patients improve on a Paleo diet

The Stanford idiopathic familial narcolepsy study

  • Entire family diagnosed with narcolepsy
  • Found that family members had celiac disease
  • Adopting a gluten-free diet eliminated the narcolepsy
  • Family now runs organic farm

The increasing number of Parkinson’s diagnoses

  • More and more common
  • UK neurological expert routinely tests for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

How your body heals neurological damage in the absence of gluten

  • Heal intestines
  • Eliminate inflammation
  • Repair immune system
  • Replete nutrient deficiencies

Vitamin D

  • Cancer preventative
  • Level should be between 60-80
  • Indicator of all fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K)
  • ‘Sunshine’ vitamin synthesized through skin
  • Must also be taken in dietarily
  • Little chance of overdosing on D3

What your nails can tell you about your health

  • Look for white spots, cracked nails, hangnails
  • May indicate lack of zinc, D3, or B vitamins

Dr. Terry Wahls’ MS misdiagnosis

  • Diagnosed with MS and required wheelchair
  • Healed with a gluten-free diet
  • Can ride her bike and walk without a cane

Nadine’s story

  • At 40, her symptoms suggested MS
  • Issues with clumsiness (falling, dragging feet, dropping things, difficulty with balance)
  • Problems went away on a gluten-free diet
  • Nutrient deficiencies were causing neurological issues

Celiac cerebellar ataxia

  • Caused by lesions on or inflammation of the brain
  • Results in inability to walk straight
  • Tissue can be healed on a gluten free diet

 Resources:

Cyrex Laboratories

Midway Farms

La Mancha Ranch and Orchard

Dr. Wahls’ TED Talk

Dr. Wahls’ YouTube Channel

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles – by Terry Wahls, MD and Eve Adamson

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Down, Turner and Williams Syndrome EP018

The medical community has an obligation to protect vulnerable populations, speaking up for any group that may not be able to advocate for themselves, and patients with Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome certainly fall into this category. Yet one facet of their health – one that could vastly improve quality of life – often goes overlooked.

There is a high prevalence of celiac disease among individuals with Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome, and it is recommended that these patients get tested annually. Unfortunately, many of the symptoms of celiac disease are attributed to the syndrome instead, and gluten sensitivity goes undiagnosed.

Today Nadine shares several case studies as well as her own experience working with patients with developmental delays. She covers the high incidence of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in Down, Turner, and Williams syndrome patients, the signs and symptoms of gluten damage, and the importance of annual screening in this population.

What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in individuals with Down, Tuner and Williams syndrome

  • Annual testing is recommended
  • Signs and symptoms can be eliminated with a gluten-free diet

Tiffany’s story

  • Williams syndrome patient
  • Suffered from stage 4 liver failure and diabetes
  • Endured cracked, bleeding skin and fluid in the abdomen
  • Tested positive for celiac disease
  • Gluten-free diet resolved most of her symptoms

Alternatives to the standard blood test that could reveal non-celiac gluten sensitivity in Down syndrome patients

  • The anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) is an excellent biomarker
  • In a study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, 41% of Down syndrome patients had AGA antibodies

 The importance of testing family members

  • A mother who is malnourished during pregnancy may have a child with Down, Turner or Williams syndrome
  • Celiac disease may disrupt fetal development

The overlap of celiac disease and Down syndrome

  • Study found that 18 of 284 subjects ages two to 15 tested positive for celiac disease
  • In another study, 11 of 47 had positive blood tests

Symptoms of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Gas
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Short stature
  • Brittle bones
  • Osteoporosis
  • Osteopenia
  • Thyroid issues
  • Anemia
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Skin rash
  • Decreased appetite
  • Yeast overgrowth
  • Lichen planus
  • Difficulty swallowing

Nadine’s story of an autistic patient

  • Sweet gentleman who lived in group home
  • Suffered from diabetes, repeated infections and self-harm
  • Paleo diet made him calmer, didn’t irritate his throat
  • He enjoyed an improved quality of life

Cases of asymptomatic celiac disease in children with Down syndrome

  • Study published in the International Journal of Pediatrics
  • Toddlers screened at around 24 months
  • Biopsy proven celiac disease identified in 3-9% of children with Down syndrome
  • Not all patients with positive screens receive a biopsy if asymptomatic
  • One child in the study gained weight and energy on a gluten-free diet
  • A second child had less constipation and diarrhea
  • Follow-up study reported that 66% had health improvement

Resources Mentioned:

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Down’s Syndrome Patients Revealed Cases of Subtotal Villous Atrophy Without Typical for Celiac Disease HLA-DQ and Tissue Transglutaminase Antibodies” from the World Journal of Gastroenterology

“Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Down’s Syndrome” from the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

“Asymptomatic Celiac Disease in Children with Trisomy 21 at 26 Months of Age or Less” from the International Journal of Pediatrics

Other Resources:

“Celiac Disease” from the Pediatric Gastroenterology Board Review Manual

“The Coexistence of Down Syndrome and a Triad Consisting of: Coeliac Disease, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus and Congenital Hypothyroidism” from Down Syndrome Research and Practice

“Coeliac Disease in Williams Syndrome” from the Journal of Medical Genetics

“Turner Syndrome and Celiac Disease: A Case-Control Study” from Pediatrics

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease Worldwide EP016


Wherever there is wheat, there is susceptibility to celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Gluten is a growing global problem, exacerbated by the popularity of the western diet around the world. This issue has personal, social and political implications as it places a significant economic burden on individuals, communities, and even entire nations.

 The Gluten Free RN brings us a ‘big picture’ perspective of the celiac and gluten sensitive population around the world, as we learn about how other countries support these individuals. She also covers the industries that have begun to recognize the power of the gluten free population as a consumer group.

 Nadine will be doing some globe-trotting herself come September for the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, and she is currently soliciting advice regarding where and how to eat safely during her travels in India and Thailand. Feel free to message her with recommendations!  

What’s Discussed: 

When and where wheat originated

  • Fertile Crescent (Northern Africa and the Middle East)
  • 10,000 years ago
  • High prevalence of celiac disease in these regions now

 The International Celiac Disease Symposium

  • September 2017 in New Delhi
  • Held every two years
  • Scientists, medical professionals and other interested parties
  • Share latest research

 Where celiac disease is common

  • Anywhere people are eating grains
  • More widespread as other regions adopt a western diet
  • Increased risk in Punjab population of India

 The basics of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

  • Can present in many ways (300+ signs and symptoms)
  • #1 autoimmune disease in the world
  • More likely to recover the sooner identified
  • 30-50% of the population carry the genes (HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8) that indicate predisposition
  • Body doesn’t have enzymes to break down gluten proteins
  • Gluten damages intestines
  • Nadine recommends adopting a Paleo diet in order to heal

 The World Health Organization’s “burden of disease”

  • Measures the impact of celiac disease
  • Based on financial cost, mortality, morbidity, etc.

 How Italy supports celiac patients

  • Provide extra days off work for doctor’s appointments, shopping
  • Ship gluten free food

 Potential symptoms of celiac disease affecting every ethnicity

  • Odd gait (gluten ataxia)
  • Skin rash (dermatitis herpetiformis)

 The power of celiac and gluten-sensitive patients as a group

  • Largest untapped market in the world
  • Some industries taking notice (pharmaceutical, food)
  • Use influence to heal selves and educate others

 Why some people are so resistant to eliminating grains

  • Sometimes crave what is bad for you
  • Nutritional deficiencies may cause addiction

 Resources Mentioned:

 Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies –  by Jared M. Diamond

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Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism