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Indigenous Populations, Celiac Disease and NCGS EP067

‘Globally, indigenous peoples suffer from poorer health, are more likely to experience disability and reduced quality of life, and ultimately die younger than their non-indigenous counterparts.’

A UN Report on the health of indigenous peoples points to a significant problem, but the question is WHY? Why are native populations more prone to autoimmune disorders and type 1 diabetes? Why do they have a higher incidence of alcoholism and drug addiction? And why the lower life expectancy?

The Gluten Free RN is exploring the role of food in health outcomes for indigenous populations around the world. She begins with an explanation of the dietary differences between hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, discussing how native populations were exposed to the gluten in grains only when European conquerors came to occupy their lands.

Nadine shares her challenge in finding information about indigenous populations and celiac disease, explaining why further study is necessary. She speaks to the highly processed nature of the commodity foods provided to Native Americans in the US and the shortcomings of Canada’s Food Guide when it comes to the health of First Nations people. Listen in and learn the significance of educating indigenous populations around celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, empowering those groups to make choices that will improve their health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed:

The global indigenous population

  • 370M in 70-plus countries
  • Rich diversity of cultures

The health status of indigenous populations

  • Higher incidence of autoimmune disorders, T1D
  • Higher prevalence of addictive disorders, cardiovascular disease
  • Lower life expectancy, increased morbidity/mortality

Why indigenous populations have more health issues

  • Access to health care, isolation and lifestyle
  • Food (hunter-gatherer vs. agricultural society)

The lack of information around indigenous populations and celiac disease

  • Very few studies available

The impact of grains on the native population

  • Significant change in health care outcomes, quality of life

The prevalence of celiac disease in indigenous populations

  • At least 1%, likely 3% or higher
  • No way to know without mass screening

Why eating healthy is a challenge for the indigenous population

  • Food scarcity, desserts
  • Reliance on commodity foods provided by government

The conclusions of the Prairie Nymph blog on Canada’s Food Guide

  • Based on diet of European origins, doesn’t mention celiac disease
  • Ignores health benefits of traditional diet for First Nations people

Why it’s important to educate indigenous people around celiac disease

  • Empower to make food choices with better health outcomes

Resources:

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies by Jaren M. Diamond

Dough Nation by Nadine Grzeskowiak

USDA Commodity Supplemental Food Program

‘Canada’s Food Guide and Native Women’ by Prairie Nymph

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman

American Indian and Alaska Native Health

‘Celiac Disease: A Disorder Emerging from Antiquity, Its Evolving Classification and Risk, and Potential New Treatment Paradigms’ in Gut Liver

‘Celiac Disease: A Life-Changing Diagnosis’ in Indian Country Today

‘Government Food Boxes? It’s Nothing New for Native Americans’ on WDET

UN Indigenous Peoples Fact Sheet

‘Many Native Americans Lack Access to Healthy Food, But There’s a Growing Movement to Change That’ in Grist

‘Characteristics and Factors Related to Quality of Life in Mexican Mestizo Patients with Celiac Disease’ in BMC Gastroenterology

Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

WHO Health of Indigenous Peoples

WHO Indigenous Peoples and Substance Abuse

Connect with Nadine:

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Melodies of the Danube Gluten-Free Cruise with Nadine

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Heal

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Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease EP027

Struggling to maintain control of your blood sugar? A gluten-free diet may be the answer! If you have one autoimmune disorder, you have a 30-50% greater risk of developing another, and both type 1 diabetes and celiac disease fall into that category.

As more and more research points to an enormous overlap between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, it is in our best interests to mitigate additional risk by getting screened and/or adopting a gluten-free or Paleo diet to mitigate further risk. Today Nadine discusses the prevalence of diabetes, several research studies that explore the connection between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, and the potential risks for type 1 diabetics who are undiagnosed celiac patients.

Listen and learn how your diet may be affecting your blood sugar and why going gluten-free could improve your health and quality of life!

What’s Discussed: 

The prevalence of diabetes

  • By 2050, half the population will have diabetes
  • According to CDC, 29.1 million have diabetes
  • One out of four don’t know they are diabetic
  • 18,000 young people diagnosed from 2008-2009

The difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes

  • Minimize risk for type 2 through diet and exercise
  • Type 1 is autoimmune disorder, don’t produce enough insulin to break down sugar

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes

  • Extreme thirst
  • Urgency to urinate frequently
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness

The enormous genetic overlap between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

  • Scottish study found 94% of type 1 diabetics were HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 gene carriers
  • 100% overlap if include HLA-DQ2.2
  • Prevalence of celiac disease among type 1 diabetics is 20% higher than general population

The importance of testing all type 1 diabetics for celiac disease annually

  • Can develop celiac disease at any age

The consequences of undiagnosed celiac disease in children with type 1 diabetes

  • Short stature
  • Failure to thrive
  • Early onset osteopenia, osteoporosis
  • Easily broken or rubbery bones
  • Difficulty maintaining glycemic control (low blood sugar, spikes)
  • Anemia

The decreased quality of life for type 1 diabetics who are undiagnosed celiac

  • Development of infections
  • Difficulty with blood sugar maintenance

Research studies re: the percentages of type 1 diabetics who also have celiac disease

  • Iraq – 11.2%
  • Mexican participants – 5.9%
  • Denmark – 12.3%

Nadine’s anecdotal evidence of the overlap

  • Volunteers at community outreach clinic
  • Young man struggling to control blood sugar
  • Nadine recommended gluten-free diet
  • Improved health and quality of life

Health risks associated with an inability to control blood sugar

  • Blindness
  • Kidney failure
  • Amputation of extremities
  • Difficulty healing wounds
  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes

Why carb counting doesn’t control blood sugar

  • Carbs with little/no nutrient value cause spikes in blood sugar

The diet Nadine recommends for type 1 diabetics

  • Variation of Paleo diet
  • Nutrient dense foods
  • Meat and fish
  • Eggs
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Nuts and seeds

The benefits of a gluten-free diet for type 1 diabetics

  • Weight easier to control
  • Immune system works better
  • Tighter control on blood sugar

The lack of uniformity in screening guidelines

Additional autoimmune diseases that may be avoided with a gluten-free diet

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Lupus
  • Sjögren’s
  • Scleroderma
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Graves’ disease
  • Hashimoto’s
  • Vitiligo
  • Raynaud’s

Potential triggers for autoimmune disorders

  • Gluten
  • Change in microbiome
  • Stress to body (i.e.: cold, food poisoning, travel)

 Treatments for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

  • Low FODMAPs or specific carb diet
  • Rifaximin (antibiotic)

The dangers of maintaining high blood sugar

  • Damage to kidneys, eyes, capillaries, fingers and toes
  • Neuropathy
  • Gastroparesis

The long history of a connection between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

The need for information re: the connection in diabetic education services

Resources:

“Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease: The Effects of Gluten Free Diet on Metabolic Control” in the World Journal of Diabetes

“Co-occurrence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Celiac Disease” in the World Journal of Diabetes

“Screening for Coeliac Disease in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Myths, Facts and Controversy in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome

“The Prevalence of Coeliac Disease in Libyan Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus” in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews

“Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Celiac Disease: Prevalence and Effect on Clinical and Histological Presentation” in BMC Gastroenterology

“Coexistence of Coeliac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes” in Przeglad Gastroenterologiczny

“Screening for Celiac Disease in Type 1 Diabetes: A Systematic Review” in AAP News and Journals

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

‘Your Skin on Gluten’ on YouTube

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism

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Celiac Disease and its Associated Autoimmune Disorders EP010


This time on the ‘Gluten Free RN’ podcast, Nadine examines the many autoimmune disorders that are associated with celiac disease. Once you have acquired one autoimmune disease, your chances of developing another increase exponentially – Nadine had seven!

Nadine shares how she was able to heal the inflammation in her intestines that caused those autoimmune disorders and go from a positive ANA panel to a negative one in just a year on a Paleo diet.

Listen and understand which autoimmune diseases are linked to gluten intolerance and how to dodge those bullets by going gluten-free!

What’s Discussed: 

The chances of developing additional autoimmune disorders

  • Once you have one autoimmune disease, your chances of developing another are 30% -50% greater

Nadine’s ‘collection’ of autoimmune disorders

  • Raynaud’s phenomenon is a circulation issue that gave her purple/white hands and feet
  • Sjogren’s syndrome dried out her mucus membranes
  • She suffered from arthritis and joint pain
  • Alopecia caused her hair to thin and fall out

Why celiac disease is sometimes misdiagnosed as MS, ALS or Parkinson’s

How Dr. Terry Wahls went from a wheelchair to riding a bike by eliminating gluten

How it is possible for your body to heal the inflammation causing autoimmune disorders, regardless of what the medical establishment says

  • Remove the things that cause damage
  • Replace the nutrients your body needs

Additional autoimmune disorders associated with celiac disease

  • Liver disease (primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis)
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Addison’s disease
  • Dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Alopecia
  • Vitiligo
  • Neurological issues (gluten ataxia, peripheral neuropathies)
  • Connective tissue diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis)
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Autoimmune pericarditis
  • Psoriasis
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Pancreatitis
  • Microscopic colitis
  • Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
  • Wilson’s disease

The importance of checking magnesium RBC levels in cardiac patients

The genetic overlap between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

  • A study in Scotland found that 94% of Type 1 diabetics carry the HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 genes

Resources Mentioned: 

The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles by Terry Wahls MD and Eve Adamson

Terry Wahls MD Research Study Update

Connect with Nadine: 

Instagram

Facebook

Contact via Email

Books by Nadine:

Dough Nation: A Nurse’s Memoir of Celiac Disease from Missed Diagnosis to Food and Health Activism